Becoming an NP with little to no nursing experience?? - page 40

Hello to all!!! I have worked as a parmamedic for 20 years, have a B.A. in Economics, and I wanted to advance my career in healthcare. I was originally looking to pursue the PA route, but for... Read More

  1. by   traumaRUs
    And...as Medicare/Medicaid cuts reimbursement and "bundles" care, mid-level salaries will cont to decline and/or stagnate. In my area, (central IL) there are no jobs for new grad RNs and no mid-level positions either.
  2. by   Carolbknits
    Hi,
    What do you consider midlevel? I'm in a refresher course to go back to work but am waiting for the last clinical part. I am an experienced RN but out of the field 3 years and off the floors 11 years. Thanks
    love hugs and prayers
    Carol
  3. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from Carolbknits
    Hi,
    What do you consider midlevel? I'm in a refresher course to go back to work but am waiting for the last clinical part. I am an experienced RN but out of the field 3 years and off the floors 11 years. Thanks
    love hugs and prayers
    Carol
    A midlevel is either a PA, NP or CNS. I suppose a CRNA is also a midlevel.
  4. by   traumaRUs
    Yes, I apologize - I was referring to PA, NP, CNS, CNM, CRNA.
  5. by   FNPdude74
    I've heard many different thoughts and opinions about this issue. I myself, am a new Spring 2009 BSN graduate from a University. I received my RN license around July 17 (around that date) in the mail after taking the NLCEX on July 3rd and passing on first try at 75 questions (I know this doesn't mean anything). I received a admission notice around May for the Master's FNP program starting this Fall 2009.

    I made a post earlier this year about how some of the nurses at a large medical center told me, while I was in the icu staying with my aunty who was admitted, that I shouldn't have gone to FNP school so soon. They insisted that I get experience first of at least 2 years as a bedside RN. They also said there are no jobs for NP's in Hawaii and they make less than staff RN's. However, I found out from actual NP's, that as they gain experience as a NP like 3-5years+, they would make more than a staff RN working 40 hours a week. Also that staff RN's have the potential to make more than an NP because of overtime hours, otherwise NP's make more working the regular 40 hours a week. My motivation was NOT solely because of money, it may be part of it, but I found out there are long term benefits of being an NP since I really WANTED to practice as a NP.

    The scope of practice is vastly different compared to a staff RN. This is what motivated me the most, the type and scope of practice of FNP's and how I can possibly expand the scope of practice by completing more training such as residencies or fellowships which I found out they do have some because I searched for them on the internet.

    So there. I am still willing to get the bedside experience as a staff RN but I will ultimately end up practicing as a FNP possibly in acute care after I obtain the training such as in ER. I know some FNP's here in Hawaii and I know of some in california who work in the ER and practice almost like a physician. Diagnose and treat medical conditions. I was going to join the Air Force active duty and get into the Nurse Transition Program (NTP), work as a staff RN for 1-2 years, then they'll train and transition me into a FNP since I'll already have the degree and license as a FNP by then. Though I will get this in writing of course and I've been told by different healthcare professionals in the military that they're also desperate for NP's. I'll stay in probably for about 6 years active duty and go into air force reserves and stay back at home in Hawaii. So i guess going into FNP school with no nursing experience isn't bad at all with the plan I have for myself.
  6. by   JDCitizen
    Quote from hollattaplaya
    i've heard many different thoughts and opinions about this issue.
    there are many :-)

    i myself, am a new spring 2009 bsn graduate from a university. i received my rn license around july 17 (around that date) in the mail after taking the nlcex on july 3rd and passing on first try at 75 questions (i know this doesn't mean anything). i received a admission notice around may for the master's fnp program starting this fall 2009.
    oh i still remember my boards :-) congratulations!

    i made a post earlier this year about how some of the nurses at a large medical center told me, while i was in the icu staying with my aunty who was admitted, that i shouldn't have gone to fnp school so soon. they insisted that i get experience first of at least 2 years as a bedside rn. they also said there are no jobs for np's in hawaii and they make less than staff rn's. however, i found out from actual np's, that as they gain experience as a np like 3-5years+, they would make more than a staff rn working 40 hours a week. also that staff rn's have the potential to make more than an np because of overtime hours, otherwise np's make more working the regular 40 hours a week. my motivation was not solely because of money, it may be part of it, but i found out there are long term benefits of being an np since i really wanted to practice as a np.


    the scope of practice is vastly different compared to a staff rn. this is what motivated me the most, the type and scope of practice of fnp's and how i can possibly expand the scope of practice by completing more training such as residencies or fellowships which i found out they do have some because i searched for them on the internet.

    so there. i am still willing to get the bedside experience as a staff rn but i will ultimately end up practicing as a fnp possibly in acute care after i obtain the training such as in er. i know some fnp's here in hawaii and i know of some in california who work in the er and practice almost like a physician. diagnose and treat medical conditions. i was going to join the air force active duty and get into the nurse transition program (ntp), work as a staff rn for 1-2 years, then they'll train and transition me into a fnp since i'll already have the degree and license as a fnp by then. though i will get this in writing of course and i've been told by different healthcare professionals in the military that they're also desperate for np's. i'll stay in probably for about 6 years active duty and go into air force reserves and stay back at home in hawaii. so i guess going into fnp school with no nursing experience isn't bad at all with the plan i have for myself.
    you will find on this site the arguments about clinical hours while in np school. true nursing as an rn is different with a different scope of practice. depending on the unit(s) you decide to work on the knowledge gained is invaluable (my thoughts) from patient care, to actual interaction with the patients and their families to interaction with professionals across the spectrum.

