Fastest Way to become an RN

  1. 0
    Here are some of my questions I need opinions and Former RN's to help with this:

    1) Is it easier to become a CNA then apply to Nursing school and try to get in?

    2) Is it easier to become an LPN then apply to a Nursing school and try to be accepted?

    3) Whats the most efficient and fast way of becoming a RN?

    I was thinking about going for my CNA in Jan. of 2008 and hopefully transfering to a nursing school in Fall of 2008. Or is it better to go and find a school for a 2 year degree in LPN or RN then becoming an RN? Any info would be deeply appreciated.
  2. Get our hottest student topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 40,276 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 16 Comments so far...

  5. 2
    Quote from tou860
    Here are some of my questions I need opinions and Former RN's to help with this:

    1) Is it easier to become a CNA then apply to Nursing school and try to get in?

    2) Is it easier to become an LPN then apply to a Nursing school and try to be accepted?

    3) Whats the most efficient and fast way of becoming a RN?

    I was thinking about going for my CNA in Jan. of 2008 and hopefully transfering to a nursing school in Fall of 2008. Or is it better to go and find a school for a 2 year degree in LPN or RN then becoming an RN? Any info would be deeply appreciated.

    To avoid long waits-- Go to a private school?
    I live in hawaii and while there is a waiting list (or just a lot of competition) to get in the nursing prgram at university of hawaii, the local private university (more expensive!), Hawaii Pacific University, has no such waiting list and accepts people if they have a 2.75 or higher. It's way more expensive, though.. But worth it to me since I can get it out of the way. They also do summer sessions at my school, so I hopefully can get my RN in 2.5-3 years, instead of 4. I duno how other private schools are. This one offers a lot of different scholarships that I am going to try to take advantage of.

    Also, why the heck go through all that? Just get your BSN.. Who knows, a BSN may be the requirement someday. Just get it and then if you ever want to move up in your career, all you need is the 2 years in a masters program!
    cooliegirl and tou860 like this.
  6. 1
    It completely depends on how the schools in your area work. Get online, look up all the schools in your area with nursing programs. Check each site carefully, and remember to check for partnership programs. Check community colleges, universities, technical and private schools. Also, check the local hospital websites under their benefits for employees. Some have partnerships with the local colleges to "grow their own nurses". Those organizations will usually pay for your nursing degree in exchange for a commitment to work for them for a specified time period. Banner Health is one organization that does this...check for a Banner Health facility in your area. Good luck.
    tou860 likes this.
  7. 0
    How much is it a year in University of Hawaii I live in CT so it is pretty far but the weather is so nice there
  8. 1
    Quote from tou860
    Here are some of my questions I need opinions and Former RN's to help with this:

    1) Is it easier to become a CNA then apply to Nursing school and try to get in?

    2) Is it easier to become an LPN then apply to a Nursing school and try to be accepted?

    3) Whats the most efficient and fast way of becoming a RN?

    I was thinking about going for my CNA in Jan. of 2008 and hopefully transfering to a nursing school in Fall of 2008. Or is it better to go and find a school for a 2 year degree in LPN or RN then becoming an RN? Any info would be deeply appreciated.
    A typical student who goes for a BSN in nursing will take 3.5-4 years.

    My situations is this, I am in a private university, no such things as a wait list, more expensive. I started in April of this year, 2007, and will be completed and ready for my NCLEX by June 2009. This includes ALL my pre reqs. Had I already had my pre reqs, I could complete our program in 18 months. I will have my ASN, associates of science in nursing, and be an RN, after I pass NCLEX. Now at that point I will be 2 years into schooling and be an RN. I will take my BSN classes online, as my school offers this as well, this will take 1 more year....and in 3 years time I will have my BSN in nursing. WAY Faster then traditional method. PLUS the last year I will be working and making money, and gaining experience while getting my BSN.


