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Advice for new grad starting in L&D???

Ob/Gyn   (1,022 Views 4 Comments)
by darthsunshine darthsunshine (Member)

darthsunshine has 9 years experience and specializes in OR.

2,122 Profile Views; 51 Posts

Hi all, I'm new to this forum--just graduated with my BSN and passed my NCLEX and now beginning my REAL job on Tuesday on the L&D floor in a Level 1 Trauma Center Hospital.

My question is what advice do you have for a BRAND NEW RN beginning in L&D?

My orientation is 6 weeks (I've already read here that 6 weeks is too short an orientation--that is out of my control--and am looking for positive advice for me), our patient ratio is 2:1--and everyone I know who has done clinicals or worked on that floor think the RNs there are an amazing team and train others well....and the nurse I'm precepting with I've heard is AMAZING (YAY!)

I'm so excited--and humbled I'm starting in my favorite specialty--and want to be the best L&D nurse :D

So....suggestions? Thanks for taking the time to answer this.... :D

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Montessori Mommy specializes in L & D.

231 Posts; 3,934 Profile Views

I don't have any advice, since I'm a new grad starting on L & D tomorrow! Just wanted to say best of luck to you!! Getting a position in L & D is almost impossible you are a new grad, so we have to be confident that the managers who hired us saw something they liked.....

The best advice I've gotten is:

arrive early, be positive, seek and take advice from your experienced coworkers, and be kind to your patients! Even if we don't know a lot about L & D nursing yet, we can hold a hand, rub a back and help a laboring mom relax.

Let us know how your first day goes....

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KellNY is a RN and specializes in High Risk In Patient OB/GYN.

710 Posts; 7,476 Profile Views

Sorry that my advice to post your question here (where there is more traffic) and my concern that 6 weeks was too short of an orientation was too negative.

:uhoh21:

So, positive happy suggestions? Volunteer to go in on EVERY type of case. Especially the ones you don't like. That means IUFDs, TOPs, births with fetal anomalies, and other relatively unusal or unpleasant cases.

NSVDs and routine C/s are a dime a dozen, and although no two are identical, you have plenty of time to just get used to the norm. But it's best that you're exposed to the difficult (emotionally and procedurally) cases while still on orientation. So not only will you look like you're taking the initiative and not trying to just get the happy endings (which everyone loves!), you'll also get valuable experience.

Also, try to take as many inservices/CEUs as you can-especially in cultural care, prematurity (MoD often has free seminars on prematurity related topics), grief and loss, HIV/AIDS, etc.

Most of the stuff you need to know just comes from common sense and experience or a combo of the two. Know your limits. If you're not sure, ask. If you need help, speak up. Know that not every patient will like you, and you can't help that. Find a good medium on what you want to invest emotionally into each case (ie finding a balance between not caring at all and pouring your heart's energy into every woman who walks through the door).

**Remember that pregnancy and birth are normal phases of life and not medical conditions. A pregnancy/birth should be considered normal until proven otherwise, not the other way around.

Best Wishes

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darthsunshine has 9 years experience and specializes in OR.

51 Posts; 2,122 Profile Views

No worries KellNY, and thanks for the advice! :) (I was already thinking since my orientation was so short I'd try and get to see everything I could...)

Thanks again! :D

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