Why a C-Section? - page 4

Hi everyone, I was just wondering why so many women are choosing to undergo ceasarean delivery without even a trial of labor? Don't they realize it is a major abdominal surgery and they will be in... Read More

  1. by   Gompers
    I must be crazy. My idea of the perfect birth is laboring in a jacuzzi until it's time to push, and then using my pain as motivation to push the kid out ASAP. (Heck, it's exactly how I "delivered" my last kidney stone!) A tad unrealistic, maybe. But I'm a true Pisces and I'm never as relaxed as I am in the water. A hot bath does something magical to me, it's like a cure-all for anything that ails me.

    I just can't imagine WANTING to go through major abdominal surgery.



    Then again, I might think this way because of one little tiny thing...



    ...epidurals absolutely scare the bejesus out of me.
  2. by   mstigerlily
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Some I would rather not get into too much detail on here, like the loss of a uterus, severe peritonitis due to light nicking of a bowel , or women going home with a leg bag due to nicked and infected bladder. These things can happen at the hands of a very skilled and experienced surgeon, as I have seen them. Yep, these things do happen.

    deb
    Must agree. OK, I've only been in postpartum for almost a year now but the recovery is infinitely easier for vaginal deliveries, handsdown. As far as complications, we've readmitted quite a few people. Vaginal deliveries are almost always for hemorrhage but c-sections have become septic from the incision, nicked bladder (with leg bag as you said), ruptured uterus/bladder and yes, also hemorrhage. So it seems the complications are worse too.

    One huge benefit I can see from c-section (aside from healthy baby and quick delivery) is if you want to get a tubal ligation at the same time

    Melissa
  3. by   wannabeL&D73
    Having experienced both, for me personally the c-section recovery was significantly more painful. Immediately afterwards I was shaking for what seemed like several hours, and there was some sort of ridiculous delay in getting adequate pain control. I am extremely thankful that c-sections exist for emergencies, and with my son the OB clearly made the right choice to section. But I am even more grateful to the dr. who delivered my daughter and was patient and supportive throughout the 3 1/2 hrs. of pushing, who did *not* pressure me to agree to a c-section. My daughter's birth is one of my most treasured memories, and I am certain that with a different OB I would have ended up in the OR. In a future pg. I will do an elective c-section, the risk of uterine rupture scares me too much to try a VBAC.

    I think it is all about informed, educated choice. And a c-section for convenience or vanity is just absurd.

    Shannon
  4. by   mstigerlily
    Quote from edj02
    Also...I don't know what it is, but the energy and the atmosphere in the delivery room of a vaginal delivery simply cannot be replicated in the OR, or in the recovery room of the OR. If you have not felt that same energy, than I can see why maybe a nice convenient c/s seems desirable. You will be missing out on an experience you can never get back though.
    Thanks!
    I think this is a very sore subject with women who have delivered via a csection because of course they don't want to feel, in any way, that they are missing out on anything. But that said, I agree with your statement above. I think the reason they do feel like they missed out on something is because they did. In my mind, when I hear that a women delivered a baby via csection I think, "Dr. X delivered that baby, not the mother" because that is the truth. In a vaginal delivery, the mother (and her uterus) pushes that baby out and she is empowered by this feeling of accomplishment and contribution to the process of birth. For the duration of labor, the focus is on the mother and how she is progressing, if she is ready and encouraging her to push, breathe, etc. In a csection birth, the focus switches to the end product - getting the baby out and the mother becomes a passive partner in this process.

    That said, of COURSE a csection is vastly preferably to a poor outcome or a sick or dead baby. I am glad csections are available for those that need them.
  5. by   mstigerlily
    Quote from Gompers
    Then again, I might think this way because of one little tiny thing......epidurals absolutely scare the bejesus out of me.
    OMG me too. When I say that, people look at me like I'm mad. I had my first two smaller babies totally natural but when I got around to my son (9 pounder) I caved in and asked for the epidural. Sure, it took the pain away but the room got dark and my BP dropped and I felt like I was dying. I could barely move my arms and legs, it was so scary. When the anesthesiologist came back to give me a bolus, I said, "No thanks!" and let it wear off!
  6. by   mstigerlily
    I am sure this varies widely due to different hospital's protocols. Our standards of care and order sets for csections say catheters stay in for 18 hrs, up (at least at bedside within 12 hrs), progress to regular diet as tolerated (but some doctors specify only when bowel sounds or flatus is present). Our spinal orders generally specify no PO meds for first 18-24 hrs.

    I can tell you the acuity for fresh csections is higher and the charge nurses take that into account when making patient assignments. The CNAs don't like it because they have to do frequent vital signs (q30 min then q1h for the first 4 hrs I believe). Sometimes they just sleep, whicih is actually easier since I just pop in to check on them until it's time to get them up, but sometimes they are miserable, itchy, nauseous and hurting

    Glad your baby had no feeding issues, generally the big full term babies are good feeders in general. The only trouble they have is the typical csection spittiness which sometimes interferes with feeding as nobody likes to eat when they are gagging, babies included!

    Quote from TweetiePieRN
    Shoot, maybe i was one of the lucky ones! My urinary catheter was only in for about 8 hrs and they had me walking around after they pulled it out. I was having nausea, but no vomiting, no gas pains. Was able to progress to a reg diet after I "passed gas" which was about a day after surgery. The only pain I was having were those afterpains...I requested a heating pad for my back. I barely got any IV Narcotic. I was using their Vicodin.

    Our baby was very healthy apgars were 9 and 9. He was (and is) definitely not a poor feeder! He's a little chunker!

