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Anybody Performs Physical Therapy Exercises On Pediatric Private Duty

Private Duty   (427 Views | 2 Replies)

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I'm doing private on a 18 month old. She was a premie. In addition to other medical issues Baby Doe (BD) is late with reaching some physical developmental milestones. BD goes to physical therapy once a week, I attend also. Although I'm officially there for only the medical issues, all my possible "down time" I happily spend "playing" with BD engaging the different physical therapy excercises. I put BD AFOs on and place in stander for 20 minutes most days. Anybody else use stander or do excercises to strengthen core, back, legs with the goal of being able to sit upright unassisted, stand holding on to sofa, crawl using legs (not just arms, like an "army crawl")?

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Have done this when I have been taught or have written instructions, particularly if included on plan of care. Be careful if not on plan of care. Get anything being done added to plan of care and instructions from the therapist if necessary. They should get the doctor’s order, but you can, if they drop the ball. Prepare to find out you are the only nurse actually doing the therapy. I find the AFO’s hidden in the same unused position, and wonder why the supervisors never address this failing. If nurses are going to refuse to do something ordered, then get the doctor to discontinue the order!

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Kitiger has 40 years experience as a RN and specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics.

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Depending on the client, I do standard exercises to help a child learn to sit, crawl, stand, etc. One exercise is to sit behind the baby, support his thighs and help him balance while he sits, always with something interesting in front of him. You are right to call it play. I want him to enjoy playing as I help strengthen his muscles. He doesn't need to think about it as work.

We also use standers, side lying positioners, PROM (passive Range of Motion), splints (AFOs, TLSOs, WHOs, etc.), and walkers. Walkers usually are positioned behind the child. All of this is ordered by the doctor, in the plan of care, and taught by the OT or PT therapists.

 

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