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ADN lower than BSN????

LPN-RN   (1,179 Views 5 Comments)
by litebrightgirl litebrightgirl (New Member) New Member

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Hello everyone. I'm an LPN and have been for a year. I was talking to someone who's in a ADN program (which I'm considering), that getting her ADN will soon be a waste of time. She says her instructors are telling her that ADN will be looked at as being lower than BSN and those with ADN will have to get their BSN. She also says the instructors will be teaching the ADN classes differently than BSN classes. Just wanted to know if anyone else has heard this??????

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itsmejuli works as a Home Care Supervisor.

1 Article; 18,654 Visitors; 2,188 Posts

A BSN is always an advantage.

I"m an LPN in RN transition this year. I'll be continuing straight into the BSN program when I've completed the ADN.

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AprilRNurse has 3 years experience.

3,569 Visitors; 186 Posts

Hello everyone. I'm an LPN and have been for a year. I was talking to someone who's in a ADN program (which I'm considering), that getting her ADN will soon be a waste of time. She says her instructors are telling her that ADN will be looked at as being lower than BSN and those with ADN will have to get their BSN. She also says the instructors will be teaching the ADN classes differently than BSN classes. Just wanted to know if anyone else has heard this??????

I'm hearing this as well. IT's just basic supply and demand. With the economy being down- more people are out of work and looking for a quick degree (or just something to do since they aren't working) Nursing schools are turning out alot of students- who are unable to find work. Hospitals are having their pick of the lot- so of course they'll go with the highest education.

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NurseCubanitaRN2b works as a Back To School.

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What the above poster state is very true. But keep in mind that you will take the same NCLEX as the BSN. For me, I just want my RN. If I get into a AND program I'm going, and I already have a BA in another field. My goal is to get my MSN. I'm willing to do RN-MSN and my BA will come in handy for general education towards my BSN\MSN. Either way I still need my BSN. Don't let that stop you from getting your AND. Its definately a good stepping stone. Having your BSN will allow you to apply for management positions. In this economy it's not a good idea as those positions are non-unioned and they aren't protected as much as unioned staff nurses.

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10,202 Visitors; 535 Posts

Hello everyone. I'm an LPN and have been for a year. I was talking to someone who's in a ADN program (which I'm considering), that getting her ADN will soon be a waste of time. She says her instructors are telling her that ADN will be looked at as being lower than BSN and those with ADN will have to get their BSN. She also says the instructors will be teaching the ADN classes differently than BSN classes. Just wanted to know if anyone else has heard this??????

I think they are only looking down on it because the job market it tight, there are hiring freezes and layoffs, and canceled expansion plans, and mandatory overtime, and still new grads from colleges looking for jobs. And a host of other things going on, so that the employers can be very choosy about whom they hire. It's not a waste of time to get an ADRN and your license, then continue on. If you get a job with it, great! You can earn money, and possibly get the employer to pay for an online BSRN completer degree.

My advice to anyone in a ADRN program is while you are there, take ALL of the extra courses that you can possibly get toward a BSRN. Abnormal psych, statistics, etc. 12-18 credits is full time, and some schools let you take 18 without extra fees, or even 21 for a small extra fee. If you can cram them in there, it might save you some money and effort later. This is especially true for those of you who don't have to work while you're in school. Take all that you can take, because it's like getting courses fro free if you can piggyback them into your same full-time semester cost.

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