UMD’s CRNA School w. minimum critical care req.?

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    Has anyone been accepted to University MD's CRNA program with the minimum critical care requirement?

    Or to any of the surrounding CRNA programs with 1 year cc?
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  3. 18 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I am also interested about this. I am also looking into UMD's CRNA program.

    I do know that they prefer either SICU or cardiothoracic ICU experience. Any other information would be greatly appreciated.
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    I don't know about the acceptance rate at UMD, but I can tell you that you cannot trade anything for EXPERIENCE! I am in my second year of CRNA school; I worked in critical care for 10 years prior to applying to CRNA school. I have seen students in my class and heard of students in previous years with "minimum critical care" experience struggle when it came to the clinical portion of the program. I am not saying that you need 10 years. But truly, that first year in critical care is an orientation period... you don't know "jack" about much of anything... you are just beginning to get organized as an RN and start putting the pieces together at the end of that year.

    As you know, being a CRNA is a HUGE responsiblity, having good assessment skills and gut instinct that comes with experience is priceless.

    I also find that most CRNA's during your clinical rotation don't have as much "respect" for those who did the "minimum" just to get accepted into CRNA school. Most CRNA's I have worked with feel the "minimum" should be 5 years experience.

    Experience truly is the best teacher. Good luck in your journey!
  6. 0
    Quote from Somei
    I don't know about the acceptance rate at UMD, but I can tell you that you cannot trade anything for EXPERIENCE! I am in my second year of CRNA school; I worked in critical care for 10 years prior to applying to CRNA school. I have seen students in my class and heard of students in previous years with "minimum critical care" experience struggle when it came to the clinical portion of the program. I am not saying that you need 10 years. But truly, that first year in critical care is an orientation period... you don't know "jack" about much of anything... you are just beginning to get organized as an RN and start putting the pieces together at the end of that year.

    As you know, being a CRNA is a HUGE responsiblity, having good assessment skills and gut instinct that comes with experience is priceless.

    I also find that most CRNA's during your clinical rotation don't have as much "respect" for those who did the "minimum" just to get accepted into CRNA school. Most CRNA's I have worked with feel the "minimum" should be 5 years experience.

    Experience truly is the best teacher. Good luck in your journey!
    I agree with Somei,

    I have been a nurse for 10 years with expereince ranging from Med-surg to critical care, and still find many things difficult in clincals. My class expereince ranges from 2 yr- 25 yrs. ( the average is about 4-7 yrs).
    I agree, the 1st yr in ICU...what have you learned? Your just getting your feet wet, learning time management skills, understanding the vent, learning pressors, ect... After one yr ( total nursing), i dont understand how one feels strong enough to start anesthesia school.

    I too have seen so many students struggle clinically with the basics ( medications, concepts that an experienced nurse should be familiar with, and simply inserting IVs).
    I think its does them a disservice rushing into school after one yr..Im not saying it cant be done successfully...but whats the rush. Learn a little more on the units, take sick patients, pick the brains of the seasoned nurses.
    One of my friends in my class worked PEDS ICU for 1 yr ( total time as a nurse -4 yrs)...she is struggling so much in clinicals, she doesnt know alot of meds used for adults, the school sent her to IV thearpy workshop because she was getting substandard evaluations on IV insertions,).

    Again, many people have successfully completed school and did well. Yes, the school teaches you everything you need to know....but truly...a little longer than a yr will only HELP you and your patients!
    my two cents:
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    As someone wise said..."anesthesia is deadly"....anyone who is seeking a "fast-track" approach to getting in by skipping valuable experience frightens me. I had 16 years experience when I was accepted & was still learning new things every day. I remember when I had about 1 year under my belt & tought I knew it all.....now I look back & realize that I didn't have a clue.....
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    I want to hopefully apply to either Georgetown or University of Maryland's CRNA program within the next 5-6 years. I graduate from JMU's nursing program in May '10 and hope to move to the DC/Maryland area shortly after graduation. I will be applying to Georgetown, GW Hospital, WHC, and John Hopkins which are all great hospitals where I hope to get greta experience. I plan to work for 3-5 years in the ICU (hopefully get into a critical care residency as a new grad) and I want to know is this enough experience so that any program wont completely swallow me whole. I know I won't learn everything there is to know but I wanted a few opinions on the amount of time I plan to work. Honest advice appreciated and welcomed!
    scarcity21 likes this.
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    This is definately an interesting thread to CRNA wannabe's like myself. I just started in a CVICU as a new grad and I definately realize that theres a ridiculous amount of learning I need to do. But on the other hand, I'm studying outside of work to help ease the transition and out of personal interest and I'm really making learning my #1 priority. I can agree that after my one year mark I probably wouldnt feel ready to be a strong SRNA. But I have to ask, what exactly are the skills and areas of knowledge that you feel take 5 years to acquire? I'm currently planning on having 3 years experience by the time I would possibly start school and if I continue to learn at the pace a I am learning now I think I would be as ready as I could ever be. What are the areas of expertise that take 5 + years to learn, especially if you are going the extra mile to learn as much as you can throughout the first couple years?
  10. 0
    Quote from aCRNAhopeful
    This is definately an interesting thread to CRNA wannabe's like myself. I just started in a CVICU as a new grad and I definately realize that theres a ridiculous amount of learning I need to do. But on the other hand, I'm studying outside of work to help ease the transition and out of personal interest and I'm really making learning my #1 priority. I can agree that after my one year mark I probably wouldnt feel ready to be a strong SRNA. But I have to ask, what exactly are the skills and areas of knowledge that you feel take 5 years to acquire? I'm currently planning on having 3 years experience by the time I would possibly start school and if I continue to learn at the pace a I am learning now I think I would be as ready as I could ever be. What are the areas of expertise that take 5 + years to learn, especially if you are going the extra mile to learn as much as you can throughout the first couple years?
    Out of curiosity, where are you working? I know that it is extremely hard to land a job in the ICU as a new grad.
  11. 1
    It's not as hard as you might think, I interviewed with two hospitals and both of which had a policy allowing new grads into critical care. One of the hospitals was a level one trauma center and routinely hires new grads. Both of the hosptals were in Central IL
    scarcity21 likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from aCRNAhopeful
    It's not as hard as you might think, I interviewed with two hospitals and both of which had a policy allowing new grads into critical care. One of the hospitals was a level one trauma center and routinely hires new grads. Both of the hosptals were in Central IL
    Thank you for the words of encouragement. I guess it varies from hospital to hospital.

    I have also heard that if you do your senior clinical rotation in an ICU, then it may be easier to get a job in that ICU when you graduate.


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