Nursing in the UK - page 5

I am a registered nurse in the US, and I'd like to get some information on how nursing works in the UK...for example: 1. Are nurses called "Registered Nurses" or "Licensed Nurses" or are they... Read More

  1. by   Karen30
    I completely agree, the UK people are quick to moan when the services don't meet there expected standards but moan when taxes are increased or about to be increased. Sorry people of the UK, (myself included!), you don't get something for nothing these days!!!!
  2. by   JENNYG
    Hey All,

    I am a RN in the US with 5 years experience (3 years pediatrics and 2 years NICU). I have read a bunch of messages about nursing in the UK versus the US, including patient/nurse ratios and nurse responsibilities,but I haven't read anything about the NICU's in the UK. Does anyone have anything to share about working in a NICU in the UK? I recently finished training to take care of post-op cardiac NICU patients. DO they have this kind of nursing in the UK? Also, I know that the training in the UK is different than in the US when you want to specialize. DO you think that with a general nursing degree and on the job training in PEds/ NICU, I would be able to work in one of these specialites.
    I would greatly appreciate any information.

    Thanks!
  3. by   Mike RGN
    Hi JennyG
    Welcome to the forum

    I not 100% sure but I think you have to be a RSCN (Registered Sick Childrens Nurse), you could work in the Special care Baby unit (SCBU) or NICU but most nurses in these areas have this qualification rather than the general nursing qualification.

    You will always find exceptions in some hospitals but where I work that is the way it works.

    How your exceptional experience would transfer, would be down to the governing body (www.nmc-uk.org)and I have already given my thoughts on their thoughts on previous posts.

    A nurse working in this area I sure will give you more info, but may generate more replies if you start a new thread.
    Last edit by Mike RGN on Feb 3, '04
  4. by   fergus51
    I know several nurses who have gone to the UK to work NICU and they never have any problems with their qualifications.
  5. by   Good_Queen_Bess
    Hi Jenny. Although I don't work in NICU, I have had close ties with them. I can only say for the one's I know, but the nurse/patient ration is 1:1 plus one person co-ordinating, who is always an F or G grade (sister or senior sister).
  6. by   Betty_SPN_KS
    Just out of curiosity, why are female charge nurses called sisters in the UK? Makes me think of nuns
  7. by   Mike RGN
    Originally posted by Betty_SPN_KS
    Just out of curiosity, why are female charge nurses called sisters in the UK? Makes me think of nuns
    Never thought of it that way round, it would make more sense to me to ask why male sisters are called charge nurses.

    Have not got an answer, but they still scare me.
  8. by   Betty_SPN_KS
    Here a nurse in charge is a charge nurse whether male or female.
  9. by   donmurray
    Charge Nurse is a rank/grade in the uk. it's a title gradually being replaced with Ward Manager. Frankly I prefer Nurse in my title somewhere...
  10. by   Good_Queen_Bess
    Originally posted by Betty_SPN_KS
    Just out of curiosity, why are female charge nurses called sisters in the UK? Makes me think of nuns
    I have no idea where is originates. I prefer "charge nurse" myself.
  11. by   shadows mom
    I'm moving to UK in 2005. Can an ICU nurse from UK help me plan ahead on transitioning to NHS system of 'doing things'? I am currently working on licensure through the NMC. I have soooo many questions and would love to hear from someone currently working Intensive Care.
  12. by   jjjez
    Quote from DavidFR
    Sorry, but you are commenting on ONE socialized medical system.

    I now work in France where the system is excellent. The difference? UK -lowest rate of taxation in the European Union; France-one of the highest. You get what you pay for. The French are very community minded and very attached to their public services. The majority are proud to pay high taxes for good public services and while everybody would like to pay less tax, they see it as a necessity in a civilised society where everybody has access to good health care without having to worry if they can afford it or not. I'm afraid the selfish British public (and I speak as a Brit myself) will always vote for tax cuts, then moan that their schools, hospital and trains don't work.

    French nurses are highly skilled. All the tasks you describe (cannulation, catherization etc.) are done by nurses, though frankly, they were when I worked in the UK too so I don't see why your hospital was behind. Nurse patient ratios are not high, BUT the support workers here (Aide Soignantes) are highly trained and are almost like your LPN's or British EN's, so although you may be few registered nurses on a shift you have very good support from your Aide Soignantes. The French system works efficiently. There are no waiting lists like in the UK, it's high tech and dynamic. Of course it has it's problems like all systems, but what the French think of as a "problem" is often ten times worse in the UK.

    I have heard too many horror stories of what can happen to people in the US if they are not adequately covered for me to be convinced it is an attractive system. Didn't Clinton want to reform it? And wasn't he blocked by big business?. And you spend more on health care than any other developed nation for no better measurable outcomes.

    I believe there is no fairer system than the principle of health coverage for all funded by the state out of taxation and free at the point of delivery. The French example is proof that this can also be of a good quality. Give me socilailzed heath care any day!

    Well considering France, like Germany can't even afford their health care system, guess which country they're taking on ideas from???
    You've guessed it
    the NHS
  13. by   DavidFR
    Quote from jjjez
    Well considering France, like Germany can't even afford their health care system, guess which country they're taking on ideas from???
    You've guessed it
    the NHS

    Which is exactly why the government did so badly in last weekend's regional elections. If you look at the cantonal map of France it is now all red apart from Alscace which is the only region not to have gone socialist.
    Unlike the British, the French don't vote for tax cuts every time. They are very attached to their (very good) public services, and if they see them under threat (as under the Raffarin government), they vote accordingly. this is somewhat different from the British who rather selfishly voted for 19 years of Tory tax cuts, and now wonder why they have rubbish schools, hospitals at crisis points and trains that don't work.

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