ER Nurse Interested in Radiology

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    I have been an ER nurse for 10 years and I am in dire need of a change. I submitted my resume for a radiology group that requires ER or ICU experience and was contacted for an interview. The problem is that I am not exactly sure what a radiology nurse does. I am assuming it involves cardiac monitoring, conscious sedation, IV insertion etc. I am excited for the opportunity for change and I want to do well in my interview. Any information would be greatly appreciated!
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    I just transferred from PEDS ED to Peds Rad. I do lots of iv insertions, caths, port a caths access, drop ngs for contrast. We basically preop the kids prior to GA for the MRI's, then we recover them in a little mini PACU. We also scrub in for IR procedures, inject contrast etc. It's a nice change of pace while still being short stay with your patients
    RNFiona likes this.
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    Thanks! I got the job
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    If it does not work for you with the special procedures RN, I am in Florida and looking for Special Procedures RN's and Cath Lab RN's. At Brandon Regional hopsital we are desperately searching for a Cath Lab RN and willing to train! Good luck with the interview!
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    Hi, I am also an ER nurse looking to do something different. I have 2+ years experience in the ER, but I found that I want to try something else. My ER manager said that I would be more fit to do ICU nursing in her opinion, she said that I am very detail oriented and meticulous in my work. However, I like the radiology nurse hours that I am applying for which is (9am-5pm Monday through Friday). I didn't like working 3 twelve hour shifts (I worked all 12 hr shifts, nights/evenings/days in my 2 year ER career), I felt very burned out by the end of the day and I ended up sleeping all day on my days off or too tired to do anything. Also, I was very stressed all the time and it carried over in my personal relationship with my significant other. What I liked about ER nursing is that you didn't have the same patients all the time, you treated them and then they always had some place to go, either sent to the floor or went home. I would assume radiology is the same way, you tx the patient and then they go back to ICU, ER, or the floor, fast paced, but hopefully less stress than ER where you would have many holds (well, at least at my hospital). Anyway, looking for a good change, wondering if there are any radiology nurses that love their jobs and what they specifically like about radiology nursing? Also, I don't have any children, but would like to one day. Is the job too "dangerous" or would I become sterile from working in radiology?--I know there are protections and it sounds silly to ask, but I am still worried. Can you please tell me radiology nurses what protections your hospital gives you from radiation? I have an interview soon for the position, are there any tips you can give me for the radiology nurse position? Also, I love starting IVs!, do you start many IVs in your job, what other procedures do you do? Thanks! ER-RN-looking-for-a-change.
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    Quote from rnlookingforcareer
    .... looking for a good change, wondering if there are any radiology nurses that love their jobs and what they specifically like about radiology nursing? Also, I don't have any children, but would like to one day. Is the job too "dangerous" or would I become sterile from working in radiology?--I know there are protections and it sounds silly to ask, but I am still worried. Can you please tell me radiology nurses what protections your hospital gives you from radiation? I have an interview soon for the position, are there any tips you can give me for the radiology nurse position? Also, I love starting IVs!, do you start many IVs in your job, what other procedures do you do? Thanks! ER-RN-looking-for-a-change.
    I worked Radiology X21 years, loved it.
    Our department was dynamic, Radiology Nursing is dynamic.
    New procedures, new innovations, new techniques . . .

    I liked that it was fast-paced but I only had one pt at a time to care for.
    Started a LOT of IVs, although these days in a lot of centers the techs start the IVs.
    RNs are called if there is a possible contrast reaction.
    The hospital, the Radiology (or Imaging) Department is MANDATED to protect employees from more-than-necessary radiation exposure.
    Lead aprons for everyone involved in fluoroscopic procedures, and everyone exposed to radiation wears a badge that is sensitive to radiation. Badge is exchanged monthly for a new one, the exposed badge submitted to a company that measures and reports monthly exposure and cumulative exposure.
    Radiation Safety Officer and department manager review these reports.

    I worked through two pregnancies and delivered healthy children.
    My radiation exposure was severely limited during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester.
    Co-workers and Radiologists were watchful, waiting till I left the procedure room to activate fluoroscopy (I always wore wraparound lead as a precaution).

    There is a lot of physical labor (standing, walking, bending, squatting, reaching).
    Sometimes sitting.

    Each facility's requirements for Nursing may differ.
    Ask what will be the RN's duties/responsibilities (these days may be a lot of moderate sedation administration and patient monitoring).
    Will you be transporting of patients?
    Shadow one of the nurses for a day, to better get an idea of the duties and working environment.

    Again, I started a lot of IVs (sometimes 20+ per day), for CT scans and IVPs.
    (interviewed a lot of pts on the fly, as I was setting up the supplies --- screening for allergies, previous reactions, how nervous are they? [more nervous = higher chance of reactions], expectations? )
    Performed catheterizations for VCUG exams (on 2-month-olds to 12 year-olds to adults).
    Prepped pts, set up supplies and helped with
    * angiograms (we RNs helped in the Cath Lab as well)
    * nephrostomy tube and stent placements
    * biopsies (CT- and US- and fluoro-guided: lung, renal, liver)
    * needle aspirations (FNA = fine needle aspiration)
    * abscess drainages (CT- and US-guided: any body cavity)
    * paracentesis and thoracentesis
    * myelograms
    * embolizations
    and probably more but these are the most common procedures we helped with.

    Also helped with administering sedation for claustrophobic pts undergoing MRI.

    Did a lot of patient teaching pre- and post-procedure.

    Made up billing sheets, patient instruction sheets, supply lists (for inventory and ordering) . . .

    Wrote protocols, SOPs.

    Check out ARIN https://www.arinursing.org/ Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing

    I now work exclusively in a Cath Lab (and doing other Cardiac-related studies/duties).
    I miss working in Imaging but still very much enjoy what I do.

    I hope the interview goes well and if the job fits, that you enjoy the area!


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