Pediatric rating scales

  1. 0
    Hello everyone!
    I would like to talking about the pediatric rating scales used in our units.
    In my unit we use principally two scales:
    - Faces pain rating scale;
    - Conley scale (for falling risk), used for patients with more of 14 years old.

    I would like to know other rating scales to improve my job.
    Which scales used in your unit?!

    (I'm sorry for my bad english... )
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  3. 12 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    We use FLACC, faces and 1-10 scales for pain. We also do a falls risk assessment for all ages and an ESE assessment which is basically an entanglement risk
  5. 0
    We use NIPS , Flaccs, Faces and Numerical (based on the age/ mental status of the child) in the ER. I am not sure if they have a fall scale on our peds floor, but it makes me wonder now. I have to check it out.

    AeronurseNJ
  6. 0
    FLACC is definitely the pain scale of preference for younger children and older children who are developmentally delayed.
  7. 0
    Quote from brithoover
    We use FLACC, faces and 1-10 scales for pain. We also do a falls risk assessment for all ages and an ESE assessment which is basically an entanglement risk
    Entanglement? That sounds interesting! What do you do for a high score? I work ICU so don't have this problem too often but occasionally we get those movers who I'm worried are going to be strangled if their not watched 24/7
  8. 0
    Quote from umcRN

    Entanglement? That sounds interesting! What do you do for a high score? I work ICU so don't have this problem too often but occasionally we get those movers who I'm worried are going to be strangled if their not watched 24/7
    We assess based on age, activity, and have an iv or tube of any kind automatically scores them 2 points. Among other things. If they are high risk a patent must be with them at all times and we would check in on them more often
  9. 0
    Quote from brithoover
    We assess based on age, activity, and have an iv or tube of any kind automatically scores them 2 points. Among other things. If they are high risk a patent must be with them at all times and we would check in on them more often
    So a 13 month old with 5 continuous IV's, continuous g-tube feeds and continuous tele/sat monitoring would be pretty high risk haha stopped that kid from hanging himself a few times. Unfortunately we cannot mandate that a parent stays with a child 24/7, especially when the child has been in the hospital for 6 months.
  10. 0
    Quote from umcRN

    So a 13 month old with 5 continuous IV's, continuous g-tube feeds and continuous tele/sat monitoring would be pretty high risk haha stopped that kid from hanging himself a few times. Unfortunately we cannot mandate that a parent stays with a child 24/7, especially when the child has been in the hospital for 6 months.
    Lol yes that is about as high risk as they get. I'm not sure what they do in our ICU, I'm in oncology but all of our parents stay overnight. Our new AMLs are in the hospital for their first 6 months of treatment
  11. 0
    Entanglement assessments are standard protocol on our peds floors. About a dozen years ago one of our kids was accidentally strangled with IV tubing while an inpatient on one of the floors.

    Strangulation With Intravenous Tubing: A Previously Undescribed Adverse Advent in Children
    http://www.saskatoonhealthregion.ca/...trics-1063.pdf
  12. 0
    Yes I can definitely see the importance of it...interesting. I'm on my units practice council. Maybe something to be brought up.

    That's pretty impressive you can always guarantee a parent at the bedside! How do they manage their work/other children? We certinaly have our parents that never leave but sometimes they just have to spend a night away, even if only for their sanity. Just curious.


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