Frantic Question

  1. 0 If I have a Non-nursing degree (Health Care Administration) Associates Degree, can I get my BSN?

    Right now I am applying for a LPN program and I was later going to take a bridge from LPN to BSN online. But is it necessary? Can I just go straight into a BSN program since I am an Associates Degree holder?

    I have all my pre-reqs done for LPN/RN programs... so lots of anatomy and math and such...

    Please help!!
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  3. Visit  CallieNM} profile page

    About CallieNM

    From 'Georgia'; Joined Jul '12; Posts: 274; Likes: 98.

    25 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  delawaremalenurse} profile page
    1
    you can go to a BSN program but you'll need to meet with an advisor to see if the pre-reqs you took were the right level and right amount for the program...don't be surprised if you have to take additional classes

    LPN programs often do not require the same difficulty level of classes nor the same amount of classes needed for an RN program (ADN or BSN)
    Anelite2014 likes this.
  5. Visit  CallieNM} profile page
    0
    Quote from delawaremalenurse
    you can go to a BSN program but you'll need to meet with an advisor to see if the pre-reqs you took were the right level and right amount for the program...don't be surprised if you have to take additional classes

    LPN programs often do not require the same difficulty level of classes nor the same amount of classes needed for an RN program (ADN or BSN)
    Well I did everything for RN up until last semester. I didn't get to microbiology then I switched to LPN. So does that sound promising?
  6. Visit  marycarney} profile page
    0
    There are two types of BSN programs.

    One is pre-licensure, in other words, you are not a nurse until you graduate and take NCLEX.

    The other is a 'completion' program. It is for either LPNs (rare) or for associate degree nurses who are already RNs.

    You would be looking at a BSN pre-licensure program. You would have the same chance of getting in as anyone else who had most of their pre-requisite course work completed. Having an associate's would gain you no advantage.

    Just want you to be comparing apples-to-apples.
  7. Visit  CallieNM} profile page
    0
    Quote from marycarney
    There are two types of BSN programs.

    One is pre-licensure, in other words, you are not a nurse until you graduate and take NCLEX.

    The other is a 'completion' program. It is for either LPNs (rare) or for associate degree nurses who are already RNs.

    You would be looking at a BSN pre-licensure program. You would have the same chance of getting in as anyone else who had most of their pre-requisite course work completed. Having an associate's would gain you no advantage.

    Just want you to be comparing apples-to-apples.
    So if you were in my shoes... What would you do? Continue with the original plan get my LPN and then do the bridges? Or try to get my BSN now?

    What about clinical?

    I want the best education, keeping finances in mind (I'm not made of money) that will get me the furthest in my career. I don't want to feel like repeating my "expired" science courses this last year was a huge waste because the school told me it was impossible to get a BSN with my associates. Come to find out I may be able to at another school nearby...
  8. Visit  Stephalump} profile page
    2
    I'm not entirely sure what an unrelated associates degree has to do with anything...I've never heard of a BSN program that cares about that. They care that you meet the prereqs and pass whatever entrance exam.

    What exactly were you told about BSN programs at your current school?

    The easiest thing to do is look at your prospective school's website. They're usually very specific and clear about requirements. If they aren't, buyer beware.
    BuckyBadgerRN and marycarney like this.
  9. Visit  CallieNM} profile page
    0
    Quote from Stephalump
    I'm not entirely sure what an unrelated associates degree has to do with anything...I've never heard of a BSN program that cares about that. They care that you meet the prereqs and pass whatever entrance exam.

    What exactly were you told about BSN programs at your current school?

    The easiest thing to do is look at your prospective school's website. They're usually very specific and clear about requirements. If they aren't, buyer beware.
    I was told I had to be an RN to get into the BSN program. My associates degree is in health care administration and they said it would not work. So I hope that expensive piece of paper on my wall and started all over again with RN classes, last semester I realized the RN program is nearly impossible to get into right away and I am ready to get working, so instead applied to LPN which starts in Spring.

    I saw somewhere that you could use a non nursing associates degree to get into a bachelors degree program, but MaryCarney above is probably right about there being different types of bachelors degrees. I may end up just be better off sticking with LPN and then moving forward from there.

    My friend is currently in an online program to be LPN to BSN and she loves it. It is through Indiana State University and its legit. But I was hoping my useless Associates degree may be able to get me into a bachelors degree...

    Does any of this make sense?
  10. Visit  Stephalump} profile page
    0
    It makes sense . There are bridge programs and straightforward programs, yes. If your school only offers a bridge program, then, no, a non nursing associate degree wouldn't work.

