How long does it take to get an Associates Degree in Nursing? - page 3

by Ted D

21,839 Views | 32 Comments

I already have a bachelors degree, however I have not taken any nursing related pre-req classes. So I am thinking of going back, taking the TEAS, and going to a technical school for my ADN. Are some technical/vocational... Read More


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    Yes, it was Chem I and II. No organic chemistry was necessary. I have a non-science degree and it was difficult, but do-able. I applied to the program after 2 semesters at the cc. Again, each school has its own requirements and its own admissions game.
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    Quote from Ted D
    Do you have a link to the program that didn't require Chem?

    haha I'm serious
    Only one school I attended required Chem, and it was a basic intro to Chem class for non-majors that was a pre-req for Micro.
    I can't really say whether an accelerated BSN or an ADN would be better for you, having had no experience with BSNs, but these are all community colleges that I've been looking at. They're scattered throughout Texas. Search the major cities and you'll find most of the ones I've looked at
  3. 0
    Moved to the Registered Nurses forum. Good luck to you!
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    It took me 3 years to get my AS. I already had a BA, so I didn't need to take as many pre-requisites, but I still had to take Biology, Anatomy 1 and 2, Sociology, Chemistry, Microbiology, Human Growth and Development, and Drug Calculations. I was working full-time, so I took 2 classes a term, including summer.
    Last edit by Not_A_Hat_Person on Jul 17, '09 : Reason: more information
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    Regarding Chemistry:

    There has been a strong push for several years now by several nursing education and professional groups to get all two and three year programs to require chemistry. Some schools, especially the smaller programs have fought back claiming they cannot afford to hire the staff and or build chem labs where non already exist. Programs that are part of colleges and universities are perhaps better off because they normally have chemistry teachers and labs already, but this can also mean nursing students take the same chemistry classes as/with pre-med and pharm students which can be a bit more intense than say "Chemistry for Nurses".

    Another problem is that many community college students did not complete the required chemistry classes in high school, which means they may have to take either a remedial chemistry or perhaps a general chemistry class before taking whatever chemistry is required for the program. Either way it means a student would be pushed back a semester.
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    My program took 3.5 years full time. 1.5 years of pre and co-reqs and then 2 years as a nursing major. We had to take Bio, A&P 1 and 2, chemistry, and college algebra to apply. Then I also took all the co-req's (non-nursing) courses at the same time because I was told that once you are in the program, there is no time to do anything but your nursing courses and that was 100% true. Those were microbiology, 2 psych classes, 2 english, sociology, a computer course etc...

    The thought that an ASN is "only 2 years" is far from true, unless you have already taken all of the other required non-nursing courses for another degree within 5 years.

    It was very competetive to get into my program. I was told you need a 3.8 to 4.0 to get in, and I had a 4.0. Most of my class had a 4.0 or 3.9 coming into the program. We usually have about 500 applicants for 100 seats, and that is why only high GPAs get in. I think that is pretty much the case everywhere.

    Good luck if you go for it!
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    Since I already have a BA too , im doing the accelerated BSN program. It is the same amount of time as ASN
  8. 0
    If I've learned anything in life so far it's this - there are no shortcuts and no easy ways to get ahead.

    I had an interview at a vocational/technical school here (San Diego) a few weeks ago. I had just turned 28 and was feeling a bit "antsy" to jump on on my nursing degree and get somewhere fast. The thought of waiting lists, prerequisites and critical gpa's made me very nervous. I thought there must be a better way. But when the sales rep. (and boy was she...) from Concorde sat down with me, I realized what a horrible choice I was being presented with. For over thirty thousand dollars I could have obtained my LVN certification in one year, which would allow me to apply to a 1.5 year LVN to RN program. The short length was tempting, but at what price? After doing my homework and having a major reality check, I've decided to harness my existing bachelor's degree and start the prereq's for an accelerated BSN program here. The lesson I learned is what I stated above...just do the work, don't focus on the time - for me, I can not imagine what I could do with the next three years of my life that would set me up for any greater sucess.
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    ADN programs are extremely competitive so be sure to pass all your prereq with above average grades
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    Here in Wisconsin's Technical colleges (community college) it takes 4 semesters to get an ADN-RN. There are no pre-reqs for most people who graduated from high school. There are sixteen technical colleges in Wisconsin. All of them have nursing programs. Waiting lists are from none to 5 years depending on what school you want to go to. The one I went to claimed they had a one year waiting list but in realiety there wasn't one. All the programs are pretty much the same. All of the non nursing classes (except for micro and A&P I & II) and quite a few of the nursing classes can be taken online and will transfer to any other technical college in Wisconsin no questions asked. They are also very liberal in allowing classed done at other schools.
    Here is the web site for one school's nursing program. They are all pretty much the same. Some schools also have a part time, evening and weekend program for those who must continue to work full time while in nursing school.

    http://www.swtc.edu/gray_map.aspx?id=105431


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