RN vs. BSN - page 2

I am wondering what the differences in RN and BSN are. I am in the process of deciding to get my RN or go all out and get my BSN. Is there a big difference in pay for BSN, or do (small towns) just... Read More

  1. Visit  katie1285 profile page
    0
    One idea that wasn't mentioned, if you get your ADN and then start working, you can go to working part time and get some tuition reimbursement while you get your BSN. It seems like a lot of hospitals (at least in Maryland where I live) encourage you to do this. I guess you have to think about whether you know you want a role other than bedside nursing, I am told BSN focuses more sometimes on leadership.
  2. Visit  msnicci profile page
    0
    Quote from blady
    And what is wrong with that? career vs Job?????????????
    FYI, Its always a nurse with an ADN, who thinks/ excliams "there is not a difference" in pay. As it may be a personal choice but I say this.... If "you" as a parent expect the person teaching your child to have a 4 year degree minimum, then why would'nt you exspect the same from the person giving their medical care. We as nurses are the reason why society as well as nurses think there is not difference. The difference is the education, It not only includes more patho& pharm, it requires research, nursing theory, and much more. I suggest, you do a side by side curriculm comparison and decide for your self. I chose to get my BSN ,because I not only want to be a nurse, I want to be part of the changing nursing future.
    Ps. since when do nurses jugde themselves or our proffession by the paycheck alone. ( I learned that in Prof I N216 at a 4 year BSN program)
  3. Visit  Farmer Jane profile page
    11
    This lowly ADN nurse is very, very tempted to correct the hideous spelling and grammar in the post above. Really, if you're going to write a post about how your knowledge is superior and how you want to change the future of nursing, please consider how your present yourself when using the written word.
  4. Visit  kathleenrswan profile page
    0
    Hi, fellow nurses! This may be old news by now, But I'd like to chime in on this "What's the difference b/w an RN and a BSN?. The biggest difference, is one is a college degree (BSN) and the other (RN) is almost non-related. Here's what I mean: I went to college after being an LPN for 11 years, to "get my RN degree"--I kept telling myself. It wasn't until near the end of those 4 years that it dawned on me that graduating from college gets me a college degree, not a license to work. What the BSN program does do, is prepare the student to be qualified to sit for the board exam (NCLEX-RN). Now, mind you, one does not need to go get a BSN in order to sit for the boards; and student who successfully completes one of 3 RN options can do it. Perhaps the better question, is What is the difference b/w a 2-year RN (Associate Degree), a 3-year RN (hospital-associated school of nursing), and the 4-year RN (diploma). In a word: Theory. Thew longer you are in schooling, the more theory you are going to get. The requirements dictated to the various teaching methods which prepare the student for the NCLEX-RN, are the same across the board; the student has to prove demonstrated knowledge in XYZ. It is the exact same board exam for all 3 divisions of test-takers. It is the amount of Theory (and all that comes under that really big umbrella), that is what "they" are seeking when they hire that RN, BSN. For me, getting the college degree was a marketing move; I do not want to still be humping a cart when I'm 70. And if you want to teach--even at the LPN level, you're better prepared to get hired if you have that 4-year college degree. Just my 2-cents' worth.
  5. Visit  kathleenrswan profile page
    1
    Interesting usage of spelling...seems rather fitting for this nurse who so quickly knocks down another.
    DarkBluePhoenix likes this.
  6. Visit  cha1543 profile page
    0
    Simply put, having a Bachelor's degree in Nursing instead of only a Registered Nursing license equals more power for those who hold a 4-yr degree. It's no different than any other field you go into with regards to more education vs. less. Those who have already have their bachelor's in Nursing when they begin to apply for positions, will automatically have more doors open to them and more flexibility with where and what nursing specialty they want to persue. For example, if you have an BSN you can apply for jobs in nursing management or hold titles such as assistant director of nursing. Basically, the nurse who has a Bachelor's, has the freedom to work if they so choose, as an R.N., with a little more pay than the R.N. gets doing the same exact job, OR, you can choose to work as the R.N.'s supervisor making quite a bit more pay and having the superiority to boot. Also, another thing that may solidfy your decision, is the fact that medical field experts and hospital administrators across the country are stating that as it stands now, the R.N. associate degree program is in the beginning stages of being "phased-out" and more and more Nursing schools across the country have switched ther programs to only offering the 4 year nursing degree. This transformation of the nursing field will benefit all involved and the demand for higher standards is said to be partly due to expectations from the medical community, physicians, and public and patient desire as well as the nurses themselves.
  7. Visit  tferdaise profile page
    3
    As someone who went from lpn to BSN let me chime in here. For over 40 years its been said that the BSN is going to be the entry degree into Nursing. I beleive this should happen. Now, I'm not saying that BSN RNs are better then ADN nurses. But if one looks at other professions the switch to having a undergrad as entry level has started. Look at Engineering, 40 years ago, a engineer was someone who learned on the job, then it was to be a engineer you had to have a undergrad, now starting in 2012, a Masters is needed (everybody else without one piror to 2012 will be grandfathered in) to be a Engineer. So why can't this happen to Nursing? Fact, college degree (4 yrs degree) people make more money then people without one.

