Will a hospital pay for me to go to nursing school?

  1. 0 First off, I'd like to say hi! I'm new here. And I'm sorry if I put this in the wrong forum, lol.

    I have a question. I'm a senior in high school, and I live in Texas, the Houston area, and I want to go to Tomball Community College to take my pre-reqs, then apply for nursing school (I want to get my associates).

    I was just curious; I've heard of hospitals paying your way, and that that are some ways they do this; that after you're certified you either have to work for them for some amount of years, or volunteer, sometimes they pay it off, or they pay if you choose to get a higher degree. But would I qualify for that? And if I did, would they pay for my pre-reqs or only nursing school after I got accepted?

    Also, when contacting HR at a hospital, how would I ask them? Lol. I know it sounds weird and it's not that I'm embarrassed or anything, I just don't know what I would say/ how to ask.

    So if you know how would go about doing all of this, please help me, lol. I would really appreciate it.
    I'm clueless when it comes to these kinds of things.

    Thanks so much.


    -Nikki
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  3. Visit  easywitheyesclosed} profile page

    About easywitheyesclosed

    24 Years Old; Joined Jan '09; Posts: 2.

    12 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  SuesquatchRN} profile page
    0
    That's more likely in an area with a shortage, and I don't believe, Nikki, that TX has one.

    Good luck.
  5. Visit  r0b0tafflicti0n} profile page
    0
    Look into hospital-based RN programs; the hospital where I work (in Pittsburgh) has its own nursing schools, and if you sign a 2 year contract they will pay it in its entirety.

    You could also go the route of getting a job now (food service, cashier, nurses aide, receptionist, gift shop, whatever) at a hospital that offers tuition benefits. These would usually be advertised as part of the benefit package on their website, or ask HR if they have tuition benefits.
  6. Visit  bluemalibu} profile page
    0
    +1 Rbt/Aflt...

    This is good advice. Our local hospital starts new grads at $72,800. They offer to reimburse all costs (including pre-req courses, equipment, uniforms, and books) to their hourly service employees that sign an agreement to work for them at full salary following RN school.
  7. Visit  mdrider} profile page
    0
    Hi, Nikki -- you might be interested in this article from the Austin Business Journal (Feb. 6th):

    Coalition to state lawmakers: Spend money now to fight nursing shortage (in TX)
    http://www.bizjournals.com/austin/st...2/daily51.html
    "The Texas Nursing Workforce Shortage Coalition addressed state lawmakers today, urging them to allocate $60 million in funding to combat Texas' shortage of nurses."
  8. Visit  LiraStone} profile page
    0
    I'm in Michigan but will relocate for the right reason. Which hospital do you work at. I want to inquire more!
  9. Visit  r0b0tafflicti0n} profile page
    0
    University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

    http://www.upmc.com/careersatupmc/nu...-programs.aspx
  10. Visit  r0b0tafflicti0n} profile page
    0
    Also, BlueMalibu, where are you where new grads make so much!? NPs don't even make that much here. . .I can't wait to move away:/
  11. Visit  Jenifer819} profile page
    1
    Nikki,

    First of all, good for you on a having your educational and career path all mapped out when you're a senior in HS!!! Okay, I rec'd my ADN from Tomball College (aka Lone Star as it's now called) in May '07. I applied for scholarships and rec'd two $1000 scholarships. Go to the Lone Star College Foundation office and ask for an application. It is so simple. You fill it out, get 2 recommendations, and the foundation will match you with a scholarship. Also, Tomball hospital offers scholarships, but you must apply through the foundation at the college. I told my friends to apply for our 2nd year in nursing school and ALL of them got scholarships. Not many people know about it...not sure why. Anyway, I ended up spending probably $1K for school for books, stethoscope, etc. The scholarships paid for the classes, fees, etc.

    Good luck to you!!!! Jenifer
    easywitheyesclosed likes this.
  12. Visit  bluemalibu} profile page
    0
    Quote from r0b0tafflicti0n
    Also, BlueMalibu, where are you where new grads make so much!? NPs don't even make that much here. . .I can't wait to move away:/
    I'm in Northern California... sunny 'C'!

    My sister completed PA school about six months ago. (PA's and NP's attend the exact same training here) She is working for an oncology clinic here now for 138 a year, so no, the wages aren't bad here.
    Last edit by bluemalibu on Feb 11, '09
  13. Visit  brillohead} profile page
    0
    Quote from bluemalibu
    I'm in Northern California... sunny 'C'!

    My sister completed PA school about six months ago. (PA's and NP's attend the exact same training here) She is working for an oncology clinic here now for 138 a year, so no, the wages aren't bad here.
    But you can't buy a three-bedroom, 1.5 bathroom house on half an acre with an inground pool for $112,000 there, either. There's a reason wages are higher in some states... the cost of living is higher in some states!
  14. Visit  bluemalibu} profile page
    0
    Quote from brillohead
    There's a reason wages are higher in some states... the cost of living is higher in some states!
    '

    Of course... there's no such thing as a free lunch. Set your priorities and then make your choices.
  15. Visit  chemistry03} profile page
    0
    Hello all,

    I have a question along the same lines as the original post. In the Fall I will be entering my senior year of undergraduate education. I am a chemistry major but have decided to change my career goals to nursing (if I weren't a senior, I would change my major to nursing). I am therefore looking into a number of accelerated programs. My question is though, should I go for an accelerated BSN program or do a straight-shot direct entry masters kind of program for students with a non-nursing bachelor's degree? I've been looking at the costs for the direct entry master's programs and I'm starting to freak out . If I do the accelerated BSN option does anyone know if I could begin working and then have my employer pay for graduate school? Or is that not a common occurence and I should just go straight for the MSN if I am accepted and just take out a bunch of loans? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated and I hope this wasn't too confusing


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