Any tips/ advice for Texas nursing schools?? Planning to relocate

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lioness1977

22 Posts

Specializes in Renal medsurg.

Come out for a visit first. Go to the campuses you are interested in. get a feel for the area. My family and I moved to texas from the west coast as well. As oregonians it has been a major culture shock for us. We have adjusted and I am 3/4 of the way through the ADN program. We ended up having to purchase a home in order for me to qualify for alot of the financial aid and scholarships that are offered at my school. Getting in was not hard, I finished my remaining 2 prereqs, applied and boom I'm in.

Just trust a person that knows what you are going through with the compitition out there. Feel it out real well first. Make sure you can handle the area for 2 plus years. :p

rosebud123

30 Posts

Culture shock? How so?? =) Good or bad??

I have been to Texas a few times... Dallas, Austin, and Houston... mainly for business. And I really do like the environment. However, I am sure nothing beats actually living there for a long time. I'm from California, San Francisco so I know it's going to be completely different. So I'm guessing since you bought a house, you're in Texas for the long haul??

So you had to buy a home, huh? Wow... is out-of-state tuition really that bad? Unfortunately, buying a home isn't in the cards for me. The reason why I am moving is that my boyfriend is relocating to Texas for work. But the good thing is that he has a choice of either Dallas, Austin, or Houston. He's not in the military so if we ever decide to get married, we don't get those benefits.

Can I ask what you school you go to? And when you say it wasn't hard, what do you mean? Is your GPA stellar? :yeah: If so, congrats! Do you like the school? And your program? From the posts here, I heard it's really competitive to get in.

lioness1977

22 Posts

Specializes in Renal medsurg.

My GPA was a 3.8 which is what made us decide to come south. You know as well as I do that it is impossible to get in with that low of a GPA. I had to buy a house to qualify for scholarships that are state run. I would highly suggest that if you can't buy a high get your residency changed before entering school. It will open up more than just loans and the Pell grant for you.

As far as culture, we come from a greener community, were recycling is a habit. Being polite to one another is natural and not forced. I have noticed a dramatic change in my teenagers since coming here.

The school is wonderful but it is in Lubbock. I don't think you would consider this area as it is 2 hours from Dallas and longer to San Antonio. I noticed that it is getting a bit more competitive here than it was when I entered. I know however I would not have gotten in without buying the house.

As far as being here for the long haul, probably not. Land is a good investment no matter what the economy is doing. Besides my mortgage is cheaper than the rent on a much smaller apartment, plus my youngest was able to paint her room without asking a landlord. :lol2: The people here think very differently is all. I loved the west coast mentality, very laid back and go with the flow. You talk about feeling the energy of the room and they all think your smokin something. :uhoh3:

rosebud123

30 Posts

I had to buy a house to qualify for scholarships that are state run. I would highly suggest that if you can't buy a high get your residency changed before entering school. It will open up more than just loans and the Pell grant for you.

If I am willing to pay the residency status, do you think that school's are still partial and give preference to residence? Would it be harder for me to get into? I already don't qualify for a Pell grant just because of my income. :crying2: But, I have to work because I've been trying to save up not to work during my time in school.

I heard the cost of living in Texas is great, though! I mean, I'm from the Bay Area and rent out here is insane.

Btw, I have a lower GPA than a 3.8! :crying2: I'm actually on another thread regarding this. It's not bad at all. I have a good pre-requisite grades, but my grades from when I was in college ten years weren't bad... but they weren't stellar either. So if I had to calculate my cum... it's not that competitive. I could re-take some classes, but many schools also say no repeats. Therefore, I'm kind of in a bind.

lioness1977

22 Posts

Specializes in Renal medsurg.

The residency status may have a large influence, depending on the area that you decide on. I know that here where I am preference is given to residency. You could posibbly work while geting your year needed for residency. As far as comp. in the school, it can be frowned upon to have low scores for your sciences and maths. If you need to retake those I reccomend you get a high B to an A the second time around.

Cost of living is much cheaper than the SF area, however, the big cities are higher prices as with any where. You still have your tax rate at 8.25% on all nonfood purchases. Keep that in mind.

Give it a shot, do your research, make sure to do a good visit with your final 3 I would say. Oh an get in touch with the counselors for the program you are interested in. They can be very helpful in telling you whether or not you stand a chance and what could improve your chances as well.

allnurses Guide

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

2 Articles; 6,840 Posts

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 12 years experience.

Some colleges only use the courses to calculate your GPA that actually apply to the nursing degree and ignore all the others, so even if your initial go at college was less than stellar, if you retake the classes that apply to the degree and do well on pre-req's you have a decent change. I go to one of the schools named in your list - getting in is difficult to say the least and is getting moreso, as the college has now partnered with TWU to offer nursing degrees all the way to Ph.D. level at the community college price structure and with automatic acceptance into those programs if you graduate and pass NCLEX. Applications soared 30% on this latest cycle.

So the best thing you can do at this point is start talking to counselors, having your transcripts sent over and get the nursing department to evaluate you for competitiveness with the average applicant. Usually they are pretty honest whether you have a real shot or not. Obviously there are no guarantees no matter where you go.