    Now here in Phoenix, area, I can tell you the job market has made a hugh change in the last 2 yrs. Nurses (even LPNS) could jump from job to job without a problem, today that is not so, many new grads are not finding jobs. I know that hospitals can pick and choose, and the ones with BSNs are being hired over ADN nurses.

    I start my MSN in Jan, and the door will open up even bigger for me once I'm done. There is a saying I heard, "The Masters degree is the old Bachalor's degree."
  8. Visit  msnicci profile page
    0
    Quote from farmer jane
    this lowly adn nurse is very, very tempted to correct the hideous spelling and grammar in the post above. really, if you're going to write a post about how your knowledge is superior and how you want to change the future of nursing, please consider how your present yourself when using the written word.
    i never said "our" knowledge was superior. i was explaining the education is quite different and should be expected. yes, my spelling was quite awful in my post although my point was clear. it is my "opinion" receiving a bsn is not only empowering for the individual, it brings more power to the profession of nursing. instead of the finger pointing and fighting about which degree is better, why not spend the time researching a solution to the problem of lack of colleagueship as well as professional autonomy. one major difference i have noticed both in practice and especially viewing posts on this message board is a level of professionalism.

    i chose a bsn program for the very reason you criticized me. i wanted a nursing education. my education has afforded many opportunities including licensure for the state board of nursing. i have tutored pathophysiology, pharmacology, nlcex review courses, as well has held leadership positions at both the national and state level. i have been involved in legislation, resolution writing, and evidenced based practice policy implementation. throughout the process i grew into a scholarly writer and future nursing leader. yes, i thought about attending a local community college to receive an adn which would have given me the same license as my peers. the choice to attend a 4 year program changed my life, practice and the way i view "our" profession. i have the greatest amount of respect for well seasoned adn's. i have learned from experienced nurses with many levels of education. however my peers who graduated with me from programs with less than 4 years of education have noted the significant difference in the education. i believe this should not be a debate of education versus experience it should be a dialogue of education and professional empowerment.
  9. Visit  stressednurse70 profile page
    0
    I took a long 'round about way to get to my BSN. I started out right out of high school getting my BA in biology. Then later I went back to school for my ASN. Worked as a RN for more than a decade before going back for my BSN. My plan is to use my BSN as a stepping stone to my MSN in education. I will be 41 when I graduate with my BSN while working full time. I also hope that the BSN will open more doors while earning my MSN. The ASN had worked for me over the years but some positions have been denied to me simply because of the lack of BSN, even with the BA already earned. I encourage students to go for their BSN if nothing else to increase their options in the workforce.
  10. Visit  tk0224 profile page
    0
    I'm glad Canada changed their entry to practice requirement to BScN in 2005. Nobody is able to argue over this anymore. We still have diploma RNs who have been grandfathered into the system and encouraged to go back, but it really cuts down on a lot of this "who is better than who" crap. We now simply have ONE avenue to take to become an RN, and ONE avenue to take to be an LPN (with the exception of Quebec).

    Also, I think in today's world - students entering the nursing profession should be degree prepared - it most definitely adds to the professionalism of the profession itself, I don't care what anyone says. With the patient acuity nowadays, RNs play a much larger role in the care of individuals than ever before, and the role continues to evolve. With this comes the need for more education!

