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Are they doing away with the ASN programs?

Posted

Hi,

I have always wanted to be a nurse and am looking forward to enrolling in my community college to start my pre reqs to try and get into their nursing program. I am hoping to start the enrollment process in the next few months.

What has been worrying me lately is I've heard that the topic is being pushed currently for the ASN to be thrown out of the mix, leaving


a BSN as the only route to get into the nursing field. This terrifies me, since money is a major factor for me. The only way I'd ever be able to go to a university for my nursing degree is if I took out a bunch of loans which I really do not want to ever have to do. My NP friend brought up that they've recently made changes to the MSN programs, requiring everybody interested in becoming an NP to now have their doctorates in nursing, and that's when he also brought up the thing about possibly doing away with associates programs altogether. I just don't want to be halfway through the program only to be told oops, gotta get your bachelor's.

What do you all think? Input?

NurseGirl525, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

There are tons of threads on this. No, ASN programs are not going away. And a NP can still get their masters. Your friend is wrong. Yes, there is talk of requiring BSNs as entry level in hospitals and some require it now. Some but not all. You can't always buy into the hype. Research the job market in your area.

No some are only hiring BSN's and also nursing homes only hire Lpn's or RN's to run them.

Kuriin, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency. Has 5 years experience.

Your friend is half right. Current and new graduates that are nurse practitioners will be grandfathered and any person interested in being a MSN NP must get their education done BEFORE a specific year (I think it's 2024?). After that, it will be only DNP. In regards to the ADN going away -- partially true. Hospitals will most likely prefer BSN over ADN simply because of the higher level of education.

studentnursemon86

Specializes in ER/Emergency Behavioral Health.... Has 8+ years experience.

My current hospital won't hire from outside with an ASN, but they will hire internally if you sign a contract to start BSN courses after 1 year and graduate in 5.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Check your market, as well as what your personal goals are, and make your decision from there.

loveofrn, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU. Has 3 years experience.

Check your market, as well as what your personal goals are, and make your decision from there.

I saw a post like this from you when I got accepted to ccp and after checking phillys job market; I realized that getting my bsn is the best way to go. Now, am starting holy family university next week. Thanks for your advice

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

I saw a post like this from you when I got accepted to ccp and after checking phillys job market; I realized that getting my bsn is the best way to go. Now, am starting holy family university next week. Thanks for your advice

Oh! :shy:

You're welcome. :up:

The market here is not oversaturated as far as I know. I have never known a nurse here to have any difficulty at all finding jobs. 2 of my recent grad nurse friends already had jobs waiting for them when they graduated and the rest found jobs within the month. This was a mixture of both ASN and BSN. Nurses never have a hard time finding jobs here.

I would of course continue my education via a bridge program once I graduate. I do want my BSN, but the 4 year route is too expensive. That's why I freaked when he said that about the associates programs. I just wanted to make sure my hard work isn't going to be for nothing. Right now I am working full time as a dental assistant to save as much as I can, and hope to pay off most of what tuition and books would cost in one years time if not all. This was all part of my plan to get myself into nursing school as quick as I can without leaving much debt for myself along the way.

Thank you for your input. I really needed to hear from people who are already nurses and get their 2 cents. I read a lot of the older threads on this issue but couldn't find one that was recent so I just wanted to make darn sure those programs weren't going anywhere!

Edited by ac9390
spelling

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

I can understand your concern, especially after hearing that from your friend. You'll be fine doing your ASN then bridging to BSN when you're ready. Just be aware, too, that in many markets, ASN nurses have an almost impossible time trying to get hospital jobs. There are plenty of other avenues for nursing, like home health, SNF, etc, where ASNs are generally on a level playing field with BSNs. And, as mentioned above, some hospitals will accept ASNs if they will obtain their BSN by a certain date.

You're lucky to be in an area where nurses are able to find work, especially new grads. Most places, nurses have a very tough time these days, even experienced nurses.

Regarding the MSN/DNP thing, I've heard that as well, but I don't know when that's being implemented. I've heard as early as 2015 here in CA, but as mentioned above, those who have already obtained their NP will be grandfathered in.

OrganizedChaos, LVN

Specializes in M/S, LTC, Corrections, PDN & drug rehab. Has 10 years experience.

You have to check the job market where you're at. I know the hospital where I live will hire ADNs. But if I were to apply to a bigger city, like San Antonio or Houston, I would need my BSN. I don't see ADN programs ever being shut down.

I know for a fact that here in Louisiana, the DNP rule will be implemented in 2015. My friend will be graduating with an MSN in December. I'm not sure if the classes directly behind his will be grandfathered it, but that only sounds fair! I sure hope they will be!

I certainly do not mind taking a couple crappy jobs in the beginning as an ASN. All I want is to be a nurse. That's my goal. I'm not looking for instant gratification or to land my dream job right out of school at some amazing hospital with just an ASN and live happily ever after--I'm looking to work my way up in the most financially responsible way I know how. I do not have much family help at all, so doing this responsibly is very important to me and my future. I do realize that this profession has been romanticized big time, which is why I started myself out as a dental assistant because A) getting my certification in that was 5x cheaper than getting my LPN, and B) to test the waters and make sure I'm comfortable around blood, needles, spit, mucus, vomit, etc. I am. Turns out I love it, and want to go further with serving the public than just working in their mouth. If taking some iffy jobs and bad shifts is how I have to work my way up the ladder and get my experience in while I'm in school doing my bridge, then so be it. But, I have been told by several people in my area that hospitals around here will hire ASN's as well, and start them off at the same pay as BSN's. I'm not expecting that outcome. I'm just looking to make progress.

nekozuki, LPN

Specializes in Pediatrics. Has 5 years experience.

