what do lpns get to do in L&d?

  1. i want to become a nurse and work in labor and delivery but i was wondering what all do lpns get to do in l&d? i would like to be involved as much as possible. i have 2 children and i am a single mom so i was thinking about becoming a lpn couse school isnt as long but if i cant do everything that my heart is set on then i will go ahead and become a rn. any info???thanks in advance!!!!
    sheila
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Our maternity LPNs are mainly working in mother/baby. If an RN is extremely busy, they might assign an LPN with her in L and D to help out.
  4. by   fallinangel
    well thats still cool to me, i dont know why but i have this dream to work in l&d or mother baby. i think i would love it no matter what i am doing. thanks so much for replying to my post!
    sheila
  5. by   BETSRN
    Quote from fallinangel
    i want to become a nurse and work in labor and delivery but i was wondering what all do lpns get to do in l&d? i would like to be involved as much as possible. i have 2 children and i am a single mom so i was thinking about becoming a lpn couse school isnt as long but if i cant do everything that my heart is set on then i will go ahead and become a rn. any info???thanks in advance!!!!
    sheila
    Most hospitals do NOT use LPN's at all in L&D. That's critical care. many do not use them at all.

    My advice to you (if you wnat to do L&D), spend the extra time and go for your RN. That way, you are not limiting your possibilities. depending on where you live, LPN's are pretty restricted as to what they can do and how they can function. Many hospitals (like mine) have become all RN facilities. LPN's either had to go back to school (hopsital paying the bill) or become CNA's.

    If you are just starting out, go all the way. Then you'll really have a lot of opportunity when you graduate.
  6. by   Zhlake
    Our unit uses LPNs in labor. They are the "second person" for the delivery and assist with delivery and then take care of mom afterwards. The RN that had the mom in labor then takes the baby after delivery.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    nothing where I work. We don't use LPN's in labor/delivery at all. Just for PP patients/couplets.
  8. by   BRANDY LPN
    I have worked in two hospitals in L/D, in the first one I worked in the triage/exam rooms, I scrubbed for c/s, and I took care of the babies immediately after delivery.

    In the second one I did everything from admission to discharge except for consious sedation, mag, and blood. (I was allowed to DO mag and blood, but wasn't comfortable doing it)

    My experience is VERY rare and hard to find, my advice is to get your RN that way you will have many more options, and it really isn't that much more time. I always say I am gonna go back to school, but I never seem to be able to get it done.
  9. by   fallinangel
    well looks like im going all the way!!! i realy dont want to be limited to (cleaning up the mess) so if i go full time to be an rn how long do you think it will take? i am realy interested in doing this! also how was your first delivery experience? scary? im just realy scared of messing up. but i knkow alot about ttc being pregnant and labor and delivery...i did to much research when i was pregnant!! thanks so much !!
    sheila
  10. by   BETSRN
    Quote from fallinangel
    well looks like im going all the way!!! i realy dont want to be limited to (cleaning up the mess) so if i go full time to be an rn how long do you think it will take? i am realy interested in doing this! also how was your first delivery experience? scary? im just realy scared of messing up. but i knkow alot about ttc being pregnant and labor and delivery...i did to much research when i was pregnant!! thanks so much !!
    sheila
    Even we RN's "clean up the mess" all the time. Don't think that cleaning is relegated only to the housekeeping staff!

    The time it will take you depends on the length of the RN program you attend. Many L&D units will not take you without prior nursing experience (there's a reason for that) and so plan on working on a medical or surgical floor to get some experience in nursing in general.

    Don't worry about "messing up" as you put it. Just worry about getting through nursing school first. Skills will come later. Good luck!
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from BETSRN
    Even we RN's "clean up the mess" all the time. Don't think that cleaning is relegated only to the housekeeping staff!

    The time it will take you depends on the length of the RN program you attend. Many L&D units will not take you without prior nursing experience (there's a reason for that) and so plan on working on a medical or surgical floor to get some experience in nursing in general.

    Don't worry about "messing up" as you put it. Just worry about getting through nursing school first. Skills will come later. Good luck!
    precisely. You will find in most OB units, we nurses clean up everything after the delivery, and also make all our own beds, etc. LPNs are not for that purpose, at all. If used on my floor, LPNs care for couplets, only. They take vitals, give meds (except IV PUSH) and the like. They are NEVER used to "clean up" after RN's or do "scut work". We ALL get that pleasure!
  12. by   RNKitty
    I've been and L&D nurse for 8 years in 7 different hospitals. Only one used LPN's anywhere near L&D, and that was to recover vaginal deliveries. Most have phased our LPN's in L&D, even if they had been allowed years before. If you want to do active labor support without the litigation to get a taste for it, try being a doula. DONA (doulas of North America) have strict criteria for the role of doulas. To be a L&D nurse, you are looking at 3-4 years of school for your RN degree, then in most (not all) hospitals you need 1-2 years of basic nursing experience. Some get it in med/surg, some get it in postpartum. Then you can train to L&D. Even if they are willing to train to L&D, it will be 6-12 months of full-time work before you really have enough experience to function well independantly. If you do get on a L&D unit, don't accept a 3-6 week orientation. Insist on at least 3 months of a preceptorship. Good luck! It is a huge time commitment when you have young children.
  13. by   fallinangel
    its weird you mention doulas i origionaly wanted to be a doula but i have nevr even heard of one around here. i wish hospitals hired doulas! actualy they might i dont know but we have only 1 litttle hospital here maybe i should call the hospital and ask a few questions. i would also be interested in working in the nursery what do you have to be to do that? sorry about all the questions!
  14. by   RNKitty
    The Danbury Hospital in Danbury, CT, hires and trains doulas. They have the only program in the nation that I have ever heard about. The doula's get $250 per birth, but they have to come when called and stay until the birth - sometimes 20 hours or more. A hard work schedule when you have kids. Most people privately hire the doulas. LPN's do work in the nursery most places. Some places even use CNA's in the nursery, but that is more rare.

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