Elective Primary C/S - page 7

On our unit, Primary Elective C/S have become pretty popular, for this main reason, "I don't want to go through the pain of labor". Now, with that said some of these young ladies insist on also... Read More

  1. by   Gompers
    Quote from inanna
    we have just started doing elective c/s in the past year or so at my hospital. we had a new doc to come in and i guess where he came from he routinely had done them. i must admit that i have mixed feelings about this subject. i can't blame anyone for not wanting to hurt. but c/s have risks too. it is major surgery. if i had been given the choice, i would have probably have chosen a c/s too. but, in 1996 i didn't have that choice. i also didn't have the choice to get an epidural. my hospital only did intrathecal, and i progressed too fast. i begged for a c/s, at the time. although, i did end up delivering vaginally with a 4th degree. not at all fun. if i had to go through it again, i would probably choose to labor, if i could have an epidural, that is, and it work!

    that's what i don't understand about this whole thing - there is pain with c-sections. it's major abdominal surgery and there is post-partum pain. it's just trading one pain for another, in my opinion. to me, avoiding pain doesn't seem to be a reason to choose surgery - it's going to hurt one way or another.
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Gompers
    That's what I don't understand about this whole thing - there IS pain with c-sections. It's major abdominal surgery and there is post-partum pain. It's just trading one pain for another, in my opinion. To me, avoiding pain doesn't seem to be a reason to choose surgery - it's going to hurt one way or another.
    Gompers dear, I hesitate to respond because I hate it when people tell their labor stories to pregnant women.

    But to answer just the question about pain - for me, post-partum cesarean pain was doable. It was different than labor pain. It could be medicated away. I was in control of it. Now I realize that I learned alot about muscles after my surgery, like I couldn't even clear my throat w/o using abd muscles and I was surprised by that. But I could take some meds and it would get better.

    For me, the three "natural" labors I went through to have my first three were more about having no control - the pain took me over - I didn't like that feeling. I would get through one uc pain and then knew another was coming and I could do nothing about it. And the pain is unlike any other - even the pain after a cesarean.

    I made jokes about my 4th pregnancy - getting an epidural at 2 cm. Having a cesarean. I ended up with an emergency cesarean . . . be careful what you wish for, right?

    There is a difference in the pain of labor and the pain of a cesarean . . .and the truth is there are woman who don't view it as I do and have had both and prefer a vaginal delivery.

    Everyone is different - some of the women I help during labor are simply naturals and amaze me. Some of the women who have had cesareans and are up and about so very soon amaze me.

    Having said the above - I still don't think we should be doing cesareans for no good reason.

    Now, don't take anything I said to heart - you will have your own experience and don't let anyone else take anything away from that.

    Best wishes - steph
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Dec 8, '06
  3. by   Daywalker
    I've had both babies by emergency C-section, and wish that the VBAC with baby #2 had worked. I prefered the labour (23 1/2 hrs and 30 hrs) to the post-op pain and blood loss. It's not like having major abdominal surgery doesn't hurt! I can't understand why women aren't better informed by the OB/GYN. I loved my epidurals, though.
  4. by   mommy2g1b
    I agree with you Gompers.
    I have had 2 c-sections and 2 vaginal deliveries (with only small amounts of nubain). I will take the pain of a natural labor over the pain and nastiness of an incision infection that takes weeks to heal (not to mention the hassle and nastiness of cleaning it....but we won't go there) or the makes-you-want-to-die spinal headache that lasts for hours and hours, or the clot that "pops" 3 days after surgery through the incision. I don't think women know that these things can happen. Many think it will be an easy thing, no major pain, no complications, etc. That just simply isn't true.
  5. by   Daywalker
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    Britney not only had an elective c-section, with both children she went in 6 weeks before her due date to avoid stretch marks...why is the American Medical Association not pulling licenses for this sort of thing?
    Ummm... 6 weeks early to avoid stretch marks? With that logic, I'd have had to give birth at 18 weeks gestation.
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from mommy2g1b
    I agree with you Gompers.
    I have had 2 c-sections and 2 vaginal deliveries (with only small amounts of nubain). I will take the pain of a natural labor over the pain and nastiness of an incision infection that takes weeks to heal (not to mention the hassle and nastiness of cleaning it....but we won't go there) or the makes-you-want-to-die spinal headache that lasts for hours and hours, or the clot that "pops" 3 days after surgery through the incision. I don't think women know that these things can happen. Many think it will be an easy thing, no major pain, no complications, etc. That just simply isn't true.
    Well, there ya go .. . . everyone has a different experience.

    I had an epidural so no spinal headache. My incision didn't get infected and in fact healed fast and with not alot of pain. I am still numb there, which is weird but not bad. No clot.

