B.S. In Biochemistry

  1. 0
    Hello,

    this is more of a personal pre-CRNA interest CRNA more to explain my background and ask .. whats next?

    Right now I am a 20 year old student , and this June I will be graduating with a B.S. In Biochemistry/Cell Biology at UCSD with approximately a 3.0 (UC gpa), 3.4 Major GPA, and a transfer GPA from an LACC of 3.7 . Keep in mind that UCSD Is a very very competitive school, especially as a Biochemistry major. I had originally intended on going to medical school, but for a number of reasons I am starting to have doubts. Over the past few months I have been researching different options, I have always seen myself in a medical/clinical position in the future but to be honest I don't think med-school is for me. I have found that everyone at my University wants to go to med school, but for the wrong reasons, and slowly I find myself being influenced by them as well. In order to stop myself, I have thought long and hard about what I want in the future. I have had a number of surgeries and Nurses are the people that stuck with me. That being said, after much research and talking to anesthesiologists and medical school, I have come to the conclusion that CRNA school may be the better option for me, and I am still young since I finish my degree almost two years before people in the same age group.

    I have taken gen chem, ochem, chem lab, biochem, biochem lab, some ( but not all ) ochem lab, mamm physiology, calculus( engineering series - and differential equations), physics lab, Biochemical Nutrition, cell bio, mol bio and really the only thing im missing is anatomy because UCSD doesnt offer it ( strange, I know). will begin lab research on Alzheimers next quarter, along with 4 upper division science course and a part time job. I am used to having a large workload. That being said, Since I do so much, and have taken a years off of my undergraduate degree time, my GPA isn't on par with other biochem majors at my school that do the same amount of classes in 4/5 years rather than 3.

    Now, reaching the end of my graduate studies, Im researching whats next for me. Medicine is still my path, just medical school isn't. Whats next in terms of getting into a good CRNA school? can I do so with a Biochemistry degree rather than a BSN ? do I have to take a BSN accelerated program ?

    Tests: what kind of tests do I need to take / prepare for in the next year? What can I do to become a better candidate. Im really interested in the Biochemical research im doing, will it benefit me to have this behind me when applying to CRNA school? can I go to CRNA school directly from an undergraduate program? Are there any classes I should take first ?

    My question pretty much is where do I go from here? Im thinking about contacting a CRNA at VA medical center but I dont know if they will have the time of day for me.
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  4. 5 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    You need at least one of ICU experience as a registered nurse as a requirement to get accepted to any CRNA program. So you need to become a nurse first. I would also strongly suggest shadowing a CRNA to see if you would like the career- some programs even require it. I would research some programs in your area to see what their specific requirements are to apply it should be on their website.
  6. 0
    Just as limaRN said, you must first be a registered nurse before becoming a CRNA. The minimum requirement is one year as a critical care nurse in a high acuity ICU (the more exerpience, the better). So you would have to go into an accelerated BSN program, which I believe are about 1.5 years. You could do the AA (anesthesia assistant) program with your biochem degree. You would have to take the MCAT to get into the AA program.

    If CRNA is the route you want to take, you will have to take your GRE to get into grad school. Once a nurse in the ICU, some programs may require you to take your CCRN (critical care registered nurse) certification exam. Some CRNA schools are moving towards Doctorate programs. My program will be a Doctorate in 2 years. My best advice would be to shadow a CRNA. This will help you decide the path you really want to take.
  7. 0
    You must first get the nursing model shoved down your throat for years before you ever attempt to apply to anesthesia school. Obviously since you were considering medical school you don't mind giving up the next 8 years of your life- that's a good thing.

    From your background-which is stellar- I would also suggest you looking into AA. It sounds like you've spent a lot of time dealing with physicians in your undergrad an the medical model might come easier. Just another topic to ponder
  8. 0
    Quote from briannai
    Hello,

    this is more of a personal pre-CRNA interest CRNA more to explain my background and ask .. whats next?

    Right now I am a 20 year old student , and this June I will be graduating with a B.S. In Biochemistry/Cell Biology at UCSD with approximately a 3.0 (UC gpa), 3.4 Major GPA, and a transfer GPA from an LACC of 3.7 . Keep in mind that UCSD Is a very very competitive school, especially as a Biochemistry major. I had originally intended on going to medical school, but for a number of reasons I am starting to have doubts. Over the past few months I have been researching different options, I have always seen myself in a medical/clinical position in the future but to be honest I don't think med-school is for me. I have found that everyone at my University wants to go to med school, but for the wrong reasons, and slowly I find myself being influenced by them as well. In order to stop myself, I have thought long and hard about what I want in the future. I have had a number of surgeries and Nurses are the people that stuck with me. That being said, after much research and talking to anesthesiologists and medical school, I have come to the conclusion that CRNA school may be the better option for me, and I am still young since I finish my degree almost two years before people in the same age group.

    I have taken gen chem, ochem, chem lab, biochem, biochem lab, some ( but not all ) ochem lab, mamm physiology, calculus( engineering series - and differential equations), physics lab, Biochemical Nutrition, cell bio, mol bio and really the only thing im missing is anatomy because UCSD doesnt offer it ( strange, I know). will begin lab research on Alzheimers next quarter, along with 4 upper division science course and a part time job. I am used to having a large workload. That being said, Since I do so much, and have taken a years off of my undergraduate degree time, my GPA isn't on par with other biochem majors at my school that do the same amount of classes in 4/5 years rather than 3.

    Now, reaching the end of my graduate studies, Im researching whats next for me. Medicine is still my path, just medical school isn't. Whats next in terms of getting into a good CRNA school? can I do so with a Biochemistry degree rather than a BSN ? do I have to take a BSN accelerated program ?

    Tests: what kind of tests do I need to take / prepare for in the next year? What can I do to become a better candidate. Im really interested in the Biochemical research im doing, will it benefit me to have this behind me when applying to CRNA school? can I go to CRNA school directly from an undergraduate program? Are there any classes I should take first ?

    My question pretty much is where do I go from here? Im thinking about contacting a CRNA at VA medical center but I dont know if they will have the time of day for me.
    This is a good place to start.

    Become a CRNA

    Definitely shadow a CRNA to see if it is something you will like before you invest a lot of time, money, and effort into pursuing it. Starting from scratch you are looking at minimum 6-8 years by the time you start nursing school to actually becoming a CRNA.

    Also to add, not all CRNA programs require a BSN. So it is feasible for you to graduate with your BS do an associates program, get your ICU experience, and then go into school. However, the time it would take to get your ADN you could get your BSN through an accelerated program and that would give you more options as far as CRNA schools.
  9. 0
    There are CRNAs at UCSD Thornton and Hillcrest.... and at the VA. Google a phone number and set up a few days of shadowing.

    Look into an accelerated BSN and do everything you can to make yourself the best candidate to get hired into an ICU as a new grad. Extern, work as an aide, certifications, letters of rec, etc. Be your best and work hard. Do a couple/few years in ICU developing yourself into a critical care nurse who can handle anything that comes through the doors... and then put in your applications to CRNA schools.

    Oh, and keep your mouth shut about your goals. Sounds strange, I know, but you will not likely get hired into an ICU if they know you intend to "use" them to get into CRNA school. ICU nurses can get sick of precepting a constant merry-go-round of new nurses on their way to becoming a CRNA. Invest in the unit as much as they invest in you.


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