What is the job market like in OR?

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    Hello, I am looking to relocate to find work. The job market for nurses is dead in my area and I have not found a job. Oregon is one of the places I'm thinking about relocating to but I'm scared that I will move and I won't be able to find a job here as well. I don't have alot of experience so it makes it that much harder. I just wanted to get some advice about it from nurses who live in OR. Is is hard for new grads to find work here (I'm pretty much a new grad with only 6 months exp). Also, I'm an LPN, if that matters.
    lindarn likes this.
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  3. 16 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Where are you coming from?
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    The market is flooded here as well. Not much hospital work for LPNs, maybe long term care but even that is a long shot. There are 12 nursing programs in the Portland area, and even BSNs are having problems finding work... (for New Grads).
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    As stated above the market in Oregon is staturated. Hospitals have hirring freezes and one has started to lay off nurses. Then there are all the programs as wel
    I have been looking for 7 months and I all I been able to get is a new agency doing home health.
    One hospital I interviewed at had 40 spots they interviewed 546 people, most places I have interviewed at have 100 applicants for ever 1 spot.
    lindarn and CaLLaCoDe like this.
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    Lovemybugs- that is so discouraging.
  8. 1
    Quote from OregonBSN
    The market is flooded here as well. Not much hospital work for LPNs, maybe long term care but even that is a long shot. There are 12 nursing programs in the Portland area, and even BSNs are having problems finding work... (for New Grads).
    Interesting you should say that about BSNs. A friend of mine works in medical recruiting, a former PA himself, and he told me to get the BSN or face perpetual unemployment. Too many AA degreed people looking for work he said. Hospitals are upping the requirement to BSN level.
    lindarn likes this.
  9. 1
    Does it matter how/where you got your BSN, in your experience?

    I have a friend who is a BSN working in a local hospital. She graduated from a top-ranked BSN program a few years ago and got a (GREAT!) job immediately. She told me it was a good idea to fork out the extra dough for a top-ranked program because, in her opinion, it would be easier to get a hospital job with a diploma from X or Y university as opposed to Z programs....I'm taking her advice, but I've only heard her opinion about this particular question.
    lindarn likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from pdxmomazon
    Does it matter how/where you got your BSN, in your experience?

    I have a friend who is a BSN working in a local hospital. She graduated from a top-ranked BSN program a few years ago and got a (GREAT!) job immediately. She told me it was a good idea to fork out the extra dough for a top-ranked program because, in her opinion, it would be easier to get a hospital job with a diploma from X or Y university as opposed to Z programs....I'm taking her advice, but I've only heard her opinion about this particular question.
    Yes, it's about pedigree.
  11. 0
    Quote from pdxmomazon
    Does it matter how/where you got your BSN, in your experience?

    I have a friend who is a BSN working in a local hospital. She graduated from a top-ranked BSN program a few years ago and got a (GREAT!) job immediately. She told me it was a good idea to fork out the extra dough for a top-ranked program because, in her opinion, it would be easier to get a hospital job with a diploma from X or Y university as opposed to Z programs....I'm taking her advice, but I've only heard her opinion about this particular question.
    I'm not sure if it's the actual school that counts - assuming that it's accredited, of course - but rather the actual degree you're earning. Where I work (a 1200 bed teaching hospital in the Midwest), only BSNs are hired - no LPNs and very, very rarely associate-degree RNs. The hospital's 2 remaining LPNs are working towards at least an associate's degree, if not a BSN. All associate-degree RNs are encouraged to get their BSN w/hospital financial assistance.

    Given the current job market for RNs right now, I'd encourage anyone considering a nursing program to go for the BSN track only. Even then it's challenging to land that first job.
  12. 0
    Quote from pdxmomazon
    does it matter how/where you got your bsn, in your experience?

    i have a friend who is a bsn working in a local hospital. she graduated from a top-ranked bsn program a few years ago and got a (great!) job immediately. she told me it was a good idea to fork out the extra dough for a top-ranked program because, in her opinion, it would be easier to get a hospital job with a diploma from x or y university as opposed to z programs....i'm taking her advice, but i've only heard her opinion about this particular question.
    that is the key part, a few years ago places where hirring. i not so sure it matters for the school, but rather the degree. if you look at the pass rates some of the more expenssive school are not has high as some of the cc. go where you can get into for nursing school, you can then bridge rn-bsn later. it is true that most of the hospital systems oregon or at least the north west part are making a swtich to bsn required. i have friends who got in the legacy program they have 5 years to finish their bsn and providence states in their job adds that bsn will be a requirment by 2018....however when ever i have applied to their jobs, having a bsn is one of their pre-qualifying questions now


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