Low GPA and CRNA school...

  1. 0
    I'm looking for help and opinions on my situation. I would love to go to CRNA school but my BSN GPA is a 3.1(while in school, I had no plans on attending CRNA school). I've been an ICU nurse for 6 years.

    I think to be considered I'm going to need a strong GRE score, and I'm looking for other avenues to improve my chances. What about taking a couple of Graduate classes? Looking for all and any advance.

    Thanks in advace
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  3. 25 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I think taking some graduate level classes and doing very well in them will help. Ace the GRE. Consider CCRN and any other certifications you can get. If you are in a slower ICU or one without a high acuity, consider changing if possible. Most schools focus a lot on science type classes for your GPA. Consider some upperlevel chem or physics classes as a refresher, maybe not even at grad level. They will help you in school and raise your GPA. Be able to explain if asked in an interview why your GPA was low.

    Good luck!
  5. 1
    I agree with FLTraumaRN. In addition, the director for a local program told me that one of the BEST ways to make yourself a more competitive applicant is to do well in a graduate level science course (ie: pharmacology or advanced pathophysiology). They want to see you can succeed in graduate school.
    ICU, RN, BSN, B.S. likes this.
  6. 2
    These forums helped me when I applied, so I thought I'd share!

    My GPA wasn't that great either . My undergraduate classes were over 10 years ago, so of course we know how much maturity can sink in over that time! Especially working in critical care! So, in order to redeem myself, I took two graduate level classes, pathophysiology and statistics. Did very well, had a decent GRE, prayed a lot, and got accepted! Your experience and your total commitment is a major part. You have to be dedicated, it isn't easy. You literally give up your life for 28 months! They have to be sure you are willing. Your success in their program reflects their success in teaching you. So don't give up...I am proof that you can get accepted! Also, shadow a CRNA to make sure you want to do this. It also shows your schools that you actually studied what it means to become one, not just dreamed of it! My GPA in undergrad doesn't reflect totally on how I am succeeding in the program. I'm doing very well and that's why I think schools look at the total package versus just GPA. Hope this helps!
  7. 0
    How do you find a CRNA to shadow? Do you just call the hospital and ask? I'd really like some feedback on the process
  8. 1
    Quote from smartmouth
    How do you find a CRNA to shadow? Do you just call the hospital and ask? I'd really like some feedback on the process
    Hi...
    I asked some people that work in the Or for a CRNA full name then I sent her an email to inquire. She replied and was very delightful to help me. She has been a CRNA for over 25 years. She had me shaddow a new grad so I can talk to her about the program in general. Another person you can approach is the OR nurse manager.
    smartmouth likes this.
  9. 0
    That's really helpful! Thanks.
  10. 0
    Are you already an SRNA at a school? If so, can you give me any advice on what they look for in qualified applicants?
  11. 0
    My overall GPA is terrible
  12. 0
    Quote from SurfaceToAir
    I agree with FLTraumaRN. In addition, the director for a local program told me that one of the BEST ways to make yourself a more competitive applicant is to do well in a graduate level science course (ie: pharmacology or advanced pathophysiology). They want to see you can succeed in graduate school.
    Can you just pick up one class at the GRAD level without committing to a program/degree? Will school let you do that?


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