    Most 4 year schools around here offer both types : a pre-licensure BSN and an RN-BSN, but the pre-licensure is faster (2 years ADN+1year bridge vs 2 year BSN). We also have one school that also has an LVN-BSN program. I don't think one way is any better than the other, just different needs for different people. I'm in an ADN program that has an articulation agreement with an RN-BSN program so I'll hopefully be starting right after graduation. It takes a year longer than the traditional route, but I'll save about $10,000.
  11. Visit  CallieNM} profile page
    0
    bachelor of science in nursing (bsn)the wellstar college of health and human services offers a program of study in nursing leading to a bachelor of science in nursing (bsn) degree. this program is fully accredited by the commission on collegiate nursing education (ccne). in addition, this program leads to eligibility for initial licensure as a registered nurse and consists of a traditional curriculum plan and an accelerated option for students holding a bachelors degree in another field. a bsn completion option is also available for persons who are already registered nurses. all three program options combine nursing courses with general education courses. the general education courses provide a broad scope of liberal education for the nursing program and serve as a foundation for functioning in a civil society and learning nursing concepts. students may declare nursing as a major and begin taking the general education component of either program, at any time.
    the baccalaureate degree sequence for prelicensure students is offered as outlined in the curriculum guide. since there are a limited number of spaces in the program, prospective students must apply to the bsn program for admission with a cohort for each clinical sequence of the program."

    copied from the school's website i was thinking about checking on. from what i put into red i think i will be able to apply because it is prelicensure program. man, i think i am going to be sick. i feel like i have wasted so much time, resources, money... omg...
  12. Visit  marycarney} profile page
    1
    It makes sense. But understand that your associate's degree does not really prepare you for any type of specific medical career - expensive or not. Sorry to be so blunt - but it is the truth. Sounds like the program you're looking at is a completion program - and as such, you do not qualify. LPN would be a viable option. I started out as an LPN - and now I have a master's in nursing. Good luck to you. Hope we've been able to clarify things for you.
    CallieNM likes this.
  13. Visit  CallieNM} profile page
    0
    Quote from marycarney
    It makes sense. But understand that your associate's degree does not really prepare you for any type of specific medical career - expensive or not. Sorry to be so blunt - but it is the truth. Sounds like the program you're looking at is a completion program - and as such, you do not qualify. LPN would be a viable option. I started out as an LPN - and now I have a master's in nursing. Good luck to you. Hope we've been able to clarify things for you.
    Yes you guys have been all helpful. At least helped calm my nerves! My blood was boiling for a second! lol
  14. Visit  Stephalump} profile page
    1
    Quote from CallieNM

    Yes you guys have been all helpful. At least helped calm my nerves! My blood was boiling for a second! lol
    Yes, I think WellStar is the direction you want to go. I'm sorry you were led astray by heaven knows who, but all you can do is move forward!
    CallieNM likes this.
  15. Visit  gypsyd8} profile page
    1
    i think your confusion might be remedied by reading what i put in bold below. the college appears to offer two programs, a pre-licensure bsn and an accelerated program for someone with a bachelors degree in another field. you do not qualify for the latter, because you have an associates degree. does the college you received your associates at have an articulation agreement with this college? if so, that may mean you can avoid the lower division ge requirements. if not, look for a bsn program through a university. if your associates was from a community college you might be able to shave off a few lower division classes by virtue of your associates. in any case, i think you should seriously consider a bsn, instead of an lpn. it offers more career options, and meshes with your healthcare admin degree. hope this helps, where i come from all community colleges have articulation agreements with the state university system, which means that anyone with an associates pretty much automatically transfers as a junior, if they have taken the right classes. i don't know if its the same where you are.

    Quote from callienm
    bachelor of science in nursing (bsn)the wellstar college of health and human services offers a program of study in nursing leading to a bachelor of science in nursing (bsn) degree. this program is fully accredited by the commission on collegiate nursing education (ccne). in addition, this program leads to eligibility for initial licensure as a registered nurse and consists of a traditional curriculum plan and an accelerated option for students holding a bachelors degree in another field. a bsn completion option is also available for persons who are already registered nurses. all three program options combine nursing courses with general education courses. the general education courses provide a broad scope of liberal education for the nursing program and serve as a foundation for functioning in a civil society and learning nursing concepts. students may declare nursing as a major and begin taking the general education component of either program, at any time.
    the baccalaureate degree sequence for prelicensure students is offered as outlined in the curriculum guide. since there are a limited number of spaces in the program, prospective students must apply to the bsn program for admission with a cohort for each clinical sequence of the program."

    copied from the school's website i was thinking about checking on. from what i put into red i think i will be able to apply because it is prelicensure program. man, i think i am going to be sick. i feel like i have wasted so much time, resources, money... omg...
    CallieNM likes this.


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