BSN vs. RN?

  1. 0
    What is the difference? I know a BSN is necessary for management position as well as going into Public Health. Is there anything else that I'm missing? Why would one want to go the BSN route?

    Thanks =)
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    1. A lot of jobs are "BSN preferred," not just jobs in management and public health. There are all sorts of jobs in nursing in areas such as infection control, case management, diabetes educator, ostomy coordinator, lactation consultant, discharge planner, research coordinator, project manager, patient educator, etc. etc. etc. etc. for which a BSN is an asset. You may see some people without BSN's fulfilling these roles, but an increasing number of employers are preferring to fill any positions beyond the entry level staff nurse positions with BSN-prepared staff.

    2. Some people simply like the additional depth and breadth of knowledge that is available in a BSN program. (Though I readily acknowledge that a poor quality BSN program does not provide a better education than a high quality Diploma or ADN program. But a good quality BSN program should provide the best entry level education if all other things are equal.)

    3. Some people are considering getting a graduate degree, for which a BSN is a necessary step.

    4. Some people are committed to helping the nursing profession gain the same status within our society that other health care professions have, which will probably require the BSN to become the minimal entry-level degree to qualify for the professional role.

    That's just a few reasons off the top of my head.
  5. 0
    Well, the main point to consider is that ANYTHING you want to do at some point in your career that may require the BSN (grad school, public health, management, staff education, pharm/medical equipment sales rep, etc.) is inaccessible if you don't have it. If you were to reach a point in your career where you wanted away from the bedside ASAP, would you rather have the BSN in hand, or would you rather have to complete an RN-BSN program and THEN get to move on? You may not think you will ever want to be anything other than a staff nurse right now, and you may never change your mind, but for some, burnout does happen and if/when it does - it is nice be able to pursue other options immediately rather than being trapped while you scramble to earn a bachelor's degree, wouldn't you agree?
  6. 0
    What if you have a Bachelors in another discipline and are a diploma RN with the option to do a RN-MS without getting a BSN. Does this hinder you for management, etc.. or do you have to take all those extra steps of obtaining another B.S. Im in that boat right now trying to weigh the options of doing RN-BSN/MSN or RN-MS Just wondering with all of the new different bridge programs these days ???
  7. 0
    Quote from RNstudent006
    What if you have a Bachelors in another discipline and are a diploma RN with the option to do a RN-MS without getting a BSN. Does this hinder you for management, etc.. or do you have to take all those extra steps of obtaining another B.S. Im in that boat right now trying to weigh the options of doing RN-BSN/MSN or RN-MS Just wondering with all of the new different bridge programs these days ???
    Yes, you can do RN-MSN, but you will have to pick up "bridge" courses that would have been earned in a BSN program. Which ones you have to take varies from school to school, but community health is almost always required. Whatever you have to take as a bridge, it slows you down when you compare it to a BSN to MSN program.
  8. 0
    The military requires a BSN to become a commissioned Nurse Corps Officer. I don't know about the VA.
    Locally, the public school system requires a BSN.
    Some grad schools require a BSN for certain programs such as Nurse Practitioner, and will not accept someone who is RN-MSN but never got the BSN or was RN with BA/BS in other field then got an MSN.


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