    I was only in the hospital less than 3 days. Admitted around 2 pm on Friday, went home Monday around 10am. The only complication I ended up with...the incision dehisced about 2 inches thanks to my dog jumping up on me as I got home from the hospital ...Also ended up with PPD...but that could happen to anyone, not just c/s.
  7. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from mstigerlily
    I think this is a very sore subject with women who have delivered via a csection because of course they don't want to feel, in any way, that they are missing out on anything. But that said, I agree with your statement above. I think the reason they do feel like they missed out on something is because they did. In my mind, when I hear that a women delivered a baby via csection I think, "Dr. X delivered that baby, not the mother" because that is the truth. In a vaginal delivery, the mother (and her uterus) pushes that baby out and she is empowered by this feeling of accomplishment and contribution to the process of birth. For the duration of labor, the focus is on the mother and how she is progressing, if she is ready and encouraging her to push, breathe, etc. In a csection birth, the focus switches to the end product - getting the baby out and the mother becomes a passive partner in this process.

    That said, of COURSE a csection is vastly preferably to a poor outcome or a sick or dead baby. I am glad csections are available for those that need them.
    Again, maybe my c-section experience is in the minority! Because I truly and honestly don't feel like I missed out on any of the excitement/emotional aspects of the birth. I was on cloud 9!! It was the most exciting day of my entire life!! :hatparty: I don't feel like less of a woman/mother. I feel so lucky to be able to even get pregnant and carry a child in my womb and bring life into the world. There are women in this world who can't do that and pay tons of money to get pregnant or to adopt. I don't define myself by how my child was brought into the world and I don't think others should either. Some things are definitely out of one's hands.

    I'm sure that women who are coerced into a c-section, or ones who were really gung-ho to have a vaginal must feel like they really missed out on something. I think the main reason why I never had that negative outlook on it, was because I left all the choices up to God.

    My baby was breech for awhile towards the end of the pregnancy. I was told then I may need a c/s, but I refused to schedule it with the doc and refused to have a version performed. I didn't want to "screw with nature or tempt fate". Then the little guy turned when I was about 38 weeks. So I was thinking "Ok vaginal birth". Then as I became overdue and then later learned that the little guy was stressed...that also (to me) felt like God intervening and that is why I felt comfortable consenting to the c/s. I knew that the outcome was not going to be good If I tried to labor.

    That being said, I do think women who have elective c-sections (just because someone doesn't WANT to have a vaginal and they have no real medical reason or risks to having vaginal birth) need to really consider the risks and the recovery too.
  8. by   KarryRN
    I've had three kids all vaginal and all non-medicated. Epidurals scare the crap out of me, and I liked being able to feel my legs even if I felt all the pain as well. I was able to walk to the bathroom immediately following birth. I felt great after, and was able to bond with my babies right away. I just don't understand the need to have a c-section for a first baby without even trying labor. Help me to understand.
  9. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from KarryRN
    I've had three kids all vaginal and all non-medicated. Epidurals scare the crap out of me, and I liked being able to feel my legs even if I felt all the pain as well. I was able to walk to the bathroom immediately following birth. I felt great after, and was able to bond with my babies right away. I just don't understand the need to have a c-section for a first baby without even trying labor. Help me to understand.
    Karry, In my instance I had my first baby in July this yr via C-section. There was no point to letting me try labor since I was determined to have a very small pelvic outlet and my baby was also under alot stress, his amniotic fluid was also low.
  10. by   edj02
    Isn't parenting supposed to be all about making sacrifices? If you are not willing to even sacrifice your vagina's elasticity for your child, what does that say about you?
  11. by   mstigerlily
    Well I think that's a little harsh. I know some women that have incontinence afterward, also loss of sensation from tearing and need A&P repairs so this is a valid fear.

    I had a small episiotomy with my first which I didn't need, I was numb down there for months and had stress incontinence for a few months which thankfully resolved. With my second and third, I had a small tear and didn't tear at all and both healed easily and quickly with no loss of sensation. I believe that a lot of the complications from vaginal births are due to very long labors, long pushing stage, vacuum and forceps use, inductions on non-ripe cervixes and boluses on the epidurals during pushing stage (which leads long labors, ineffective pushing, prolonged 2nd stage and vacuums).

    Quote from edj02
    Isn't parenting supposed to be all about making sacrifices? If you are not willing to even sacrifice your vagina's elasticity for your child, what does that say about you?
    Last edit by mstigerlily on Nov 1, '05
  12. by   live4today
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I think we in the USA have a rather cavalier way of looking at csection birth. Look at Britney Spears, had a csection due to "fear of childbirth". Did NO ONE even ATTEMPT to educate her? Of course not, she is a American pop princess and demanded and got what she wanted.

    I think it's a shame it (csection delivery) is being lumped in there with elective surgeries and the like---- maybe because of its inherent risks, not only to mom, but her baby. There are TWO patients involved, here, not just one. I would rue the day when csection on demand becomes the standard of care here in the USA; sadly, I see it coming in my lifetime. Too bad, if you ask me. It's just another indicator of our self-centered desire to have what we want when we want---now.

    I agree w/Altalorraine. Make THEM pay out of pocket for elective surgeries that have no medical necessity, including elective primary csection.
    I agree with you Deb. I am surprised to learn that "elective c-sections" are permitted today. How long has this been going on? My my my!!! Are other countries practicing this "elective" surgery for moms who do not wish to labor? Oh well....as long as those choosing the elective route pay for it out of their own pocket.
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Do not quote me, but I believe in Brazil, among the those with any real means or well-to-do, elective csection rates exceed 85%. I read that statistic someplace, but like I said, do not quote me. Even if it were only 50-60% that is ridiculous to me. Very indicative of our trends, which do concern me greatly.

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