Yes, you are safe to earn your ASN for the foreseeable future.

Yes, you will find work.

No, employers will not hiss and swipe at your job application like an angry cat.

No, you may not waltz into an ICU making 35/hr. For that, you may need a BSN. And experience. And connections. And a fairy godmother.

Like others have said, it depends on the local job market. But for sure, there are places where ASNs are on a more or less level playing field with BSNs. At the hospital I currently work at, ASNs are paid the same, can get hired into critical care areas like ICU & ED, and are given an annual stipend for education if they're enrolled in an RN-BSN bridge program. A large part of this is due to the hospital's continual expansion and struggle to keep up with the demand for more nurses.

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

I know for a fact that here in Louisiana, the DNP rule will be implemented in 2015. My friend will be graduating with an MSN in December. I'm not sure if the classes directly behind his will be grandfathered it, but that only sounds fair! I sure hope they will be!

I certainly do not mind taking a couple crappy jobs in the beginning as an ASN. All I want is to be a nurse. That's my goal. I'm not looking for instant gratification or to land my dream job right out of school at some amazing hospital with just an ASN and live happily ever after--I'm looking to work my way up in the most financially responsible way I know how. I do not have much family help at all, so doing this responsibly is very important to me and my future. I do realize that this profession has been romanticized big time, which is why I started myself out as a dental assistant because A) getting my certification in that was 5x cheaper than getting my LPN, and B) to test the waters and make sure I'm comfortable around blood, needles, spit, mucus, vomit, etc. I am. Turns out I love it, and want to go further with serving the public than just working in their mouth. If taking some iffy jobs and bad shifts is how I have to work my way up the ladder and get my experience in while I'm in school doing my bridge, then so be it. But, I have been told by several people in my area that hospitals around here will hire ASN's as well, and start them off at the same pay as BSN's. I'm not expecting that outcome. I'm just looking to make progress.

You are wrong. There are no states as of yet that mandate the DNP. There are states that
hat Will Change in 2015? by Scott Governo, NP, DNP: The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) suggested that the DNP be the terminal degree for advanced practice nursing beginning in 2015. The AACN is a self-described advocate for nursing standards and does have considerable influence in educating nurses today and into the future. A more detailed explanation of the DNP can be found here: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/dnp/pdf/essentials.pdf.

State nurse practice acts are what guide NPs' legal status, scope of practice, and so on. They have not changed their requirements, despite a strong movement by many, from the master's preparation to a DNP degree. The hope among many proponents of the DNP is that eventually the laws will change toward a more autonomous role and a widening of scope. This, however, remains to be seen and my expectation is that special interest groups on both sides of the issue will be more than vocal and that only with strong public support and the recognition of the quality of healthcare delivered by NPs will nurses be allowed to practice to their fullest ability.

My understanding of the call for the transition from the master's to the DNP preparation by 2015 is that it is "recommended" or "endorsed," but NOT "mandated." However, just to be certain I reviewed many organization websites such as the AACN (American Association of Colleges of Nursing), CCNE (Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education), AANP (American Academy of Nurse Practitioners), and NONPF (National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties). I also attended the third National Doctors of Nursing Conference in San Diego in 2010. I had the opportunity to talk with nursing leaders and policy makers on this very issue. The verdict is that the call by the AACN for transitioning advanced practice nursing to the doctoral level by 2015 is only a "recommendation."
There are recommendations in the works. There has been a calling for BSN entry into nursing since the seventies.

Right now most job markets are hiring BSN new grads only. There is nothing in the foreseeable future that the ADN programs will be closing. Once you are a RN you are a RN.....however your job search as a new grad might be more difficult as an ADN grad. HOwever....if yoiu are young it is really important that you get your BSN pretty quick as I do see that it will be a part of your future for it to be necessary to have your BSN.

BeachsideRN, ASN

Specializes in NICU. Has 2 years experience.

You are wrong. There are no states as of yet that mandate the DNP. There are states thatThere are recommendations in the works. There has been a calling for BSN entry into nursing since the seventies.

Right now most job markets are hiring BSN new grads only. There is nothing in the foreseeable future that the ADN programs will be closing. Once you are a RN you are a RN.....however your job search as a new grad might be more difficult as an ADN grad. HOwever....if yoiu are young it is really important that you get your BSN pretty quick as I do see that it will be a part of your future for it to be necessary to have your BSN.

Actually, this poster is referring to the fact that the schools in La that have previously offered MSN-NPs are actively phasing them out and by 2015 will solely be a DNP. It may not be a change at the legislative level, but as far as education is concerned the Louisiana schools are converting to DNP by 2015.

Miss.LeoRN

Specializes in Cardiac Stepdown, PCU.

I think A LOT of the time, the "get the BSN, hospitals only want BSN!" when vs. ADN people seem to forget that just because your getting an ADN doesn't mean you can't bridge over to BSN. There are no BSN programs within 100 miles of where I live. There are plenty of ADN programs, and plenty of bridge programs however. The major hospital network for our area works directly with our program and hires new grads out of it all the time in their area facilities. However, they are a BSN preferred network, and do require that you get your BSN within 5 years of employment.

Get the ADN, then bridge to RN. Especially if it's cheaper than an outright BSN program. Might take you half a semester longer but seriously, who cares. I've never understood why people seem to freak out over their graduation date. Find a BSN bridge immediately, and then you start applying for jobs, make it a point to mention you are in progress of getting your BSN.