Utah RN pay, Salt Lake City area - page 3

by PACNWNURSING 47,937 Views | 45 Comments

Why are the RN salaries lower than other similar sized Western cities? Denver pays more why? Please do not say cost of living, because Intermountain does not take cost of living into consideration when considering salary. Just... Read More


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    21.80 an hour is not a livable wage to purchase a home, feed, cloth and have money to put away for a family four in Utah. The housing cost in Utah is not cheap. Staying in Utah to make 30,0000 less a year does not make any sense. Just because IHC is a not for profit does not mean they should not be paying nursing wages that reflect the market. I am going back to Washington State to work for a non for profit and will be making a much larger salary with better benefits. The hospital is listed as one of the top 50 hospitals in the country. Not one IHC hospital is listed. IHC is clearly indirectly controlling the nursing salaries in the entire state of Utah. This has been confirmed by many local Utah nurses. So stay, bury your head the salt lake flats and allow nursing salaries to continue to stay way behind the current salary trends in nursing. Nurses in Utah are way too silent. Being a leader in reducing cost does not necessarily mean a better employer for nurses.
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    Quote from PACNWNURSING
    21.80 an hour is not a livable wage to purchase a home, feed, cloth and have money to put away for a family four in Utah. The housing cost in Utah is not cheap. Staying in Utah to make 30,0000 less a year does not make any sense. Just because IHC is a not for profit does not mean they should not be paying nursing wages that reflect the market. I am going back to Washington State to work for a non for profit and will be making a much larger salary with better benefits. The hospital is listed as one of the top 50 hospitals in the country. Not one IHC hospital is listed. IHC is clearly indirectly controlling the nursing salaries in the entire state of Utah. This has been confirmed by many local Utah nurses. So stay, bury your head the salt lake flats and allow nursing salaries to continue to stay way behind the current salary trends in nursing. Nurses in Utah are way too silent. Being a leader in reducing cost does not necessarily mean a better employer for nurses.
    First of all $21.80 and hour if working full time is more than $40,000 per year not less than $30,000.00 and it is certainly possible to purchase a home, food, and clothing. My family of five managed to do so on far less than that prior to my graduation from Nursing school. You might not be able to live in a dream home or wear designer clothing, but if your capable of budgeting it is a completely livable wage.

    Second, the wages in Utah do reflect the market comparible wages. If you refer to the Unites States Bureau of Labor Statistics you will see that Utahs wages are on the low end, but the wages are comparible to several other states including; Idaho, Florida, Georgia, North and South Carolina, etc. In fact there are states listed as having lower wages on average.

    Utah on average happens to have lower wages then other states in most fields. It is not Utah Specific. Engineer's in Utah (gosh I hope engineering is not considered women's work) tend to make $10,000 to $20,000 less per year then in other states as well.
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    The bottom line is nurses get paid more for doing the same exact job in other states. I would rather be making 30,000 more a year and have more financial freedom than dealing with Utahs lower salaries across the board. Of course its your choice. 21.80 an hour or 34.29 an hour, I will take the 34.29 an hour, thank you.
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    I am very interested, what state are you able to make $34 an hour? I realize Utah doesn't pay well. My mom in North Idaho (Coeur d'Alene) stated that nurses with 1 yr exp make $25-28 hr depending on which shift you work. This is at a hospital. Another way to make great money is to work in Abu Dhabi, you get your furnished housing, medical and plane tickets paid for and tax free high wages. Sounds pretty nice.
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    Quote from ovnerati
    First of all $21.80 and hour if working full time is more than $40,000 per year not less than $30,000.00 and it is certainly possible to purchase a home, food, and clothing. My family of five managed to do so on far less than that prior to my graduation from Nursing school. You might not be able to live in a dream home or wear designer clothing, but if your capable of budgeting it is a completely livable wage.

    Second, the wages in Utah do reflect the market comparable wages. If you refer to the Unites States Bureau of Labor Statistics you will see that Utah's wages are on the low end, but the wages are comparable to several other states including; Idaho, Florida, Georgia, North and South Carolina, etc. In fact there are states listed as having lower wages on average.

