Holding up the legs during delivery

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    We have had 3 nurses injured in their shoulders and neck because of having to hold up and push back the womans legs during delivery. It is partially a request of the physician and partially that they have become so used to doing it that it is automatic whenever the pushing is ineffective or protracted. Does anyone know of any equipment that could be purchased for this or any other techniques? Thanks, B Fusco RN
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    Are there not foot pedals and/or stirrups on your labor beds? I have seen something advertised that slip onto the feet so Mom can pull on them, basically the same idea of holding the legs up. It was invented by an OBGYN. I can't remember what they are called though. Personally, I think helping Mom hold her legs back is more effective than stirrups, but know that it can be a work out.

    Which is why I always take advantage of any family members in the room and make them do it. :chuckle
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    Quote from bfusco
    We have had 3 nurses injured in their shoulders and neck because of having to hold up and push back the womans legs during delivery. It is partially a request of the physician and partially that they have become so used to doing it that it is automatic whenever the pushing is ineffective or protracted. Does anyone know of any equipment that could be purchased for this or any other techniques? Thanks, B Fusco RN
    I use the hand pedals as feet pedals during the early stages of pushing. I also get the significant other and whoever else is in the room to help mom hold her legs back. Sometimes I put one of the moms feet on my chest if there is just the dad in the room.
    I've also used the birthing bar for foot support. Our footpedals are not the greatest for the feet, especially if the patient has a heavy epidural.
    The most effective? Not really sure, because everyone is different.

    Also, try and push the patient on her side; only one leg need be supported...
    When its time for the birth, I am on the patients side, on a stool, holding her leg and in a good position to do suprapubic pressure or hand over the catheter for suctioning or whatever else I may need to do...
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    I'm new to this environment, and just trying to learn...

    Why do the woman's legs need to be held up? Is it because they have an epidural?

    If the mom doesn't, then maybe you could utilize the squat bar. Even if the physician doesn't want to actually catch the baby when the mom is in a squat position, you could use the squat bar for bringing the baby down. Hands and knees (with the head higher than the lower back) is also good for this. We often have mama on the bed, pushing in the hands and knees position, with her upper body resting on a smaller birth ball. Sidelying is great, too.

    Hmm, with an epidural, I guess I don't know, I'm not really experienced with that. I wonder, are your hospital beds older? If so, maybe call the company and ask if the foot pedals/hand grips have been updated in regards to their contruction and positioning. Explain what's been going on with your nurses and ask if they have altered their beds' contruction in response to the fact that more women are having epidurals, altering their ability to position their own legs. Maybe search on-line to see what other brands of beds are available. Surely this phenomenon isn't isolated to your hospital; with the medical supply industry being so large, I can't believe some company hasn't come up with some answer to this. As for the beds being expensive, I am sure they are. But so are workman's comp claims.

    Just a thought. I'm interested to hear other suggestions and what other nurses do.

    Lori
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    I'm a hands on person and prefer human contact to any equipment I've ever seen. Family members are great at saving the nurse's back. And good body mechanics is important. Remind the patient not to push against the person holding her legs.
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    McRobert's . . .. that is why.

    Had a very strong woman a few weeks ago, one RN on each leg, just about knocked up over.

    steph
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    Quote from NurseNora
    I'm a hands on person and prefer human contact to any equipment I've ever seen. Family members are great at saving the nurse's back. And good body mechanics is important. Remind the patient not to push against the person holding her legs.
    We did remind the patient but sometimes in the midst of everything they just let go and push with their legs.

    steph
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    Hmm I am glad I had mine natural and could hold my own legs up during the birth of my kids.

    renerian
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    Quote from bfusco
    We have had 3 nurses injured in their shoulders and neck because of having to hold up and push back the womans legs during delivery. It is partially a request of the physician and partially that they have become so used to doing it that it is automatic whenever the pushing is ineffective or protracted. Does anyone know of any equipment that could be purchased for this or any other techniques? Thanks, B Fusco RN
    Use the footplates, the squat bar, or (as a last resort) the stirrups. The other option is to have the mom put her hands in back of her knees and pull her own legs back.

    How about using family members for this? We use the fathers/SO's all the time.
  13. 0
    Quote from renerian
    Hmm I am glad I had mine natural and could hold my own legs up during the birth of my kids.

    renerian

    What do you mean natural? No c section or no drugs?

    Z


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