Birth Ball question?

  1. Hey, can someone explain to me what a birthing ball is, and if/how you use this on your unit?
    •  
  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    they remind me of the old "Hippity Hops" kids played on long ago. It's a thick-rubber-skin ball that a person may sit, squat, lean over, rock on, to enhance comfort in labor. They can be inflated to differing sizes, usually like 3 feet in diameter I think (?).......Anyhow we have several of them, some love them, some would not try. They are worth a try if a person needs a change of position and are comfortable once figured out.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Apr 22, '03
  4. by   L&D.RN
    Some people love them and say they are so helpful in labor, but others hate 'em. We can't use them once the patient has an epidural, so for the most part they are helpful with NCB patients.
  5. by   kimtab
    The VP at my office sits on one at his desk. He says it's good for posture! Sorry not labor related but I thought it was so kooky I had to share.

    Kim
  6. by   renerian
    Learn something new every day..................

    renerian
  7. by   sbic56
    I have seen women benenfit greatly from using the BB. The position along with the rocking motion opens up the pelvis and allows the baby to move down nicely while providing a forgiving surface to sit on at the same time. It can be a great tool in my experience.
  8. by   layna
    The birthing ball is great for someone who is having back pain. I place it at the end of the bed on the floor, have the mom lean over on some pillows placed on end of bed while she is sitting on the ball- then place the coach behind her so that he/she can massage her back. Patients tell me that it is very comfortable to sit on. I had one patient the other day who would rather sit on the ball than on the bed!
  9. by   OB4ME
    Hmmm...We were just talking about this at work the other night! :-)

    We use birthing balls on our unit. The only problem is that ours are all really big (the 3ft ones). We get quite a few tiny moms, from areas like Guatamala, who are well under 5ft tall...so this tends to pose a challenge! I have this horrible mental picture of one of them trying to sit on our ball, and just rolling right up and over the back! LOL!

    At another hospital I worked at, we had a "birthing peanut"...same concept as the birthing ball, only it is peanut shaped. So, the mom would straddle the ball in the middle of the peanut...making it difficult to fall off, and more accessible to smaller women.
  10. by   mother/babyRN
    We use them but I have to admit I am a little afraid of them . I am always fearful my patient is going to fall off of one....
  11. by   nursenatalie
    Neat, I saw one that had a "stabilizer" of sorts that it sat in with a back of some sort. Kinda prevents falling over but also the rolling from side to side
  12. by   NurseyNursey
    They are the same thing as exercise balls. I saw a more tube shaped one at WalMart the other day. That would provide all of the same benefits without the fear of falling off.
  13. by   Burr
    We have 3 balls here at work. I like having the coach (dad) also use one, sitting behind our laboring mom. They can both move side to side with each other. Mom is facing the side of her bed and leaning over as the contraction builds. They are also a great item to use before birth. As the baby grows in weight there are many stretching exercises that she can do for comfort.
    Surch on-line for birthball exercises and you can find great information. We also use these in childbirth class. Even with internal monitors it is possible to use the ball.
  14. by   lgowan
    I as well as my moms who have used them love them! I am one of a few nurses at work who use the birthing ball. Helps tremendously with aiding in thinning the cervix, back labor, positioning. I got one mom up the other day who was 8cm. The nurse who was taking care of her asked me to help her with some doula techniques for the patient. She freaked when I got her up at 8cm! She went complete in no time! Imagine Sir Isaac Newton's theory working in childbirth!

    I don't believe moms were meant to labor on their backs.

    Lisa

close