Do rural hospitals orientate their nurses?

  1. 0
    Greetings rural nurses!

    I feel like this is a dumb question but do rural hospitals have an orientation program for their new nurses? Or is it common for rural areas to just have their nursing start on the floor without any orientation to the floor?

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  2. 6 Comments...

  3. 0
    Hi! When I started a new job at a rural hospital after leaving a larger one I took an ER position on nights. It was a very small one - (both shifts were staffed the same) An LPN on the floor, an RN in the ER, and an RN as charge nurse. We had an ICU that was actually 1 large room with curtains to hold 3 pts. In the few years I was there I remember us actually having an ICU pt twice, and we were really just waiting to get the transferred to a larger facility.

    Anyway, I had a nice orientation period - I am not really sure how long it was because this was quite some time ago - and the same happened when new hires started on the floor too.

    I really enjoyed my time working at that rural hospital and learned SO much! Because there wasn't a lot of ancillary staff, we just all pulled together and helped out when needed.

    Anne, RNC
  4. 0
    Quote from sissiesmama
    Hi! When I started a new job at a rural hospital after leaving a larger one I took an ER position on nights. It was a very small one - (both shifts were staffed the same) An LPN on the floor, an RN in the ER, and an RN as charge nurse. We had an ICU that was actually 1 large room with curtains to hold 3 pts. In the few years I was there I remember us actually having an ICU pt twice, and we were really just waiting to get the transferred to a larger facility.

    Anyway, I had a nice orientation period - I am not really sure how long it was because this was quite some time ago - and the same happened when new hires started on the floor too.

    I really enjoyed my time working at that rural hospital and learned SO much! Because there wasn't a lot of ancillary staff, we just all pulled together and helped out when needed.

    Anne, RNC
    Thanks for your response. I'm considering an ED job at a rural hospital which will not have an orientation program and I'm trying to decided if I should take it or not. I didn't know if it was a common trend for rural hospitals not putting their nurses through orientation or if it was just my prospective hospital in general.
  5. 0
    Lost, I think all healthcare facilities have great expectations of a thourough orientation. In the rural setting tho a two week or six week time frame or whatever is set for orientation. Problem is some times we are empty and the orientee might not see floor patients on their selected shifts. Might see an ER or two. The best way to orient a new hire would be to have dummy patients set up in the computer so as to practice admit, discharge, order entry, etc. The new hire is probably very experienced in med-surg. New hires can not be afraid of the ER. Unfortuanately many times the orientee is just going to work prn. Then you figure out they only worked ten shifts so to take the family on that cruise they told you about or they quit just before Christmas then you have a staffing issue but the prn had a nice Christmas. Rural hospitals get tired of this happening repeatedly. Hope this helps? Russell
  6. 0
    I am transitioning from school nursing back to hospital med surg nusing at a rural haspital and they did have an orientation of 3 days! Not much but then I did have 2.5 years experience in peds 4 years ago. We've hired several new grad who also only have 3-5 days orientation before taking their own Pts. There is a steep learning cure. One of the new grads after only being on her own for 2 weeks had a Pt who coded and died. She was a bit shook up. I would assume each facility has their own policy. Ask about it before taking anything and be willing to be uncomfortable. After only a couple of weeks on I found myself as the only nurse on the floor for a couple of shifts. That's a bit nerve racking when you're still trying to figure out/remember what you're doing!
  7. 0
    I think it varies, but the rural hospital I'm working at has a very limited orientation. I got a much better one in a big city hospital. The one thing I've found that I really like about working in rural vs. big city is you get much more diversified in your nursing care. I was hired in L&D due to 8 years experience elsewhere, but I float to ER and med-surg. I am learning quite a bit and loving it!


    One of our travelers has only been aw nurse for one year and she was trained at a small rural hospital. She has amazing skills for a new grad. I think you will find you learn a lot as you go along.

    good luck!
  8. 0
    Rural hospitals do have orientation for their nurses. It is just different from the bigger hospitals. Rural nurses will not let you go until they feel you are ready. Rural nurses like to know about you. So be prepared to give you life story a few times.


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