    So for me a cesarean was no real big deal. That doesn't negate your experience at all. I didn't like labor pains - but I did it 3 times.

    steph
  7. by   Daywalker
    Quote from Gompers
    I really can't explain my fear of epidurals. We all have irrational fears in life, and that just happens to be one of mine, pure and simple. I am also overweight and have scoliosis. When I bend over, you sure as heck don't see a nice spine poking out. It won't be an easy poke. I've seen many epidurals placed in L&D and many spinal taps in the NICU - I can't stand watching either of them.
    I also have scoliosis and am overweight, but both my epis were just great, and it wasn't any more difficult for the docs to put them in. It just goes up higher. You'll be fine if you end up needing one.:spin:
  8. by   SueBee RN-BSN
    Primary elective c/s, money, money, and the timing goes the doctors way.
  9. by   rnin02
    Quote from Gompers
    I really can't explain my fear of epidurals. We all have irrational fears in life, and that just happens to be one of mine, pure and simple. I am also overweight and have scoliosis. When I bend over, you sure as heck don't see a nice spine poking out. It won't be an easy poke. I've seen many epidurals placed in L&D and many spinal taps in the NICU - I can't stand watching either of them.
    I'm not pregnant, but I totally, 100%, have the same fear of epidurals. Its not the thought that it will hurt going in, its just the whole idea. I hate to watch them. I hate watching spinal taps too, fortunately I haven't had to see alot of those. Its very difficult to explain this fear, it just totally creeps me out. You are not alone!
  10. by   subee
    Quote from judyblueeyes
    The difference in your examples are adults v. children. Also, what is reasonable to one person is not to another. Why should I let you dictate how I will have my children? Are you coming to my house to raise them, too? And why did you give me a general? Because you didn't like my choice of delivery? I though it was my birth.
    Anyone who has worked in OB knows that some women are not competent to make decisions during labor. Let's say that you've already had two sections and now you want general anesthesia for the third. My first obligation is, as I said, do no harm. We know that you have a lot of scar tissue in there from the previous two sections and this is not going to be a quick delivery...ergo the baby will suffer the effects of the induction drugs.
    Your baby's health is higher priority than your desire for general. We have TWO patients to take care of - its not all about you. I've never met a women who insisted on a general - never in 22 years. Many times I've given a general to a patient who would do better with a spinal - for a non-obstetrical procedure- but I always chart that the patient was advised a spinal but refused. I'd much prefer to be in court defending myself against a woman whining that she didn't get her general than a women with a child with permanent disability. Has absolutely nothing to do with how you want to raise your children - my job is to give you something to raise. (Oh, and its not just YOUR birth - its your baby's too).
  11. by   shazzie22
    i had an emergency c-section with my 1st, due to her being breech( she was actually stood up) and also going into distress. i had epidural which did not work fully so ended up with a ga. i must agree that sections take longer to get over. my second was a normal delivery, felt much more able to cope mentally and physically. at the end of the day you would do what is best for your baby`s health. during my nurse training i work on placement on a labour ward and had seen epidurals being given and always said that i would never have one. but on being told i needed an emergency section, i elected to have epidural as i felt it was preferable to a ga, only to end up having it anyway. ha! ha! just my luck
  12. by   cvssc
    There are several issues that bother me with this subject.

    C/S is a MAJOR abdominal surgery. These are real risks--bleeding, infection, damage to other organs, hysterectomy, and DEATH. Death is also the worse risk of anesthesia.

    Labor is painful. Yes, lawyers are involved so much in our sue happy society that we cannot provide patient care. We are providing lawyer resistent care. We can do a lot to help ease pain, but again, labor is just that--LABOR. Hard work is painful. Someone needs to explain this to people before they every have sex. You don't get something for nothing.

    The main reason epidural medication is used, it because it is the most relatively safe anesthesia to use. Let's stay with the path of lease law suit risk.

    Our society is so me, me, me conscious that we don't think about the baby. I don't want to hurt. I don't want stretch marks. I want to decide what day I deliver. What about the child that is going to turn your nice, neat little world upside down. That's what we need to think of. What's best for the baby. There's a reason we were made to have babies. It is a natural process.

    I work in a high risk unit. I have traveled. Let's not treat everyone like they are sick or a procedure to do. Let's let nature do what God intended unless he let's us knowhe would like us to help him.

    I have done it with and without epidurals. With, when induced for being that 17 year old first time mother with out of the world blood pressures. That was 25 years ago when no one went with you if you were not married. I don't think any of us has the upper hand on being scared. That epidural for a petrified kid wasn't so bad compared to the pain of having a 8# 10 oz baby with out an epidural. The amazing thing is, anmesia comes into play when you hold that child. How on earth do you think we have more than one child.

    We need to be an advocate for out patients--mother and child. Yes, there are risks with any delivery. But, I have seen death more with C/S than vaginal delivery.
  13. by   33-weeker
    Quote from Gompers
    That's what I don't understand about this whole thing - there IS pain with c-sections. It's major abdominal surgery and there is post-partum pain. It's just trading one pain for another, in my opinion. To me, avoiding pain doesn't seem to be a reason to choose surgery - it's going to hurt one way or another.
    I had drug-free labors twice. The first child, a 9 lb. daughter. I've never experienced a c-section, but I've watched grown women cry from the post-op pain. No thanks.

    I'll take labor over major abdominal surgery any day. At least labor is intermittent and temporary. It's over when the baby is born. I wanted to be comfortable and able to enjoy my newborns.

    (Hint: The secret to a comfortable vag. recovery is to choose a caregiver who won't do a 'vaginal cesarean' -- meaning cut you from end to end -- or let you tear. The midwife that delivered my 9 pounder had delivered 300 babies only giving 3 episiotomies, and she had never had anything worse than a second degree tear.)

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