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Any hospitals out there using discharge lobbies/lounges?

Posted
pjdouble pjdouble (New) New

The hospital I work for recently opened a "discharge lobby" in order to expedite emptying beds for future admissions/post-ops. Frankly, I am not too thrilled at the prospect of sending my post-op day 2 discharges down to an area staffed only by a volunteer, prior to their leaving for home. Also, the area these patients are in is not exactly the most comfortable in the world. Our administration is really big on patient satisfaction, but I'm wondering what impression this leaves with our out-going customers. We are really being pushed into doing this (by a nursing committee with a very outspoken and determined chairperson) and the whole idea just doesn't sit well with me or my collegues. Anyone else having similar experiences? Also, anyone know where I can collect some data regarding discharge process and patient satisfaction? :crying2: :nurse:

I actually like the ideas of discharge lounges. If a patient needs a nurse to look after them, they are not ready to go home. If they are ready to go home, they should not be in a room preventing a PACU, ICU, ER, or Cath Lab patient from getting off an uncomfortable stretcher. A volunteer helping with phones, etc, is a nice touch. Hospitals are too full to have discharged patients sitting in beds because their ride home can't get there until 6pm. Discharge time used to be 11AM. I don't think a set time is a good idea but we need to keep those beds open for people who need them, not people who need a ride.

I don't want to sound harsh, but I think family members of people who are sitting in a lounge are more likely to come in than those whose family members are sitting in a room with a nurse and a call bell. I would never say to a patient "you need to be moving along now" but having a lounge is a nice idea.

The lounges should be comfortable, though- recliner chairs would be nice since people ready to go home are still not feeling great.

Sounds like a great idea if it is used appropriately. Our discharge pharmacy is extremely slow- on weekends it can take three hours to get discharge meds, and often this leaves an otherwise ok pt. sitting around to a while just waiting for meds.

Marie_LPN, RN, LPN, RN

Specializes in 5 yrs OR, ASU Pre-Op 2 yr. ER.

It doesn't make any sense to keep pts. in the hospital if they supposedly don't need a nurse.

Sounds like $$$ is the idea for that.

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

I've seen people hang onto their beds for hours after discharge. My ride is coming at 2pm, oh, they can come at 4pm when they've picked up the kids... the excuses can go on for ages. By the way nurse, can you get me a tray because I need a snack. Discharged is discharged.

I've seen patients asked to wait in a lounge because their bed was needed. But the Hilton priciple comes into play, I need meds because I haven't filled my prescription because my ride hasn't got here yet, bring me my lunch... When does the idea sink in that discharge means you are in a condition that no longer requires hospitalization???

I've seen people hang onto their beds for hours after discharge. My ride is coming at 2pm, oh, they can come at 4pm when they've picked up the kids... the excuses can go on for ages. By the way nurse, can you get me a tray because I need a snack. Discharged is discharged.

I've seen patients asked to wait in a lounge because their bed was needed. But the Hilton priciple comes into play, I need meds because I haven't filled my prescription because my ride hasn't got here yet, bring me my lunch... When does the idea sink in that discharge means you are in a condition that no longer requires hospitalization???

...I waited all day to go home. It wasn't because there was no ride. In fact, my "ride" had to wait all day for them to discharge me. MD rounded at 7am -- "you can probably go home today" (Yeah!!!!)--but, said doc had to write the discharge meds and they had to be picked up at the pharmacy. How much of holding up beds is because of this, or because rides haven't arrived? I didn't get out of there until...oh, 4pm. I would NOT have been a happy camper if I'd had to wait to eat until then...especially considering I had just started on solid food....can you say ... "HUNGRY!!!!"

Personally, I hope risk management (the lawyers) take a good hard look at discharge lounges. Sounds like there's potential for too many problems, to me...

NurseFirst

anc33

Specializes in Oncology, Research. Has 7 years experience.

We have a "discharge transition unit" staffed by a nurse and a tech. They can give meds, do discharge teaching, etc. It's a great resource.

General E. Speaking, RN, RN

Specializes in floor to ICU.

We had a pt who's family was late picking them up...needless to say, the pt. fell and broke their hip in the room. Big mess because the patient was discharged and only waiting on a ride...administration was upset when they found out the nurse had given the d/c papers hours before. It puts the nurse in an awkward position. Yes, they are discharged but we can't just ignore them, or roll them out on the sidewalk. As long as they are in the room, I feel responsible. I think a d/c lounge is a good idea.

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