New Grad in OR?

  1. Do you ever see a new grad get hired strait into the OR? I am in nursing school, and very much feel that I will be one those nurses who if I get into a first job I hate, I will leave nursing forever. I am very interested in OR. I like the invasive aspect. And I am not crazy about dealing with abusive families and patients that happen on the floor. Is there anything I can do while in nursing school to better my chances of getting an OR position after I graduate?

    Thanks
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   CIRQL8
    I was hired straight into the OR from nursing school. It has been the best choice (next to marrying my wife) of my life. I love the OR. I love the one to one patient nurse ratio. I love having a sedated patient. I love the first 5-15 minutes when I meet the patient and their loved ones, establishing a rapport and letting them know that we will take very good care of them. I like the feeling that I get when I ease a patient's fear of the unknown. I like knowing (even if the surgeon doesn't know it) That My scrub and I are the ones responsible for a smooth flowing operation. We have all the necessary equip. and supplies, and when the surgeon doesn't know how (it DOES happen), we tell them how to use it. We are respected (for the most part) by the surgeons, anesthesiologists, and the CRNAs, and we get along just fine. The OR is a very laid back place. The Docs and nurses are familiar with each other. The formality is at a minimum. I do feel compelled to call most of the Surgeons and Anesthesiologists Dr. So-And-So, but most of the residents and I are on first name basis, as well as some of the attendings.

    I will stay in the OR until such time as I can get into the office with a surgeon that I like and respect, or until I continue on to become a nurse practitioner.

    I love the OR and I cannot say it enough.

    In my institution, the new OR nurse is not thrown in to the wolves. There is a 4-6 month gereral surgery orientation, followed by another 4-6 months specialty orientation. You are with a preceptor. You will become familiar with your policies and procedures and how to do you job before you are set out alone.

    Nurses that do not like the OR, or cannot grasp the concept of the OR usually find out before the first month is up. You cannot go wrong giving it a try.

    BUT - it is not always easy to get into the OR right out of school.

    I hope that i have been helpful without being too chatty. I am sure that there will be more and even better responses to follow!!

    Enjoy your carreer!!

    Dave
  4. by   suzanne4
    New grads are hired all of the time into the OR. Just make sure that you have a good orientation. Your OR orientation will be minimum of about 2 1/2 times your orientation for some of the other areas.

    Hope that this helps.
  5. by   orrnlori
    In our university hospital we hire nursing students to be PCT's and anesthesia techs in the OR. It't the best way I know of to get your foot in the door of the OR.
  6. by   Ferret
    Our hospital is trialling newgrad programmes that are 12 months in the perioperative areas.
  7. by   CIRQL8
    I just saw an article in the AORN journal that Minneapolis/St. Paul area has a program taylored for periop orientation geared towards nursing students and nurses going in to the OR w/ no prior OR experience. Sounds interesting.


    Also just found out that one of our local colleges is looking into starting such a program.
  8. by   christySN
    I will graduate on May 14 and have been offered a position in Perioperative Services. A large teaching hospital in St. Louis (more than 60 operating rooms)offers a Perioperative Services Nurse Internship Program for new grads. It includes 6 months of training rotating through all the services. Upon, completion of the program you choose the service you would like to work in (providing there is an opening in that service and they offer you a position). When I interviewed with the Director and Manager they emphasized this program is designed for new grads and would like to recruit more new grads into OR nursing. They seem to be looking for new grads who like the one-to-one patient focus, want to be part of a team, realize the role of the nurse as the patient advocate in the OR and an interest in the technology of the OR. Unlike the other areas of the hospital, you cannot work in the OR as a Graduate Nurse (GN). I must pass the NCLEX before I can start the internship. So I plan to take the NCLEX in June, take the month of July off (much needed after juggling nursing school, familiy obligations, and work for 2 1/2 years) then start the internship at the beginning of August. I am looking so forward to becoming an OR nurse!
  9. by   suzanne4
    Good luck to you and very wise choice......................I am sure that you will be quite happy there.


    And congratulations on graduating................ :hatparty:
  10. by   stevierae
    Quote from CIRQL8
    I We are respected (for the most part) by the surgeons, anesthesiologists, and the CRNAs, and we get along just fine. The OR is a very laid back place. The Docs and nurses are familiar with each other. The formality is at a minimum. I do feel compelled to call most of the Surgeons and Anesthesiologists Dr. So-And-So, but most of the residents and I are on first name basis, as well as some of the attendings.
    Isn't that just so true!! Dave said a mouthful here, and emphasized some of the best things about the OR: It is SO laid back. We are a team, and we trust each other. If there is any problem ever, it isn't betwwen the nurses and the docs--it's between the nurse/docs on one side (united) and our mutual enemy on the other side (management.) This is because management often has a different goal in mind than the nurses/docs do: we want to do optimal patient care; they want to save money.

    But that's a topic for another day, and a bridge you will cross soon enough! Docs I've worked with always say that OR nurses are "the cream of the crop" of hospital nursing (of course, they may tell the ER and ICU nurses the same thing, LOL!) but I don't think they do.

    Really, wherever I have worked we are like family. I hope you enjoy your experience, and remember this: there are many right ways to do things. If someone tries to insist that his or her way is the best way, or the only way, smile, thank them, store it in your head, and either discard or keep it as you learn other techniques . You will find that you may throw away 90% of what you are told, but that 10% that you keep that works for you is all that matters, as long as it results in optimal patient care.

    Best of luck to you!!
  11. by   Energizer Bunny
    I have been re-thinking my dream of becoming a CNM and thought maybe OR would be where I might like to be when I graduate in two years. This thread is egging me on! Thanks!
  12. by   suzanne4
    Quote from CNM2B
    I have been re-thinking my dream of becoming a CNM and thought maybe OR would be where I might like to be when I graduate in two years. This thread is egging me on! Thanks!
    Kim,,
    As the little kids say: "Just do it!" I promise that you will love it.
  13. by   Energizer Bunny
    My biggest concerns are standing for long periods of time and dealing with the surgeons big egos. Is it true that their egos are bigger than other dr's? How do you guys deal with standing? Are there any good websites that effectively describe what OR nursing is really like?
  14. by   suzanne4
    Sure there are some surgeons that have huge egos, but once they realize that you know your stuff and won't put up with their crap, they usually back down and you find yourself well respected.
    You do a lot of standing if you are the scrub, but not as much as the circulator. There are actual mats that you can purchase to stand on that make your legs more comfortable when you are going to be in the same position for a long time. I actually used to order up an extra sequential stocking machine and use it on my tech for very long cases................
    Cases can vary in length from under 15 minutes to some that I have been part of that have actually gone for over 24 hours on the same patient, of course with different crews coming and going...............
    Comfortable clogs help quite a bit, and I prefer Super Birkies, actually all that I will even consider using. Have had such great results with them.

    Hope that this helps....................

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