IS your facility prepared to provide 72hrs emergency care re disaster/terrorism?

  1. 0
    from advance for nurses: jan 20, 2005

    read:

    72 hours by vern enge
    is your facility prepared to provide 72 hours of solo emergency care in the wake of a natural disaster or terrorist attack?


    this is your life on a daily basis, more or less: you eat, walk the dog, bathe, dress, go to work, come home, try to accomplish a few routine household tasks, and then get a little shut-eye just in time to do it all over again the next day. itís a modus operandi you typically cycle through three times in the course of 3 days without much fanfare or excitement.

    but what if disaster struck? what if you suddenly are faced with a full-fledged catastrophe that, in addition to your routine nursing workload, means you are about to be confronted with an onslaught of patients, for which your facility may be the only healthcare oasis available in your area for the next 72 hours?

    full story


    also see: aftermath of disaster
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jan 22, '05
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  3. 4 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Thanks for sharing that article. Gives you something else to think about.
    72 hours would be horrendous. Staff worn out, supplies exhausted, etc.
    I have just taken BDLS, HEICS and CERT training, and I'll tell you, from what I have seen, and been told, we are not prepared! Not just us as medical care providers, but us, police, fire and society.
    Can we ever be completely ready....no, I doubt it, but I think we are making progress.
    One thing about the 72 hours issue, if a disaster happens, staff on duty will want to leave, many won't or can't report. The loss of electricity, water and sewer, etc....it's just amazing the possibilities.
    At our hospital, one of my concerns is contamination. The EMS will decontam. just fine, but the ones that walk in.....oh boy.
    We had a small explosion at a factory near by recently. The supervisor collected two walking wounded, and they walked right up to our triage area, covered in white powder. Too late now!!!
    Mike
  5. 0
    Were having a 72 hour practice drill in May and weve all already been told that no can go out of town during that 72 hours. I think that's asking way too much of a whole hospital of employees! If there were a real emergency not everyone would be in town so I don't get it?
  6. 0
    Dutch
    I agree, that sound like a big request to make on the staff.
    However, if given enough warning (this is a drill after all), this could be a very eye opening experience for everyone up and down the chain of command.
    Yes, the situation is a bit unreal, with a warning and all, but, hey, you have to start some where.
    You are getting compensated, right??? If so, how??
    Post back, I would be interested on details.
    Mike
  7. 0
    Quote from mcmike55
    Dutch
    I agree, that sound like a big request to make on the staff.
    However, if given enough warning (this is a drill after all), this could be a very eye opening experience for everyone up and down the chain of command.
    Yes, the situation is a bit unreal, with a warning and all, but, hey, you have to start some where.
    You are getting compensated, right??? If so, how??
    Post back, I would be interested on details.
    Mike
    No compensation has been offered or mentioned. I doubt there will be any. If I were to win a free trip good during that time period......I'm gone! They would just have to understand and I feel sure they would.


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