vocational school or reg College??

  1. I really need some advice here. I cant decide if I should do a vocational school that will take alot less time or go to City College that will for sure take a really long time. Does it really matter where you went to school when looking for a job? I know its alot more expensive to go to a vocational school but the time thing is an issue for me. I am just worried that its not as good as reg college. I am also wondering how it will work later on if I want to become an RN. Can I just go back to reg school and take the classes to become an RN even if i graduated from a vocational school??

    My husband wants me to do the 2 yr vocational program since its fast but I'm just not sure thats going to be good in the long run.

    Any advice?? TIA!
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   CuriousMe
    I'm sorry, I'm a little confused. What degree/certification would you get at each school? Would you be trying to be an LPN at vocational school and trying to get your RN at the college?

    Peace,
    Cathie
  4. by   MaMaJ9804
    Sorry about that! I am wanting to become a LVN and there is a 2yr program for that at a local vocational school OR I would have to start fresh at City college and take all the pre-reqs, wait to get into the nursing program and because I would be going part time it would take a looong time. I am just wondering if vocational schools are as good as a nursing program at a college.
  5. by   CuriousMe
    I don't think it's a question of better or worse, it seems like you're talking about two different licenses.

    The vocational school will prepare you to be a LVN and the city college an RN. If it were my decision, I'd put some numbers to each choice. How much will it cost to become a LVN? How long will the program take?

    Then I would define how long, a looooong time really is. Look at all the prereqs you'll need (don't forget to include the prereqs for the prereqs and any developmental writing or math classes you may need) and figure out how much money and time getting an RN will take.

    Once you have these specific numbers, they you just need to decide whether you want to be an LVN or an RN. What kind of nursing do you think you might want to do? In general (there are always exceptions) an RN will give you more choices....but if you can get what you want as an LVN, then that works as well.

    Best of luck!!

    Peace,
    Cathie
  6. by   caliotter3
    A big advantage to taking an LPN or RN program at a community college is that later on, some, if not all, of your courses will transfer to another college should you want to pursue a BSN or MSN. Most vocational schools do not provide courses that will transfer, so you must reinvest time and money at a later date if you want to proceed with your education. Best of luck in your decision.
  7. by   Logos
    Go to the college- imo
  8. by   RNsRWe
    Like Cathie said, you have to compare numbers, pros and cons for each program. Think about what kind of nursing job you'd like to have in the future, and see where that leaves you, too. In many places, LPN/LVNs are limited to nursing homes and medical offices; many acute care facilities and hospitals require RN licensure now. Then again, that too varies by geographic area. Look at the kind of job you'd like to have, and see if the vocational school license will get you there. Then decide if that's where you want to stay.

    If you decide to move to an RN later, realize that the credits earned at a vocational school rarely if ever transfer. There are programs that consider your LVN as a way of skipping the fundamentals course (usually by testing out) but not always. There are bridge programs of LVN to RN, but you need to know that this is an option for you, too, based on schools in your area.

    Alot to consider
  9. by   jlhall1976
    If you are able to put forth the time for a 2 yr program, then you should consider getting your associate's in RN. The time spent getting a LVN may not pay out financially in the long run. The average pay scale is around $7.45 per/hr versus the thousands of dollars put forth to pay for the school. Most nursing homes will hire you without a certificate and pay you about the same. The difference for you would be the student loans that you would need to pay back. If you are able to attend an RN program, you can stand to make in upwards to $20 per/hr to start. Plus, many hospitals, clinics, & private practices are limiting their searches for RN's. In addition, many hospitals around the nation will pay back your students loans in part or even in full in exchange for a contract to work for them for a certain length of time. This equals a guarenteed job minus the student loans plus fully paid medical/dental/optical benefits for you and your family. I hope this helps!
  10. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from jlhall1976
    If you are able to put forth the time for a 2 yr program, then you should consider getting your associate's in RN. The time spent getting a LVN may not pay out financially in the long run. The average pay scale is around $7.45 per/hr versus the thousands of dollars put forth to pay for the school. Most nursing homes will hire you without a certificate and pay you about the same. The difference for you would be the student loans that you would need to pay back. If you are able to attend an RN program, you can stand to make in upwards to $20 per/hr to start. Plus, many hospitals, clinics, & private practices are limiting their searches for RN's. In addition, many hospitals around the nation will pay back your students loans in part or even in full in exchange for a contract to work for them for a certain length of time. This equals a guarenteed job minus the student loans plus fully paid medical/dental/optical benefits for you and your family. I hope this helps!

    $7.45/hr and getting hired without certifcation sounds more like a CNA (certified nurse assistant) not an LPN/LVN (Licenced Practical Nurse/Licenced Vocational Nurse).

    Peace,
    Cathie
  11. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from CuriousMe
    $7.45/hr and getting hired without certifcation sounds more like a CNA (certified nurse assistant) not an LPN/LVN (Licenced Practical Nurse/Licenced Vocational Nurse).

    Peace,
    Cathie
    Yeah, I was thinking that too. Actually, our CNAs make a good amount over that, too. LPNs, more like double this rate. And it's a license

    I'd imagine the pay in CA is also MUCH better for any of these options than what's quoted here.

    Personally, I say go for the RN
  12. by   MaMaJ9804
    Thanks so much for the advice! I have decided NOT to go with a vocational school and actually go for my RN. I am really excited!! I'm pretty nervous but I know I can do it!! Thanks again!
  13. by   justme1972
    Regular college. The vocational school LVN program here (that I considered for like, one day), is a 2 year program, but at the CC it is a 1 year program.
  14. by   centralflorida
    So there are no vocational schools around that have two year associate's in nursing? There are a ton of them - and of course they're MUCH more expensive than community college - in Florida. The one year program at the vocational colleges is an LVN program.

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