any new grads hired in PICU?

  1. HI any new grads get hired right outta school to PICU if so did you feel overwhelmed? or after orientation did u feel ready? and how long was your orientation?
    thanks:spin:
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  2. 23 Comments

  3. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    Hi, lynnzee33. I've moved your thred to the PICU forum because I think you'll get more attention here. There's another similar thread but it's a bit dated.
  4. by   canadian_girl75
    Hi Lynzee

    I am not uite a new grad I am 18 mo post grad who transferred to PICU from energ. There were uite a few new grads in my group though. I found the response on my unit to be quite different. Some felt it was wrong some didn't. As for me I never went to the floor post grad I went straight to a specialty area. From that experience I fell that no matter where you go if you have the confidence and the education to back you you will be fine.

    Try to seek out the nurses that encourage and support you and draw from them. Never be afraid to ask questions. There will be those ones who you will definately want to stay clear of but hopefully you can find those ones who are glad your there and are willing to help you through it.

    In my expereince I found that sometimes I found myself being more "on the ball" than some who have been around a lot longer. Not always the case but certainly happened.

    Our orientation was quite extensive. We had 3 months in classes with clinical days in between. The New grads are getting an additional 6mo buddied due to canadian gov't funding. Experienced RNs are getting 2wks buddied and 6 wks in the same room. There are tons of education supports. This is key I think. Its all about confidence and support

    Good luck
    cndngrl75
  5. by   googabin02
    Hi!! I am a totally new grad in the PICU. I love it there. It is really really stressful and at times overwhelming but it really is a great place. I would reccomend going to the PICU if you're sure thats what you really want to do. It requires a lot of you and you have to be extremely focused on your job. I am just completing my 20 week orientation this Saturday and I'll be on my own after that. Make sure the PICU you choose offers great teamwork because if it wasn't for that, I wouldn't have made it through. No one expects you to know everything but everyone expects you to ask if you aren't sure. I ask questions everyday about things that I am positive I know how to do but I'll just ask someone to double check to make sure it is correct. These children are so fragile and sick that one mistake could be it. Check, check, and check what you do. The PICU is a great learning experience and I highly reccomend going straight there after school if you're ready for a challenge!! Let me know if I can help you out anymore!!:spin:
  6. by   LyndseyER
    thanks i sent you a pm
  7. by   Sippy RN
    In my experience it is a bit more challenging for a new grad to work in PICU based on the higher acuity of the unit. I definitely would do some research on hospitals in your area. I personally think we need more PICU and NICU.. heck pediatric nurses out here. So kuddos to you!
  8. by   googabin02
    It sure is challenging but if you're up for the challenge, my hat is off to you. I think new grads also have things to offer in the PICU, or any unit for that matter. I don't know that starting at any other unit if the PICU is where you really want to be would help. I can see going to a Peds floor first, but sometimes you learn things the right way if you go right to the PICU. We do things differently from the floor and it's easier to learn things the way the PICU does it the first time then have to re-learn. Just my opinon!
  9. by   AlabamaBelle
    I went to PICU as a new grad. I had worked in the unit for the previous 8 years as a unit secretary, so I had a good idea of what awaited me.

    I still had a huge learning curve, but I love it. I had a 3 month long orientation to the unit. I felt extremely overwhelmed and sometimes out of my depth. But I kept on.

    I'm 3 years into PICU nursing and still love it. I am constantly learning new things and seeing new things - that is the challenge/joy of the PICU.

    We have just recently moved into a new building. With that move, we also "joined" with the CVICU pediatric nursing staff. This is quite the change and challenge for two similar yet vastly different types of nursing (the CV surgeons tend to not think the PICU RNs can adequately care for their patients).

    If PICU is really, really in your heart, go for it.
  10. by   angelilyRN
    I was hired directly to PICU out of school a year and a half ago. I wouldn't change that decision for anything!! We had about 3 months of combined classroom and precepted experiences. Do your research on the particular unit you're interested in. The people you'll be working with will make all the difference in your success. I was blessed with amazing coworkers who were willing to help me and teach me when I didn't understand why I was doing what I was doing. Some frown upon jumping into such a specialized field as a new grad, but if you know what you want to do, run with it! And plan on feeling overwhelmed and dumb at times - it comes with jumping into critical care right out of school. School isn't meant to prepare you to be a critical care nurse right out of the gate. The learning curve is really steep, but it should be, so plan on it. And enjoy it! You'll have amazing experiences and meet some incredible kids and families. And always value the family and work to build relationship and trust with them - they are huge in helping you care for your patients. Good luck!
  11. by   pcicurn7
    Look into a good program. There are many out there.

    I am 3/4 of the way done with mine, which was a one year orientation as a new grad. I did 3 months in an outpatient setting (peds ED), i did 3 months in an inpatient setting (cardiology floor), then i spend the last 6 months in the ICU. i dont count as staff at any point in time until i'm done with orientation. it is an excellent program, and if you are truly interested, look for the right opportunity for you. Make sure you are up to the task, the learning curve is quite steep. But, its do-able.

    Good luck.
  12. by   Ventjock
    Quote from irisRN
    Look into a good program. There are many out there.

    I am 3/4 of the way done with mine, which was a one year orientation as a new grad. I did 3 months in an outpatient setting (peds ED), i did 3 months in an inpatient setting (cardiology floor), then i spend the last 6 months in the ICU. i dont count as staff at any point in time until i'm done with orientation. it is an excellent program, and if you are truly interested, look for the right opportunity for you. Make sure you are up to the task, the learning curve is quite steep. But, its do-able.

    Good luck.
    where is this? you can pm me if you dont want to disclose the location.

    thanks
  13. by   pcicurn7
    i just PMd you, but i wanted to add...there are lots of hospitals that are doing this now, so its worth to look around. some places are finally realizing that its smart to invest in one year of training new grads, shaping them to what THEY need them to be, familiarizing them with the hospital system, etc. These programs tend to have a high retention rate.

    Whatever you wind up picking, just make sure that you have a long enough orientation. If you can, visit these hospitals and talk to those who have been through similar programs.
  14. by   stefaniePICURN
    I started as a new grad in the PICU almost a year ago. My orientation was 6 months long, give or take according to individual needs. We had pediatric nursing basic classes, as well as pediatric critical care classes for 2 months. We were on the unit with a preceptor for 5 months. We also had time spent in the simulation lab practicing codes and other situations, as well as attending inservices, and got certified for the Hyperbaric chamber. I was on orientation on day shift 3 months, then night shift 3 months (which is where i remain now). I had 2 different preceptors on each days and nights, which is nice because you see how each nurse does the same thing a different way so you can develop your own way of doing things. Every single opportunity I had to ask a question, I did. Even off orientation now, I still ask a million questions. On our unit, we are able to choose our patients at start of shift, so my preceptors were great in that they always sought out the best opportunities for me. Now that I am on my own, it is great to have such support on nights, and I feel as though I have 9 preceptors at once while working, seeing as I can ask anyone anything. Good luck in finding a supportive orientation program!!

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