Nursing in France Nursing in France - pg.12 | allnurses

Nursing in France - page 12

Is there anyone who can fill me in on RN jobs in France. I prefer the city hospiitals, I work in ICU currently. I have many years exp in Med Surg also. Would like to hear from someone. If you... Read More

  1. Visit  akdennis58 profile page
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    The information I have gotten in the past from others indicates it's very difficult for foreign trained nurses to relocate to France for work. My understanding is that it would require a year or more of training in one of their nursing programs and a very advanced capability in the French language. For informational purposes, you might try this website to start getting some info: infirmiers.com (I have no connection with that website other than being a member). I'm in the process of obtaining in registration in the UK so that I can work in England and spend some of my free time in France; sort of a roundabout way to spend some time there. Good luck.
  2. Visit  JessicaNC profile page
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    Thank you,
    I don't think it will be that difficult though, I'm already in a france university.
    Ive obtained all my education in french.
    Although, you are right about the extra year or two in their training.
    I also heard something about a different enterance exam to see where you are in the nursing field?
  3. Visit  JessicaNC profile page
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    I meant to say french university.
    sorry.
  4. Visit  akdennis58 profile page
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    So the language will be the least of your difficulties then. Yes, that's what I've heard. I've heard that you would have to take an exam to evaluate your education in the field and that a person would still likely be required to take a year of training in one of their education programs before being allowed to practise. You should enjoy that website I mentioned; it's in French.
  5. Visit  Silverdragon102 profile page
    0
    Quote from JessicaNC
    Hey everyone,
    I'm currently a first year RN student at Laurentian university in sudbury, ontario.
    Im really interested in going to France, for my last year, so im looking into a international program.
    Does anyone know what to do?
    I dont have very much to work with here, so im trying to find answers.
    Id love to move to France and work there, I do not plan on staying in Canada.
    What do I do, to complete this?
    any information will help, thanks!

    -Jessica
    I would suggest you check that it is OK to do your final years training in another country/university. French nurse training may be done differently to Canada which may have an impact on qualifying
  6. Visit  *****guest***** profile page
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    hi , i am new to this site. I am planning to move to France, possibly in the south. i am a psyhiatric nurse with 14 years experience and trained in Uk. Is it easy to find a job in the Public hospitals? I would appreciate any help. Thanks
  7. Visit  Incantatem profile page
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    Quote from DavidFR
    I've lived and worked in France since 2001.

    To register your qualification here you need to go in person to your local health and social security department (listed in the yellow pages as the DDASS). You must speak fluent French, and if you don't you will be refused registration as an IDE (Infirmier Diplm d'Etat). People with European Union qualifications have the right to register straight off. You must present your original certificates with a French translation stamped by an official interpreter approved by your embassy. Others often need to work as Aide Soignants (nurses aides, care assistants) while they work for the French qualification.

    Compared to my homeland (the UK) nursing here is paradise. They think they have a crisis, but it's nothing compared to the UK. The public health system here repeatedly comes top of international league tables and it's easy to see why. It's well funded and well resourced. Things such as waiting lists for surgery just don't exist as they do in the UK.

    Everyone in France works a 35 hour week. Holiday entitlements are good (around six weeks plus the 13 public holidays). Pay is not amazing, but you earn enough to live on and the benefits are good (pension, travel allowance etc.) Public hospitals have a reputation for paying better than private clinics, who often skimp to make their profit. The public sector functions in an almost "money no object" fashion, which is beginning to change. Taxes here are high, but you get what you pay for - a good health service, good schools, excellent public transport and civic amenities.

    Most nurses work a fixed shift (mornings, afternoons or nights) with some places having implemented the long day/night (12 hours). Your meal breaks are paid, and many hospitals provide you with a free meal on duty. Very few places have shift rotation between night and day like in the UK. You're usually either a morning nurse, an afternoon nurse or a night nurse. IDE (registered nurse) levels are low but you always have a good number of Aide soignants to support you, and they are trained to a high level - they can generally be trusted to get on with the basic care. The nurses job here is more focused on the technical tasks - drugs, IVs, bloods etc. Nursing here is still very task orientated (something I personally like). Nurses here are very efficient, but perhaps lack the 'personal touch' of anglo-saxon culture. It's a different relationship here - the patient sees you more as a professional and maintains an almost formal respect which I think British patients no longer have.

