DPN/Nurse Practitioner vs. PA/Physician's Assistant DPN/Nurse Practitioner vs. PA/Physician's Assistant - pg.2 | allnurses

DPN/Nurse Practitioner vs. PA/Physician's Assistant - page 2

I've been getting conflicting information from advisors on the difference between being a DPN/Nurse Practitioner vs. being a PA. I've been told the only difference is PAs are trained in the medical... Read More

  1. Visit  SopranoKris profile page
    1
    Wow, never thought I'd see my old thread from 2012 resurrected!

    I posted this before I even started nursing school. As I've gone through school and now work in the hospital, I have had the chance to see both NPs & PAs in action. I definitely want to be an acute care NP. I love what they do in our ICUs. In my state, NPs & PAs both have the same "authority" as far as writing prescriptions and being supervised by a physician.

    I'm applying to a few programs for a Fall 2017 start. I'm looking to become dual FNP/ACNP certified as I would need both to work in the ER. If I wanted to solely do ICU, I would only need the ACNP. I like the idea of having dual certification so I have a wider variety of options when the time comes.
    LoneStar1908 likes this.
  2. Visit  ghillbert profile page
    3
    As an ACNP, I tell nurses deciding on their path to do PA - if only because it is possible to switch specialties merely by changing jobs. Rather than nursing, where you have to keep going back to school to get more degrees and certificates if you want to switch, for example, from adult to pediatric acute care. In practice, at least in my state, the work and responsibilities are identical between PAs and CRNPs.
    cocoa_puff, SopranoKris, and ICUman like this.
  3. Visit  SopranoKris profile page
    0
    Quote from ghillbert
    As an ACNP, I tell nurses deciding on their path to do PA - if only because it is possible to switch specialties merely by changing jobs. Rather than nursing, where you have to keep going back to school to get more degrees and certificates if you want to switch, for example, from adult to pediatric acute care. In practice, at least in my state, the work and responsibilities are identical between PAs and CRNPs.
    Unfortunately, there aren't any PA programs that are local enough for me to drive. Closest one is over 2 hours away. And, I would have to quit my job to attend PA school. I can't quit working to go to school, so my only avenue is the NP route. I'm definitely going for the dual DNP FNP/ACNP certification. That way, I don't have to go back to school later and I am not as limited to one field.
  4. Visit  juan de la cruz profile page
    3
    Another layer to ghillbert's comment is the tendency to prefer PA's in surgical specialties that involve OR assisting. There seems to be a higher acceptance of PA's over NP's in terms of OR skills and whether that's just perception or PA training actually provides it, I'm not sure. I am certain though that training in first assisting is either not offered or not strong in many NP programs. In California, NP's have to train as RNFA's to add that layer to their role whereas PA's seem to get hired in the role without the need for additional formal schooling. Having said that, as an ACNP whose role has been in adult critical care for the last 10 years, I haven't had to go back to school in order to remain competitive.
    ghillbert, SopranoKris, and cocoa_puff like this.

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