What Must I do???

  1. 0
    So here is my current situation:
    I am a 3rd year undergrad student majoring in Biomolecular Science, and I would like to attend an accelerated BSN/MSN program after I graduate. Currently I have a 2.57gpa and although I should graduate May 2015, I'd rather graduate December 2015 or May 2016 in order to boost my gpa, retake classes I need or to take the classes I haven't taken yet. (Also, I have a C or 2 in prerequisite classes)
    I anticipate a 3.3gpa by the time I graduate, but what schools have you gotten into with a decent gpa?

    My personal statement is very impressive, I volunteer with the American Red Cross, and I intend on having 2 professional references. What would you say is the likelihood of getting into a BSN/MSN program? And where are these colleges located?

    My specialty I've decided is Women's Health, my ultimate goal is to become a Labor and Delivery Nurse Practitioner.

    What do you advise I do from here on out to have the best chance of getting into a program...such as when to take GRE's, etc...

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  2. 0
    So here is my current situation:
    I am a 3rd year undergrad student majoring in Biomolecular Science, and I would like to attend an accelerated BSN/MSN program after I graduate. Currently I have a 2.57gpa and although I should graduate May 2015, I'd rather graduate December 2015 or May 2016 in order to boost my gpa, retake classes I need or to take the classes I haven't taken yet. (Also, I have a C or 2 in prerequisite classes)
    I anticipate a 3.3gpa by the time I graduate, but what schools have you gotten into with a decent gpa?

    My personal statement is very impressive, I volunteer with the American Red Cross, and I intend on having 2 professional references. What would you say is the likelihood of getting into a BSN/MSN program? And where are these colleges located?

    My specialty I've decided is Women's Health, my ultimate goal is to become a Labor and Delivery Nurse Practitioner.

    What do you advise I do from here on out to have the best chance of getting into a program...such as when to take GRE's, etc...
  3. 0
    Your GPA will definitely need to come up. I would make sure your science GPA and over all GPA is at least a 3.0 when all is said and done. I would probably not take the GRE until you were a few months prior to actually applying to the graduate program. Make sure you read the programs policies, because some will not allow C's at all, while some may allow 1-2 before dismissing you from the program. You would have to look online in your state or ask around for specific programs. Do you feel you are too far into your degree right now to go ahead and switch to a BSN then do MSN later after obtaining your RN license?
  4. 0
    That GPA is very, very low if you plan on entering a "MEPN"-like program as those programs are becoming more and more competitive. I think most people who get accepted into those programs have 3.7+ GPA as well as more experience than just American Red Cross. Also, you anticipate your GPA to be 3.3? Interesting.

    These threads are pretty funny. Come on. Do your research.
  5. 0
    I agree with Brit. Your GPA needs to come up. Most reputable BSN-MSN programs are very competitive and are looking for GPAs well over 3.0. Also, since you want to work in labor and delivery, you should be looking at a Certified Nurse Midwife program, not a women's health NP program. There aren't that many of those programs, so they may be even more competitive than Women's Health programs. One school to look at is Frontier. They are a well established CNM program. It might be helpful to get in touch with them and see what they're looking for in their applicants.

    Good luck!
  6. 0
    threads merged as per the TOS and moved for best response
  7. 0
    OP:

    1. Why were you studying Biomolecular science if your goal was to become an NP? I suspect you were a pre-med, realize you can't get into medical school with that low of a GPA, so you are doing NP as a "backup." If that is the case, please be aware that the odds are stacked against you. Admissions committees at nursing schools aren't going to be pleased that you see their career as backup, and you will need to write a really good personal statement that explains why nursing is your passion. You need to research the profession and prove you aren't just falling back on it.

    2. Speaking of researching the profession, please note that there is no such thing as a "Labor and Delivery Nurse Practitioner". I actually believe if your goal is labor and delivery, a Nurse Midwife is more relevant. A women's health NP is more trained to the role of an office based gynecologist, acting as a female specific primary health care provider.

    3. Direct entry MSN programs are the most competitive of all nursing programs, thanks to the numerous "Best job" articles showing the smiling nurse practitioner with dollar signs around her head. Most programs get 500-800 applications for sometimes as few as 50 seats. a 2.57 GPA will not get you into ANY program. If you can get it up to above a 3.0, you have a shot, but even then it will be tough. As others have stated, most people accepted to direct entry programs have a 3.7+ GPA. You are taking 7 years worth of courses (typically 4 year BSN and 2-3 master's degree) in approximately 3 years. You have to prove you can handle that.

    I suggest you really do some more research before you commit to this. One thing I always ask the hopeful direct-entry MSN students is this: Do you want to be an RN first? I know so many pre-meds who didn't quite get the grades they needed for medical school tried to do an MSN as a "backup." Many couldn't even complete the BSN portion because they had no idea what being a nurse entailed. They thought it would be as simple as passing out a few pills for a bit then moving right onto the NP program, but it's just not that easy. Nursing school clinicals involve a lot of hands on patient care that is not for the squeamish - debriding wounds, changing linens covered in blood and excrement, inserting enemas, giving bed baths, cleaning up code browns, etc etc. On top of that there is the stress of knowing you are the first line of defense if your patient crashes. If you can handle that, get your GPA up to at least a 3.2 or higher, and really learn about the career, then go for it. If you don't think you can handle the RN part, go for PA school. It's honestly no more competitive than direct entry MSN programs are these days.
  8. 0
    Frontier does offer both CNM and WHNP as well as a FNP program, but it does sound like CNM is the program that would do what you want. Frontier does require that you are a RN first, so for their programs, you would be completing your BS degree, then doing either a BSN or ADN program as a RN, then doing the Frontier CNM program (which would get you your DNP/CNM degree), so not exactly what you were thinking you wanted, but might be an option. I don't know if you would need the BSN, I think (not positive) that frontier would be able to take you with your non-nursing BS degree assuming you had certain pre-reqs in your undergrad, might want to check that on their website.

    Going that route would likely give you plenty of time to bring your GPA up, which I think we all agree would be a big help to your application. I would suggest that you research a few programs that would get you your CNM degree, what their admission requirements are (which should be on their websites) and how long it would take you to meet them. From past experience, I would expect that although there will be minor differences, most of the requirements will be the same, and you will have a good idea what you need to do to become a viable candidate to several of the programs.

    Where are you located? Are you willing to move? You will need to be local to the program while you are getting your RN, that may or may not be the case for the NP/CNM portion of your program depending on the school you choose. So, one of the first determinants will be based on what location you are willing to reside at for the RN portion of the program and if there are any BSN/MSN programs in that area. Also, if you are willing to move, will you be an out of state student, how will that affect your tuition and other costs. Just some things to think about.
  9. 0
    I have started looking at schools, Northeastern U is my first choice. I live in Connecticut but have absolutely no preference on location. I've also looked into Boston College, MGH, and U of Rochester. Can anyone tell me their experience with these schools? Whether it's the acceptance process or quality of program? Thank you! I think my biggest problem is that I currently attend a school that does not provide much academic guidance, but before transferring here I had a 3.4gpa from Monroe College at New Rochelle, and I plan on taking a year off to take prerequisites at a community college which will also boost my gpa.


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