    Utah on average happens to have lower wages then other states in most fields. It is not Utah Specific. Engineer's in Utah (gosh I hope engineering is not considered women's work) tend to make $10,000 to $20,000 less per year then in other states as well.
    I'm sorry, but you can not see the forest from the trees. Living in Utah all your life makes you an expert on comparable wages? I think not. Those of us who actually have lived and worked out of state, as well as in Utah, have a better perspective. We're talking about states like Wyoming and Idaho that have a similar cost of living compared to Utah and yet somehow manage to offer better wages than Utah does.

    If you think that $22/hour is a fair wage, you are part of the problem. Seriously. Living on 40k/year after completing a BSN is NOT ideal. Particularly when nurses in other part of the country make far more for the same amount of work. And if a family of 5 is able to live comfortably on 40k/year, they are able to do so by benefiting from tax credits, that many of us who are single or without kids do not benefit from.

    Utah needs a nursing union! (like that would ever happen, hah)
    lindarn and PACNWNURSING like this.
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    Quote from everwonder_y
    I'm sorry, but you can not see the forest from the trees. Living in Utah all your life makes you an expert on comparable wages? I think not. Those of us who actually have lived and worked out of state, as well as in Utah, have a better perspective. We're talking about states like Wyoming and Idaho that have a similar cost of living compared to Utah and yet somehow manage to offer better wages than Utah does.

    If you think that $22/hour is a fair wage, you are part of the problem. Seriously. Living on 40k/year after completing a BSN is NOT ideal. Particularly when nurses in other part of the country make far more for the same amount of work. And if a family of 5 is able to live comfortably on 40k/year, they are able to do so by benefiting from tax credits, that many of us who are single or without kids do not benefit from.

    Utah needs a nursing union! (like that would ever happen, hah)
    Amen to the Union that will be the only way wages and beneftis will get fixed. Nurses who have never left Utah are clueless on how much less they get paid. I am finally back here in Washington and I love it. Making a liveable wage with a much better schedule. Hospitals without nurses would never survive, we hold the power and need to use it wisely.
    everwonder_y and lindarn like this.
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    I agree, the Utah market is tough. I had to move to get my foot in the door.

    I graduated from Weber State's Associates of Nursing program last winter (2010). I applied to work at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee and got in. I'm working on Vanderbilt's SICU floor right now, but my hopes are that with a year of Vanderbilt ICU under my belt, and with ACLS, PALS and CCRN certifications, maybe I can land a job at an IHC or U of U facility.

    By the way, Tennessee sucks for pay too. I make $19.50/hr.

    You can definitely make more money in other states. The highest paying states I've seen are California, Oregon, Massachussetts and New York. Obviously with Cali and NY, you're going to be paying a lot more to live there. Of course, this also depends on what kind of nursing environment in which you work. If you work in Home Health you can make good money, and it's pretty cushy compared to 12 hour shifts on the floor.

    I think my situation would be different if I had family out here in Tennessee or if I were married. Being a single guy out here by myself, I really am missing my family and my old crew back in Utah.
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    Congratulations and Good luck to you nurseman78! I've read good things about Vanderbilt's internship for new grads (if that's what you're doing?); sounds like a great experience. Though, sorry to hear about the pay.

    Hang in there and keep us posted!

    It seams like the best bet, in the current environment, is to get a tech job in a hospital while you're in nursing school, so that when you graduate you can move into a nursing position at that facility. That's what I've been hearing anyway.
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    Look at the midwest. I make almost 45/hour, I have been a nurse for almost 17 years and have a MS degree
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    Yep, getting a CNA/tech job in a hospital while in nursing school definitely gives you a leg up, both in terms of organizing your time as an RN and in helping you land a hospital job. But landing a CNA job in a hospital is often just as tough as landing an RN job in a hospital. You do what you have to do, I suppose.


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