    In larger cities agency nursing is possible and is well paid. The shortage of nurses here means there is always agency work. Recruitment of foreign nurses is becoming increasingly common.

    Many nurses here set up in their own practices (Infirmiers librals) You go to these nurses with all your prescptions for things like dresings, injections etc. Practice nurses don't exist and less happens in outpatients than in the UK, so these nurses fulfil that role, as well as providing homecare like the British district nurse.

    If you speak English there are increasingly opprtunities for bi-lingual nurses in international companies and NGO's. There are both an American and a Franco-British hospital just outside Paris catering largely to ex-pats. Bi-lingual posts always pay better, you can really sell your English here, but you must speak good French too.

    Personally, I love life here and would recomend it to anybody. The French, I feel, get an unfairly bad press abroad. Once you penetrate this society you realise what a warm race of people they are. The pace of life here (even in Paris) is slow and civilised. There is a very rich cultural life here and the food and wine of course are unbeatable. Working life is very civilised; due to the socialist cullture and strong unions things are very much weighted in the employees favour. Nursing care here is good; medical standards are high. I would say go for it.

    I am currently becoming fluent in french thanks to several years of courses and such, always wanted to work in France, but can you please let me know if there is a "nursing board" in France that oversees all nurses in the country? Exactly what is the process to apply for a license to work? I'm slightly confused. Thank you.
  8. Visit  *****guest***** profile page
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    Thanks for your reply and is much appreciated. Hope to move their soon. Cheers
  9. Visit  Fred_IDE profile page
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    Quote from Incantatem
    I am currently becoming fluent in french thanks to several years of courses and such, always wanted to work in France, but can you please let me know if there is a "nursing board" in France that oversees all nurses in the country? Exactly what is the process to apply for a license to work? I'm slightly confused. Thank you.
    Hi,
    yes there is a nursing board in France now : Ordre National des Infirmiers (ONI)
    http://www.ordre-infirmiers.fr/
  10. Visit  LoveANurse09 profile page
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    Great thread and happy to see the same people are around after a couple of years! So it appears the best option for me as a US trained RN would be to work in Geneva and commute from France? Anyone have information on hospitals in Geneva or Swiss Agencies? Also can you obtain a work visa if you are not actually working in France but Geneva?
    Merci Beaucoup!
  11. Visit  heidihiuk profile page
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    hey! I have a question that's related to this discussion.

    I'm a newly qualified nurse in the UK and would like to move to france as soon as possible. Does anyone know how much experience i need as a nurse in england for me to be able to get a job in france? I am hoping that working 6 months in the UK is enough. Let me know if you have any idea!

    Thanks.
  12. Visit  Fred_IDE profile page
    0
    Quote from heidihiuk
    hey! I have a question that's related to this discussion.

    I'm a newly qualified nurse in the UK and would like to move to france as soon as possible. Does anyone know how much experience i need as a nurse in england for me to be able to get a job in france? I am hoping that working 6 months in the UK is enough. Let me know if you have any idea!

    Thanks.

    Hi, you don't need any experience to get a job in France, you have an European diploma it is enough to work.
    But you have to speak French !
  13. Visit  DAN256 RN profile page
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    Hey,

    Im a irish Rn and have now been living and working (in a bar) in France for the last year and now want to get back into nursing! I know i can register straight away, well i think so but what i dont know is what level of french do i need?

    I can understand almost everything and can hold a conversation in french but dont have much medical terms yet.
    I was thinking to register and then start working in a lab taking bloods which would be easier than full nursing on the wards, less to get wrong!

    Is this a good idea, or would i have to do a french exam before they let me loose?

    Thanks a mill,
    Dan

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