    I totally understand many people who don't have the time nor money to invest in a BScN - but if you take a look at Canada, many programs are popping up now that take 2-3 years (same timeframe as an ADN in the USA) for a baccalaureate degree. I would not be surprised to see many more of these types of programs popping up over the country in the near future either.

    If nursing wants to truly move forward, and really gain the credit/respect it deserves - streamlining practice at the degree level is a perfect way to start that process. Many older nurses in Canada might disagree, but it's working well here I think, and there is a lot less disrespect for our fellow nurses as well

    Just my 2 cents. I am proud to be a BScN, RN
  11. Visit  tferdaise profile page
    0
    The argument between the time it takes one to get their ADN vs BSN is a mood point. People say, it only takes 2 years to get a ADN but it take 4 years to get a BSN. This is not true, both degree's take the same amount of time if you include all the pre-reqs.

    Here in AZ where there was such a nursing shortage it didn't matter if you had a BSN or ADN, once you finished school and took your boards you had a job. Times have changed, many of new grads (mostly ADNs) can not find a job. But BSNs are not they are being hired over ADN new grad nurses.

    I'm happy I have my BSN, it has opened more doors then if I had my ADN, but of course this is a regional requirement.


    Quote from tk0224
    I'm glad Canada changed their entry to practice requirement to BScN in 2005. Nobody is able to argue over this anymore. We still have diploma RNs who have been grandfathered into the system and encouraged to go back, but it really cuts down on a lot of this "who is better than who" crap. We now simply have ONE avenue to take to become an RN, and ONE avenue to take to be an LPN (with the exception of Quebec).

    Also, I think in today's world - students entering the nursing profession should be degree prepared - it most definitely adds to the professionalism of the profession itself, I don't care what anyone says. With the patient acuity nowadays, RNs play a much larger role in the care of individuals than ever before, and the role continues to evolve. With this comes the need for more education!

    I totally understand many people who don't have the time nor money to invest in a BScN - but if you take a look at Canada, many programs are popping up now that take 2-3 years (same timeframe as an ADN in the USA) for a baccalaureate degree. I would not be surprised to see many more of these types of programs popping up over the country in the near future either.

    If nursing wants to truly move forward, and really gain the credit/respect it deserves - streamlining practice at the degree level is a perfect way to start that process. Many older nurses in Canada might disagree, but it's working well here I think, and there is a lot less disrespect for our fellow nurses as well

    Just my 2 cents. I am proud to be a BScN, RN
  12. Visit  katmeup7 profile page
    0
    Even though I am an ASN nurse with a BA in a related field, I am glad that a BSN is becoming the standard of entry level nursing. I believe it is what the profession of nursing needs to legitimize itself once and for all.

    If I had to do it over again, I would have gone for my BSN, but probably after obtaining my ADN and then working and letting a hospital help me pay for a BSN. I'm reaching retirement age now and do not regret my path, but I've certainly met a lot of ADN RNs in my career who needed a broader education. I think the ADN of today is considered the LPN of the past.

    As an aside, however, it's been my experience that a lot of medical schools are becoming easier, and some of the med school grads I interact with seem like highly educated physician assistants. Go figure.
  13. Visit  STLCCSTUDENT profile page
    0
    I live in the St. Louis area and from what i can see some hospitals prefer BSN but that doesn't mean you can't find a job with only your ADN. I am getting my RN, i have a friend who just graduated with her BSN. She has $50,000 in student loans and i will have no debt when i graduate, and starting pay is about the same ADN-$20.00/hr BSN-$20.50. Is 50 cents an hour more really worth $50,000 in loans plus interest? I didn't think so. Yes, BSN are first in line for promotions and can manage a floor, but if your a new grad, its not like you'll be doing that anyway right out of college. Plus if you want your BSN a lot of the time you can get the hospital to pay for it. From what i've seen the #1 thing hospitals look for is experience! Yes, if a new grad RN and BSN apply for the same job the BSN will probably get it. But if an RN with 2 years experience applies for a job vs a new BSN the RN will get it. But nurses are needed so bad that probably both will get a job! I'd say if you have plenty of money to put toward your education, go for the BSN. If not get your ADN.

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