    also a lot can/will depend on the practice you go into and the amount of teaching/instructing your new employer(s) are willing to do. research on this site will show you there is a multitude of different experiences and viewpoints on this.

    as for the air force decision i might suggest visiting the government and military nursing site here at allnurses and visiting airforceots.com…

    three final thoughts:
    - as you gain experience as a np those will be real patients in real time that you will be working with…
    - your plans for the air force is great but practicing as a rn (new degree to you now) after becoming an np (takes about two years depending on program)… lot of time for loss of taught skills even considering the transition program for nurses.
    - may i suggest that you read the recertification requirements for aanp and acnp? the clock starts ticking on recertification requirements past boards.
    Last edit by JDCitizen on Aug 17, '09
  7. by   FNPdude74
    Quote from JDCitizen
    Three final thoughts:
    - As you gain experience as a NP those will be real patients in real time that you will be working with…
    - Your plans for the Air Force is great but practicing as a RN (new degree to you now) after becoming an NP (takes about two years depending on program)… Lot of time for loss of taught skills even considering the transition program for nurses.
    - May I suggest that you read the recertification requirements for AANP and ACNP? The clock starts ticking on recertification requirements past boards.
    JDCitizen,
    Thanks for your input. Yes there are pros and cons to this situation. In response to your final thoughts, during the two years while in FNP school, I will be working as a graduate assistant at my School of Nursing with my professors in the Skills Learning Lab and the Simulation Man Lab. I will also be helping the faculty/clinical instructors in working with their students on their nursing skills by assisting and going over with them, their skills checklist and competency evaluation at their last semester. So this may be a good thing for me while I'm not practicing full-time as a Bedside RN. I think this will allow continuous exposure to what we had been taught in school. Any thoughts?
    Last edit by FNPdude74 on Aug 18, '09 : Reason: Wanted to shorten the post.
  8. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from hollattaplaya
    JDCitizen,
    Thanks for your input. Yes there are pros and cons to this situation. In response to your final thoughts, during the two years while in FNP school, I will be working as a graduate assistant at my School of Nursing with my professors in the Skills Learning Lab and the Simulation Man Lab. I will also be helping the faculty/clinical instructors in working with their students on their nursing skills by assisting and going over with them, their skills checklist and competency evaluation at their last semester. So this may be a good thing for me while I'm not practicing full-time as a Bedside RN. I think this will allow continuous exposure to what we had been taught in school. Any thoughts?
    Let me get this straight, you are a brand new RN grad with no experience in nursing and you're going to teach nursing skills to students? I'm totally lost on that one.
  9. by   FNPdude74
    Quote from ANPFNPGNP
    Let me get this straight, you are a brand new RN grad with no experience in nursing and you're going to teach nursing skills to students? I'm totally lost on that one.

    Hey sorry, what I meant to say was, I'm going to use a checklist provided by the faculty, to see if they're following the checklist step by step. Then they'll perform their skills according to the checklist in front of an instructor to be evaluated. I'm not going to actually "teach" them myself on nursing skills. If they have questions, they'll ask the instructors or other nursing faculty who had so many years of experience, in the learning lab. I will be bringing supplies into the room from the supply room, making sure people aren't fooling around, make sure the undergrads aren't missing a step on their checklist before they're evaluated, and help the faculty set up scenarios (putting mannequins on the beds with a leg wound, etc). I will NOT be doing ANY teaching because of liabilities from what I've been told. I just started orientation on this grad assistantship so i'm not very clear on what I would be able to do with the students in the skills learning lab. Probably limited though. However, I believe it may be good for me to be around them to refresh my memory on things.

    In the simulation lab, I will only be running the electronic mannequins and the scenarios according to what the faculty wanted. In the simulation lab, basically I'll: restock, move around props, create a environment according to the scenario, work with the Sim man Program on the computer to run it, and make voices through the microphone acting like a patient. Very technical stuff, no teaching at all.
  10. by   JDCitizen
    I still believe the skills you gained will rust and I doubt your time would apply towards recertification as an NP...

    I highly recommend you look at the AANP and the ANCC recertification requirements..
  11. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from JDCitizen
    I still believe the skills you gained will rust and I doubt your time would apply towards recertification as an NP...

    I highly recommend you look at the AANP and the ANCC recertification requirements..
    You're right, RN experience doesn't count towards NP recertification hours. A NP must work a certain amount of hours IN THEIR SPECIALTY to recertify. I know someone who was audited recently when she tried to recertify - she had to "prove" her practice hours.
  12. by   FNPdude74
    I got this off of the AANP website:

    http://www.aanp.org/Certification/Re...ifications.htm

    Does this mean that I need minimum 1,000 hours of clinical practice and 75 hours of CME during the 5 year period? In that case, since I'll just be working as a RN for about two years in the Air Force, am I considered "safe" in terms of re-certification so I won't have to retake the certification exam?
  13. by   JDCitizen
    It will be 2 years (+): You have to go through a recruiter, submit your package, have that package accepted, get a COT date and get into the Air Force.... Once in will the Air Force let you transition as quick as you think you must remember needs of the service. There is a lot of ifs....

    Technically safe per the minimum requirements. How do you believe your clinical skills will be to go from practicing as an RN one day to practicing as an NP the next? This all two (+) years after going to NP school. Ask yourself would you want to be that patient?

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