    Good luck in what you decide to do.
    tou860 likes this.
  9. 1
    In my opinion, it would be a waste of time to become a CNA, (unless you just want to work in the nursing arena). You still have to take your prerequisite classes, such as, English, Algebra, World history, Anatomy & Physiology, Microbiology etc...You have to complete these core classes with satisfactory grades before taking the NET or Nurse Entrance Test. None of the credits from a CNA program will transfer, but some credits from the LPN program does transfer, it depends on your school. Also an LPN is not a degree program, it is a licencse to practice nursing in your state, you receive a diploma or certificate. My advice is to aim for the top, become an RN.
    tou860 likes this.
  10. 1
    I can reply to this message on a more personal level. I graduated from a four year school Dec 2005. Couldn't get a job in my field to save my life. I first thought I wanted to be a teacher, but after even struggling with that decision, I decided to pursue nursing which is something I wanted to do while in school the first go around. Getting there was the problem. It was the middle of the Fall 2006 semester when I decided to got to nursing school. I couldn't apply for admission into a new school until Spring of 07. My crazy self decided that I could go to the community college, become a CNA (which is now a requirement before they'll even accept you into an ADN program) then start my pre reqs over the summer. I took general psyc over the summer since I got a D on it during my first degree and a D won't transfer. I'm now at this school that offers an Accelerated BSN program for those with a degree in a field other than nursing. The program will take 13 months to complete. Basically, if I were you and was planning on applying to an ADN program, I would become a CNA first, especially if it's a requirement. If you're planning on going to a four year school, I wouldn't worry about the NA certification because they'll certify you after a few semesters into the program. It does help to be a CNA because you'd have relevent experience. But if you don't want to waste the time to become certified, you could be a volunteer. I just started working as a CNA after being certified in March. I work at a teaching hospital which is cool. I just learned that they have a CNA program that allows you get certified in 2 WEEKS. The program I enrolled in at the community college took 2 MONTHS. As far as the whole LPN thing goes, I probably wouldn't even waste my time. I've been doing some research and from what I've read less and less hospitals are hiring LPN's but if you plan to work at maybe a prison, or a rest home then go for it.
    tou860 likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from nurz2be
    A typical student who goes for a BSN in nursing will take 3.5-4 years.

    My situations is this, I am in a private university, no such things as a wait list, more expensive. I started in April of this year, 2007, and will be completed and ready for my NCLEX by June 2009. This includes ALL my pre reqs. Had I already had my pre reqs, I could complete our program in 18 months. I will have my ASN, associates of science in nursing, and be an RN, after I pass NCLEX. Now at that point I will be 2 years into schooling and be an RN. I will take my BSN classes online, as my school offers this as well, this will take 1 more year....and in 3 years time I will have my BSN in nursing. WAY Faster then traditional method. PLUS the last year I will be working and making money, and gaining experience while getting my BSN.


    Good luck in what you decide to do.
    What's the name of the school you go to? and the average cost yearly?
  12. 1
    Quote from nurz2be
    A typical student who goes for a BSN in nursing will take 3.5-4 years.

    My situations is this, I am in a private university, no such things as a wait list, more expensive. I started in April of this year, 2007, and will be completed and ready for my NCLEX by June 2009. This includes ALL my pre reqs. Had I already had my pre reqs, I could complete our program in 18 months. I will have my ASN, associates of science in nursing, and be an RN, after I pass NCLEX. Now at that point I will be 2 years into schooling and be an RN. I will take my BSN classes online, as my school offers this as well, this will take 1 more year....and in 3 years time I will have my BSN in nursing. WAY Faster then traditional method. PLUS the last year I will be working and making money, and gaining experience while getting my BSN.


    Good luck in what you decide to do.
    Wow I really like that method....I wish that was available everywhere.
    GOODMED likes this.
  13. 0
    It really depends on the school you go to.

    I have heard others on the board state that their school requires you become a CNA first or give you extra points if you do.

    Others schools do not care, won't even ask that on the application so having it is just a big waste of time. They will not give you extra points or any advantage for doing it.

    So pick a school out and work on the requirments that the school you want to go to has.

    As far as a LPN it will not help you get into RN school. If you go that route you will have to take pre reqs for the LPN program, and then get accepted, and its tough to get into just like the RN programs. Then once in most take a year, and you will get a certificate. Then you will have to go back to CC and take more pre reqs and reapply to an RN bridge program, get accepted and do that before getting a degree, and sitting for the state exam. Its actually a much longer road.


Top