Do you put on sterile gloves? - page 2

I've been precepting with different nurses and notice that when they use Choraprep or Duraprep some will use sterile gloves and some will not. The nurses who don't use sterile gloves told me the... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from mikethern
    <<< And i'll always use sterile gloves for a prep. >>>

    Of course you will. So will I. The difference is that you don't realize that it is unnecessary.

    It's quite possible to give an opinion/disagreement without being personally insulting or rude, FYI.
    Last edit by Marie_LPN, RN on Jan 28, '07
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    In addition, regarding the sterile gloves for prep: i've seen people i've worked with go to get a pair of regular exam gloves out of the box on the wall, 10 more gloves tumble out and into the floor, and the person getting the gloves picking them right up off the floor and either putting them in their pocket or putting them right back in the box (yes i've spoke up abouot it, but who's to say it doesn't happen). At least with sealed sterile gloves, i have a better idea of where they were last then the exam gloves.
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    It's quite possible to give an opinion/disagreement without being personally insulting or rude, FYI.
    I agree, so let's stop this here.

    If anyone is attacked and/or insulted by another poster, please, instead of responding directly, ONLY report it, using the red triangle at the bottom left of the post. Let the staff take care of rude and inflammatory posts and members.

    Thank you.
  4. by   mikethern
    It doesn't make sense to wear sterile gloves during a prep if you don't wear a sterile gown. A circulator's forearm is dirtier than exam gloves.
    Last edit by mikethern on Jan 30, '07
  5. by   Bibagirl
    It doesn't make sense to use sterile gloves when using a dura prep.
    What makes better sense is that the nurse washes and dries his/her hands
    immediately before prepping!
  6. by   mcmike55
    For basic abd preps, I normally don't wear sterile gloves when using a Duraprep. Along the line of the old fashion sponge stick, hands off method.
    When doing extremities, such as hands for carpal tunnels, ankle fx's, etc, I definitly wear sterile gloves. I have to hold in the prepped area, and feel I have better control of the extremity.
    I'm also try to maintain awareness that any prep solution that run from unsterile to steirle. It can happen.

    mike
  7. by   mikethern
    Quote from mcmike55
    I'm also try to maintain awareness that any prep solution that run from unsterile to steirle. It can happen.
    What do you mean?
  8. by   TracyB,RN
    This is in response to switching blades....We've been getting some really crappy ones lately, so our docs are frequently switching blades to "stay sharp." One doc referred to our new blades as "hacksaws" & wants a fresh one after each time a blade is used. They really are that bad!
  9. by   ewattsjt
    i think that mike's statement is referring to the idea that skin knives are considered contaminated because it cut the skin. some surgeons use a “skin knife” and a “deep knife”. mike's point is that if the skin is contaminated for the knife to touch it, it would also contaminate your gloves by touching the skin as well as your sponges, bovie, etc...

    newer studies suggest that the skin knife vs. deep knife is unfounded. the infection rates stay approximately the same if changing knifes or not.
  10. by   crackerjack
    Quote from mikethern
    The issue is not with initial counts. The issue is with closing counts. If you can fit a lap sponge into a 5mm incision, then you should be performing magic in Las Vegas.
    Wild one for ya...I work with an RN who had a surgeon shove a ray down a 5mm lap port. When she saw what was going on she about messed her pants, naturally!! I don't recall what she said his purpose and rationale was, just that he got it out the same way he put it in. So even with a 'guaranteed no-open laproscopic case' you have the risk of dumb-arse moves like that. (not that there is any such thing as a 'guaranteed no-open laproscopic case')
  11. by   mikethern
    Quote from crackerjack
    Wild one for ya...I work with an RN who had a surgeon shove a ray down a 5mm lap port. When she saw what was going on she about messed her pants, naturally!! I don't recall what she said his purpose and rationale was, just that he got it out the same way he put it in. So even with a 'guaranteed no-open laproscopic case' you have the risk of dumb-arse moves like that. (not that there is any such thing as a 'guaranteed no-open laproscopic case')
    It makes total sense to count instruments and other before a laparoscopy since you might open.

    You shouldn't have to count at the end of a say a percutaneous pinning for example.
  12. by   jenni2
    Nothing is ever going to be 100% sterile, you can autoclave instruments and as soon as that flash door is opened and the outside air is introduced they are "contaminated", the same goes with skin, you can not sterilize skin but you can try your best not to willingly add more microbes to the skins surface.
  13. by   heather2084
    i think sterile gloves are a great idea for cholraprep or anything of the like. that way in case you need to hold something, or move something out of the way while prepping, you can do so

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