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Any advice for a New Nurse?

Nurses   (210 Views | 7 Replies)

DribbleKing97 specializes in ACE.

52 Profile Views; 17 Posts

I am a new Nurse and I start next week at a Nursing Home all by myself. Its gonna feel different because when I was in my clinical I always had a Nurse my preceptor to ask questions if I was not sure and working under her license. Now its my license, and I felt like she did a lot of the work without me knowing and I just gave the meds and such.

 

I am just afraid of forgetting something like writing down who had a fall, forgetting to sign the narcotics, forgetting to follow up someone on A/B therapy, or needs laxatives cause its always so busy in there.

 

Any advice to reduce the stress? I also am very emotionally frail, families are rude and some staff as well.

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Cyra-Lea Drummond has 17 years experience and specializes in Cardiac health.

1 Article; 8 Posts; 280 Profile Views

Will you be the only licensed nurse on shift, or will there be others working with you? Don't be afraid to ask questions. If you are afraid of forgetting things, find a system of organization that works for you. I used a checklist system for my patients. At the beginning of my shift, I would make a list of items that needed to be addressed for the day and check them off as they were completed.

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DribbleKing97 specializes in ACE.

17 Posts; 52 Profile Views

Thanks for your response. There is 1 other RPN and an RN (supervisor). I just hope they won't be too busy for me and such. I do not want to risk my license.

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Cyra-Lea Drummond has 17 years experience and specializes in Cardiac health.

1 Article; 8 Posts; 280 Profile Views

I understand your concern. Do not hesitate to ask questions, even if your co-workers seem busy. Looking back, there were times as a new nurse I should have asked for help, and I didn't. Bad things happened as a result. Patient safety must be a priority, and new nurses can not be expected to know everything! Best of luck to you.

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DribbleKing97 specializes in ACE.

17 Posts; 52 Profile Views

Thank you! The reason I asked this was because as a Student the clinical instructors and the college made it seem catastrophic if you did not know anything, and if you asked for help they would rate you as a bad student and you would fail. But I then realize in the workplace its much different.

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Rose_Queen has 15 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

9 Followers; 4 Articles; 9,265 Posts; 107,692 Profile Views

38 minutes ago, DribbleKing97 said:

and working under her license

Actually, you were never under her license. Common misconception, but the reality is that the only person working on a license is the person whose name appears printed on it. Students work under the exception rule.

 

39 minutes ago, DribbleKing97 said:

I felt like she did a lot of the work without me knowing and I just gave the meds and such.

You truly learn how to be a nurse in your first job. Make sure you get an adequate orientation. Check out the first year after licensure forum under the career tab for some tips and advice that others have given.

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"nursy" has 40 years experience as a RN and specializes in ICU, ER, Home Health, Corrections, School Nurse.

240 Posts; 1,005 Profile Views

On 2/12/2020 at 4:28 PM, DribbleKing97 said:

Thank you! The reason I asked this was because as a Student the clinical instructors and the college made it seem catastrophic if you did not know anything, and if you asked for help they would rate you as a bad student and you would fail. But I then realize in the workplace its much different.

I can tell you right now that what WILL get you in trouble is NOT asking questions.  The first year of nursing is always about learning how to be a nurse, and it can be overwhelming.  You don't always have to bother fellow nurses with questions,  however.  Medication questions can be answered by a pharmacist.  A lot of stuff can be looked up on line.   If you watch the providers, they pretty much look up EVERYTHING  on their phones theses days.  There will be times when you forget things that you really already know, but for some reason you just draw a blank.  It's OK to say to a fellow nurse "hey, I know I know this, but I'm having a brain fart.....how do you.....etc etc"   Believe me, we all juggle so much stuff in our heads, we all have a brain fart sometimes.   Always listen to your little inner voice when it nags you about something that you are hesitant about....double check whatever it is. And, like a previous poster said, keep some sort of check list where you sign off tasks.  You absolutely cannot keep everything in your head. No matter what, your first year will be hard, but everyone gets through it, and you will too.  Good luck!

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LibraNurse27 has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Community Health, Med/Surg, ICU Stepdown.

219 Posts; 3,234 Profile Views

Congrats on your first job! I agree with all above, it is always worth the awkwardness of asking a question. Even if a coworker responds with annoyance or belittles you for not knowing (which they should not!), dealing with that is better than making a bad mistake and all that comes with that. Also as a new nurse it is hard to deal with angry patients and family members. Over time you learn not to take it personally and realize that many people act out when they are in stressful situations and feel a lack of control. I wish you the best! Report back with any questions or updates 😃

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