CRNA Vs Anesthesiologist

  1. Hi, when i finally immigrate i want to become a CRNA, what is the actual difference between these two professions. Clearly, i know that the Anesthesiologist is a qualified MD. Has anybody ever gone onto the MD training after their Msc. I suppose somethings niggling me because i can be a sucker for pride. I dont want to be doing entirely the same job as an MD, but just getting less pay.. hope you dont find that a silly comment to make just something ive been thinking about.. Appreciate all your replies..xx
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   Alpha13
    But think about it the other way.. would you want to do the same thing as a CRNA, but with 3-4 years more training and a much more rigorous undergrad?

    Actually I don't want to imply that the professions are the same in all respects because this is something I'm also looking into myself.
  4. by   dfk
    well, also think about it this way.. from what my conversations and reading has given me, md's usually are there to do the induction and emergence.. whether this changes or averts from the norm, whether skill or trust, i'm not sure, since i am just starting out as an srna.. but, aside from that, their (-ologists) training still is overall more intensive than a crna.. don't get me wrong, i love the crna profession, but one has to admit, a broader education could and usually does prevail, given who is the "boss" in the end... and too, we cannot write scripts or the like, unless dual roled, such as an NP and CRNA, which is gaining popularity and will definitely make the mark in the near future... basically, what i am saying is that although we, as srna's, have a pretty solid and rigorous didactic and clinical training, i can't wholly agree that it's equivalent, per se, as a med school slash anesthesia resident education/training.. if that's what you want, then by all means, do it.. there are some that would rather give orders than receive... not that it's bad in either direction..
    in my opinion and experiences, and from what i have seen in my time, i do NOT want to be a med student and the like... at this point anyway.. it could change, but am making NO decisions at this point.. LET ME MAKE IT THRU SRNA AND THEN ASK ME !!!!!!!!!!!!
    sorry for straying if i did.. but, oh well... !
  5. by   heartICU
    Quote from dfk
    ...we cannot write scripts or the like, unless dual roled, such as an NP and CRNA, which is gaining popularity and will definitely make the mark in the near future...
    Depends on the state. In some states, CRNAs have prescriptive authority.
  6. by   dfk
    Quote from heartICU
    Depends on the state. In some states, CRNAs have prescriptive authority.
    interesting you say this, heart, because i cannot find any specific info that allows crna's to write scripts as say an NP can (within their scope of practice as well). i know that, as for orders, they can be written by a crna, mostly practice related as well, and that there are also protocols that allow for "prescribing".
    working, say a pain clinic, usually follows protocols just the same, unless again, dually roled, as i see it.
    please let me know which states allow independent prescribing for crna's.
    thanks ~
  7. by   heartICU
    Sorry...duplicate post. See below.
    Last edit by heartICU on Aug 31, '06
  8. by   heartICU
    Not sure what you mean here. Are you asking if CRNAs can write a prescription to be filled a a pharmacy, such as a WalGreen's? Or are you asking if a CRNA can order various medications/treatments/etc.

    Off the top of my head, I know Oklahoma CRNAs have prescriptive authority. I believe Arizona does too, and New Mexico. It's late...I will look into it further tomorrow.
  9. by   jonRNMD
    Quote from NurseMonique21
    I suppose somethings niggling me because i can be a sucker for pride. I dont want to be doing entirely the same job as an MD, but just getting less pay.. hope you dont find that a silly comment to make just something ive been thinking about.. Appreciate all your replies..xx
    think about it this way: to be a CRNA would require 6 years post secondary education....while an Anesthesiologist would require 12 years post secondary education.....

    if PRIDE is your thing, then i guess its better for you to take up an additional 6 years of education.....just my 2 cents
  10. by   Nurse2BMonique21
    ok i get your point, 12 years is a long time!...i do want to enjoy some of my career!..im only 20...and i will probably think differently by then..
  11. by   dfk
    Quote from jonRNMD
    think about it this way: to be a CRNA would require 6 years post secondary education....while an Anesthesiologist would require 12 years post secondary education.....

    if PRIDE is your thing, then i guess its better for you to take up an additional 6 years of education.....just my 2 cents
    PRIDE?? so i guess i won't get any PRIDE as a crna.. and as for the education, yea, it APPEARS longer, but take into consideration those of us that might have a master's degree already, prior to getting rn and crna. now, that would equate to, oh, say 6-7 yrs of post sec. educ, plus 6 yrs nursing/crna post sec. educ.
    to me, looks like that adds up to just about the same.
    md's have to have a four yr before med school. could be english, engineering, humanities, etc... so, what's the difference?
    granted med school is different than crna, and yea, md's get more clinical hours, but crna is specialized for those two yrs. of educ. and clinical.
    so, i can assure you, i will take MUCH PRIDE when i finish.
    thanks for dropping by ~
  12. by   staygold
    Have you thought about staying in the UK for your schooling?I spent a massive part of my life in Manc and Westham and considered going back to university there.I just can't find any info UK APRN degrees in the States. Any insight would be appreciated.Thanks in advance.
  13. by   Brian_SRNA
    Pride????? Hmmmmm? I was never so proud as when I got accepted to CRNA school. Induction/Emergence, that depends on where you work and your skill level. In my facility(where I have accepted a position) the crna's do the induction/emegences without the MDA right by the side. This is wonderful profession and I am so happy to be a part of it. BUT, it is not for everyone, you need to wheigh everything in your life to see if it is right. Best of luck

    Brian
  14. by   Outdoor1
    Quote from Brian_SRNA
    Pride????? Hmmmmm? I was never so proud as when I got accepted to CRNA school. Induction/Emergence, that depends on where you work and your skill level. In my facility(where I have accepted a position) the crna's do the induction/emegences without the MDA right by the side. This is wonderful profession and I am so happy to be a part of it. BUT, it is not for everyone, you need to wheigh everything in your life to see if it is right. Best of luck

    Brian
    I am with you there. I felt enormous pride upon geting accepted to school and i have just started clinical and feel the same way. The anesthesiologists where i am are sometimes present for induction if they are around and not so much for emergence. There is a great deal of respect for the CRNA's and good team work. Personally I have thought about "do i want to be an MD?". What i have come up with after being in school and now entering clinical the answer is no. I like being with one patient at a time and being with them the whole time. It has been very rewarding. I almost feel sorry for the MD's if they would actually want to do cases because they really don't get the chance. They do get paid nicely though and are a great resource to have.

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