No dogs allowed in room

  1. 0
    I went to my new home hospice orientation. They said that this kind of hospice is called continuous care hospice in the home. They said a nurse got bit by a dog in the home. They said at first the dog had been friendly but then as the owner's condition worsened the dog then became overly-protective and bit the nurse. So now the policy is that no dogs are allowed in the patient's room when the nurse is on duty(nurses usually work 12 hour shifts). It seems so sad that a dying person can't have his dog with him when he is dying. . They also said that the patient's home caregiver such as wife can only leave for short periods such as not being gone for more than one hour and a half. It seems a shame that the wife can't spend her time anyway she chooses such as taking a day off and getting out of house. I would think that if you had a nurse for 12 hours that it would be an ideal time to get out of the house and get all of your stuff done.
  2. 2,053 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 18 Comments so far...

  4. 8
    Both of these restrictions strike me as being against the spirit of hospice. We can't go into people's homes and dictate their daily activity and make house rules for them. I feel very sorry for the people affected by this.
  5. 3
    That's the first I've heard of a home hospice making rules like that. I think I'd be tempted to forget to shut the door to the room where the patient was.

    The only reason I could think for not allowing the primary caregiver in the home to stay out more than an hour and a half would be if the patient was very unstable.
    BrookeeLou_RN, tewdles, and Blackcat99 like this.
  6. 0
    Thanks caliotter3and nurse156. Unfortunately, this is the only home hospice in my area. I have sure had some strange job experiences since coming to Florida. Yes, maybe I could "forget" to close the door.
  7. 0
    I forgot to mention some other things about this agency. No one can give you a ride to work because that is a HIPAA violation. The nurse is also required to bring her own thermometer and her own blood pressure machine.
    If a hospice patient dies on your shift you have to destoy all of the medications. All of the medications have to be poured into kitty litter and then disposed of. It is the nurses responsibility to bring her own cat litter with them to work. Florida is something else!!!! First you have to pay a bunch of money to even get a job interview. Then when you get a job you have to go out and buy all of your own supplies. What will they think of next? Will I be required to bring my own wheelchair and walker too in case a patient needs a wheelchair or walker?
  8. 2
    I am always buying certain supplies. I find that better than trying to do my job without the things I need, particularly when no interest is shown in remedying the situation. It is standard for hospice nurses to dispose of the meds, however, the agency will tell you that you are to use something available in the home. Of course, every home has a cat and the clients all drink coffee.
    tewdles and Blackcat99 like this.
  9. 4
    Are you actually in the home 12 hours a day? That is so great for patients to have that available. If you are seeing several patients in a day, then it is reasonable to ban the puppy from the room while you are examining (I have a patient now that has an ankle biter, and the family puts her away when I visit, to protect her I think because I've made it very clear that I WILL punt the little runt like a football if it does try to bite me). It's a little tricky with the 12 hour shifts. I think it's in the best interest of the patient to tell the nurses that they will have to work around said doggy if the patient wants the dog there. I wouldn't take that away from the patient. There are ways to manage dogs.
  10. 1
    Quote from Blackcat99
    I forgot to mention some other things about this agency. No one can give you a ride to work because that is a HIPAA violation. The nurse is also required to bring her own thermometer and her own blood pressure machine.
    It may be time to hang up my nurse shoes if this kind of thing seems normal to people. If your car has a dead battery do you have to abandon your vehicle and walk home because the Auto Club guy, the tow truck guy would then know where you worked? I know having an independent method of transportation is part of being in home health, but c'mon! You don't have to tell the taxi driver who lives at the house or why you are there!
    If a hospice patient dies on your shift you have to destoy all of the medications. All of the medications have to be poured into kitty litter and then disposed of. It is the nurses responsibility to bring her own cat litter with them to work.
    It's probably a good idea to have a BP cuff and thermometer just in case, but couldn't they spring for the kitty litter? How very odd.

    Tencat - agree for a short visit doggie can stay out. I had a pt with an ankle biter (and was an annoying little runt as it was) I got the "but he never bites anyone else!" like it's my fault?? I just about had to dropkick the thing before they got the message!
    GHGoonette likes this.
  11. 0
    Thanks all. Yes, I will just have 1 patient. I will be in the home doing private duty hospice for 1 patient for 12 hours. Yikes, I had not even thought about those little dogs who are ankle biters-ouch!!!! Yes, when my car breaks down I will not work that day. I will call them and cancel. And they better not argue with me either!!!! After all, if they are going to make these stupid rules by God I am going to abide by them. I am thinking though that they will tell me to come in but have the taxi drop me off 3 houses away. However, I'm not going to take a chance. God forbid if that taxi guy would watch me to see what house I actually go into!!!! I will use the day off to my advantage and spend the day getting my car fixed.
  12. 1
    Quote from nursel56
    That's the first I've heard of a home hospice making rules like that. I think I'd be tempted to forget to shut the door to the room where the patient was.
    As a nurse who has been attacked by a dog (though not on the job), I disagree. Too many dog owners are totally blind to their dog's bad behavior, and I don't want to end up in the ER (again) while the owner is swearing up and down that "he's never done that before!" If the agency has had to give worker's comp to 1 nurse because of a client's dog, I think banning the dog from the room is better than dropping the client.
    Blackcat99 likes this.


Top