Pay rates...RN to BSN

  1. 0
    I haven't heard anything, but is there a difference in pay rates from RN to an RN;BSN??? I understand that different specialities will give a pay raise and all, but if you do on to further your education, shouldn't there be a difference????
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  4. 0
    I haven't seen many places that give a pay increase for BSN...except for VA hospitals. Not every place pays according to specialty either. The premise is "equal pay for equal work"
  5. 0
    Some hospitals do some hospitals don't. The corporation I'm with (ohio health) does not. I do feel that specialty areas, or more education should be rewarded with pay, but alas it is not so.
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    As the posters above said, most places have a pay scale that is the same for everybody doing the same job -- regardless of their qualifications. Their belief is that if you do the same job, you deserve the same pay.

    However, the BSN may qualify you for additional jobs that will pay more and/or have better working conditions. It will give you more job options -- some of which may appeal to you and make the BSN investment financially worthwhile as well as personally satisfying.

    llg
  7. 0
    Quote from Debbie_LPN
    I haven't heard anything, but is there a difference in pay rates from RN to an RN;BSN??? I understand that different specialities will give a pay raise and all, but if you do on to further your education, shouldn't there be a difference????

    I know where I work, it doesn't matter what specialty you work, the pay is the same. When going from RN to BSN, the goal, usually is management. There is not much difference in pay, when you get your BSN. You have to consider the time and cost you put in to get that degree.

    But it definitely opens more doors for management and education position.
  8. 0
    We have two hospitals, one pays 75 cents and the other pays a dollar for having your BSN as a staff nurse. (with further opportunity for advancement after experience catches up)

    Certificates (ACLS, MED-SURG, PALS, etc) pay 25 cents and 50 cents per hour at each hospital with a cap of claiming two for pay.
  9. 0
    Talked to two facilities, one paid for BSN and one did not. One that paid for BSN has more openings than one that did not pay.
  10. 0
    Quote from llg
    However, the BSN may qualify you for additional jobs that will pay more and/or have better working conditions. It will give you more job options -- some of which may appeal to you and make the BSN investment financially worthwhile as well as personally satisfying.

    llg
    My best friend has an ADN, and was working as a staff nurse for 6 months in a Cleveland hospital when she applied for a head nurse trainee position. She worked with some BSN RNs and the hospital gave the trainee position to her (now she realizes, she was the only one to apply). She was just 1 year out of school. So, it just goes to show you, that's not the case. She told me it's because (now, she realizes) no one wanted the longer hours, always being on call, staff calling at anytime of the night or day, for direction, etc., etc.. She makes Xlnt money ($80K) but who's got the time to spend it? She often works her vaccation time and has to just take the extra pay. No satisfaction there! She said, when she worked as a floor nurse (wether you are diploma, ADN, BSN,), the hospital started her at $50k. She also said, if she knew what this job would be like, she would have just stayed a floor nurse. She would have had more job satisfaction, because she would have more time to herself! But, she can't un-ring that bell now. Her husband is a CPA, and she would still be living large in NE-OH. This was her advice to me, when I decided to go back to school. "Just go for the diploma, the pay's the same." Although, I'm going for the ADN because the diploma school is 30 miles from me, and in the Ghetto.
  11. 0
    Quote from CateRavenwing
    My best friend has an ADN, and was working as a staff nurse for 6 months in a Cleveland hospital when she applied for a head nurse trainee position. She worked with some BSN RNs and the hospital gave the trainee position to her (now she realizes, she was the only one to apply). She was just 1 year out of school. So, it just goes to show you, that's not the case. She told me it's because (now, she realizes) no one wanted the longer hours, always being on call, staff calling at anytime of the night or day, for direction, etc., etc.. .
    The fact that your friend was foolish enough to take (and keep) a lousy job she doesn't like doesn't really prove anything about the benefits and/or disadvantages of higher education. As you yourself said, she may have gotten the job only because no one else wanted it.

    In fact, it could be used as an example of the opposite point. If your friend had a higher level of education, she would have more job options available to her -- and could perhaps find a job that both paid well AND was personally satisfying. As it is, without that education, she feels "trapped" in a job she hates.

    I wish her -- and you -- the best of luck in the future.

    llg
  12. 0
    Quote from llg
    The fact that your friend was foolish enough to take (and keep) a lousy job she doesn't like doesn't really prove anything about the benefits and/or disadvantages of higher education. As you yourself said, she may have gotten the job only because no one else wanted it.

    In fact, it could be used as an example of the opposite point. If your friend had a higher level of education, she would have more job options available to her -- and could perhaps find a job that both paid well AND was personally satisfying. As it is, without that education, she feels "trapped" in a job she hates.

    llg
    (Sigh!) I never said she felt trapped, I said that she can't un-ring that bell. Meaning, she can't go back to being a staff nurse when she's been in managment. With her experiance, she can go anywhere pretty much. She can even get certification with just an ASN (through Francis Payne Bolton/Case Western Reserve University). Just not back to being a staff nurse. Also, I think I know what I'm talking about. Half my family members are Dr's and Nurses. Another friend of mine got her practitioners degree 3 years ago, because the opportunities were the same for the ASN's as for her when she just had her BSN.
    Last edit by Nurse Ratched on Dec 31, '05


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