Why do staff nurses resent us?

  1. Hi I do travel nursing right now.

    Although I get on well with the other nurses most of the time, I get more help from the other travel nurses on the floor.
    Sometimes there is an attitude of "sink or swim".....

    Why?

    When I was staff I was glad to see travel nurses - more help.
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   RRN
    Quote from VanillaPalamino
    Hi I do travel nursing right now.

    Although I get on well with the other nurses most of the time, I get more help from the other travel nurses on the floor.
    Sometimes there is an attitude of "sink or swim".....

    Why?

    When I was staff I was glad to see travel nurses - more help.

    One reason is called $$$$...

    Another reason is they have no vested interest in you..
  4. by   caroladybelle
    It depends on the locale. Northern(NYC/Philly) facilities have generally treated me well, thrilled to have a good nurse and more hands to the do the job.

    Some Florida facilities tend to treat us like leeches (And I went to school here!!!!!!).

    Part of it is the money, though quite frankly, the pay rate for travelers here is lousy....regular staff pay is worse. But you figure in the inconvenience, the lack of sick pay, less ability to control your schedule, lack of vacation pay, first float every shift...the pay is not all that good.

    Also, travelers ocasionally decline to do things, due to lack of knowledge, worries about safety or falls out of nurses ability. For example, I recently declined to TPA/Talc a double chest tube... on a nonICU floor...on a full code. Some nurses have in their contract as to how many patients that they can take and will force the issue if they get pushed...staff frequently does not have that perogative. Some nurses will automatically renew narc orders, though their are no SOs for that, because "their MDs prefer it", yet the traveler may not because it is not legal.

    It can irritate both sides.
  5. by   fergus51
    Quote from RRN
    One reason is called $$$$...

    Another reason is they have no vested interest in you..
    And you have no vested interest in them. I really like our travellers and I don't resent them and help them when I can, but at the same time I don't feel bad for them if they complain about no PTO or being made to float. They chose their job and I chose mine. The sink or swim attitude... I don't know exactly what you mean, but I do expect travellers to be able to swim. We can't invest time handholding, that's why they get the perks they do (because the hospital is supposed to be getting an experienced nurse who can swim). I would resent travellers if they showed up on the unit and didn't know what they were doing with basic assignments.
  6. by   VanillaPalamino
    at the same time I don't feel bad for them if they complain about no PTO or being made to float.
    Uh, I have no idea why a travel nurse would complain about floating or no PTO.
    I was talking about coming onto a floor and needing to know where supplies are, and such.

  7. by   barefootlady
    I am sorry you have experienced this lack of support from staff members. I always appreciated help, whatever the form, but I have been the reciptent of unprofessional behavior from fellow staff nurses and I think you just have to chalk it up to that. I would suggest you talk with your agency and let them know about the attitudes on staff on certain floor or units. It may come in handy one day when there is a more serious question or problem.
    When I was working at one facility, the head nurse was a real witch, especially if someone was floated into the unit(ICU) to help. After a particularily trying day, I went to the DON and spoke with her regarding some problems I had encountered. This DON was very attentative and when I finished, she admitted I was about the fifth nurse to complain of the exact same issues. It was not long before there was a change in head nurses and some staff. I understand now this is a wonderful unit to work. Sometimes, we just have to vocalize our concerns. I hope things improve for you and you have great days at work this week. Have a blessed day. :angel2:
  8. by   rjflyn
    Being new to travel nursing I cant give alot of input. Most places are glad to have you as they would not need you if they had adequate staff. As an example last night where I am at there were we had 11 nurses on. Of those 5 of us were travel nurses, 2 were travel nurses who became staff, one who was the charge nurse. I'm in ER so the only real issue/difficulty I have is where stuff is, mostly things that dont get used every shift. That or where is this item stocked when the normal place is out. Alot of times those items even the staff isnt totally sure the exact spot to find it so we both end up looking. To me I have been in enough ER's over the last 17 years that ER is an ER is an ER except for the paperwork and where stuff is.

    Rj
  9. by   fergus51
    Obviously I wasn't talking about you since I don't even know you VanillaPalamino. Just making an observation with some of the travellers I work with. I wasn't clear what you meant by sink or swim. I have no problem telling travellers where the supplies are and someone certainly should have gone over that with you on orientation and any time you asked. I'm not anti-traveller at all. Maybe you missed where I wrote I help travellers when I can and would only resent them if they showed up unable to handle basic assignments. As long as a nurse can do her job, I'll happily work beside her! I have no desire to look after all the patients alone
  10. by   RRN
    Quote from fergus51
    And you have no vested interest in them. I really like our travellers and I don't resent them and help them when I can, but at the same time I don't feel bad for them if they complain about no PTO or being made to float. They chose their job and I chose mine. The sink or swim attitude... I don't know exactly what you mean, but I do expect travellers to be able to swim. We can't invest time handholding, that's why they get the perks they do (because the hospital is supposed to be getting an experienced nurse who can swim). I would resent travellers if they showed up on the unit and didn't know what they were doing with basic assignments.

    That's what I meant. The traveler has no vested interest in staying on as staff. I believe some staff envy us and wish they could join us.. Many don't have the incentive to do what we do.. You know the grass is greener on the other side of the fence.

    I don't float.. Never have.. But then again I don't travel to hospitals often and when I do I have no floating in my contract...

    I've seen experienced nurses who can't cut it... be they staff or travelers.
  11. by   RRN
    Quote from fergus51
    Obviously I wasn't talking about you since I don't even know you VanillaPalamino. Just making an observation with some of the travellers I work with. I wasn't clear what you meant by sink or swim. I have no problem telling travellers where the supplies are and someone certainly should have gone over that with you on orientation and any time you asked. I'm not anti-traveller at all. Maybe you missed where I wrote I help travellers when I can and would only resent them if they showed up unable to handle basic assignments. As long as a nurse can do her job, I'll happily work beside her! I have no desire to look after all the patients alone
    Many hospitals give NO orientation.. When I was in NC I was given the med room keys and shown where the med room was with 20 patient's as told
    "Good luck"....

    I was the only licensed person in the unit...


    BTW I make enough OT to cover my short weeks if I am sick.. And I get a week's vacation PAID every year now...
    Last edit by RRN on Mar 11, '05
  12. by   fergus51
    Couldn't you include orientation time in your contract? We give travellers 3 shifts of orientation. Our hospital does float travellers first, since its in our contract but that's about the only real downside they have at our hospital that I can see. There were some complaining that regular staff doing OT were staying on the unit while they were floated, but it's just the way it is. Like I said, they chose to be travellers and I chose to be staff. There are pros and cons to each decision.
  13. by   RRN
    Quote from fergus51
    Couldn't you include orientation time in your contract? We give travellers 3 shifts of orientation. Our hospital does float travellers first, since its in our contract but that's about the only real downside they have at our hospital that I can see. There were some complaining that regular staff doing OT were staying on the unit while they were floated, but it's just the way it is. Like I said, they chose to be travellers and I chose to be staff. There are pros and cons to each decision.

    Why would I include orientation time in my contract? I know how to swim. .Usually I'm training staff....
  14. by   RRN
    Quote from fergus51
    Couldn't you include orientation time in your contract? We give travellers 3 shifts of orientation. Our hospital does float travellers first, since its in our contract but that's about the only real downside they have at our hospital that I can see. There were some complaining that regular staff doing OT were staying on the unit while they were floated, but it's just the way it is. Like I said, they chose to be travellers and I chose to be staff. There are pros and cons to each decision.
    Opps double post...Sorry
    Last edit by RRN on Mar 11, '05

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