MSN Education question

  1. Hi,

    I was wondering if the MSN Education coursework was geared towards traditional academic settings (teaching in a classroom) or towards professional development (teaching nurses within the workplace)? Can anyone give a bit more details on what the Education classes were like? Is this program customized to your own interest? Thanks
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    It is geared more toward an academic educator role, but (when I was enrolled) there were multiple courses in which your papers and such could be geared toward professional development/ hospital educator. I think you will find this in most MSN programs, not just WGU's.
  4. by   CFrancine
    Thanks. I know this seems to be the norm. Since WGU is less structured and requires you you to do projects in the workplace (nm at the the bsn) wasn't sure if it was more flexible.
  5. by   llg
    If you decide to attend a program geared for academic education, try to incorporate the ANPD standards, practice model, etc. into your projects. Don't just use the academic education standards and apply them to your NPD projects. Actually incorporate the NPD foundation into your work.

    Most academic faculty don't know much (if anything) about the NPD stuff, so be prepared to seek and apply that material on your own. When the time comes for practicums, look for a preceptor who is knowledgeable about the NPD practice model, scope of practice, standards of practice, etc.

    Good luck!
  6. by   CFrancine
    Great idea! Thanks!
  7. by   CFrancine
    llg,

    I just looked over the website and the ANPD sponsors a scholarship here exclusively for active ANPD members. I don't know how common that is but it makes me feel the organization likes the school. So that's a good sign.

    In case anyone was wondering, I found out there's no required "student teaching". So practicum can be based in the workplace.
    Last edit by CFrancine on Jul 24
  8. by   llg
    I have nothing against WGU -- and have had friends go there who liked it. However, the fact that any particular organization or hospital offers a discount to a certain doesn't usually mean much. It's usually a straight business deal between a school and an organization/employer. The school pays the organization money (or gives a discount or scholarship) in exchange for the advertising it receives on the organization/employer's website. I wouldn't read too much into those types of deals.

    Also, I would be wary of any program that did not include any kind of practicum in its curriculum. I've run into an increasing number of online programs that are no longer any application of what is taught. It's all "book learning" and imaginary papers, etc. that discuss what you might do in a real situation -- but providing no actual experience implementing any of the ideas. I'd be very hesitant to hire someone who had zero experience doing what they were supposed to be knowledgeable about. I believe a good education includes at least some clinical application. I wonder how long some of those schools who have stopped including any practicums will retain their accreditation.
  9. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from llg
    I have nothing against WGU -- and have had friends go there who liked it. However, the fact that any particular organization or hospital offers a discount to a certain doesn't usually mean much. It's usually a straight business deal between a school and an organization/employer. The school pays the organization money (or gives a discount or scholarship) in exchange for the advertising it receives on the organization/employer's website. I wouldn't read too much into those types of deals.

    Also, I would be wary of any program that did not include any kind of practicum in its curriculum. I've run into an increasing number of online programs that are no longer any application of what is taught. It's all "book learning" and imaginary papers, etc. that discuss what you might do in a real situation -- but providing no actual experience implementing any of the ideas. I'd be very hesitant to hire someone who had zero experience doing what they were supposed to be knowledgeable about. I believe a good education includes at least some clinical application. I wonder how long some of those schools who have stopped including any practicums will retain their accreditation.
    There is a practicum w/ all WGU MSN degrees.
  10. by   llg
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    There is a practicum w/ all WGU MSN degrees.
    That's great to hear. I've had friends who felt they got a good education there and I was hoping that they weren't going "down hill." These "no practicum" programs (undergrad or grad) seem like they are going too far for me.
  11. by   CFrancine
    Yes, sorry for the confusion. What I meant by "student teaching" is being required to teach a college class. My practicum can be focused on teaching nurses in the work place and working along side a nurse educator.
  12. by   not.done.yet
    I definitely had a very intense practicum experience earning my MSN through WGU
  13. by   kidzcare
    I just started the MSN-education on Sept 1 and my mentor told me that there is a new requirement involving needing to find a preceptor at a local college. Does anyone know any more about this?
  14. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from kidzcare
    I just started the MSN-education on Sept 1 and my mentor told me that there is a new requirement involving needing to find a preceptor at a local college. Does anyone know any more about this?
    Your SM is the very best source of information regarding policies. ALWAYS get it straight from them.

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