Medical terminology vs Pharmacology

  1. 1
    Are medical terms almost the same as pharmacology terms? (Medications)

    To clarify if I learn medical prefixes, suffixes, and root words, will that give me a better understanding on breaking down medications and their meanings?

    Any apps, books, personal experience, websites, YouTube, or articles would be greatly appreciated


    I'm a pre nursing student and have been making digital flashcards, so I was curious. Not for a particular class, (not enrolled in school yet), but wanted to get a head start in my free time. Medical terms was a suggestion from my mother, a retired nurse of 40+ years. Love my mom.
    Esme12 likes this.
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 11 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Are medical terms almost the same as pharmacology terms? (Medications)

    To clarify if I learn medical prefixes, suffixes, and root words, will that give me a better understanding on breaking down medications and their meanings?

    Any apps, books, personal experience, websites, YouTube, or articles would be greatly appreciated


    I'm a pre nursing student and have been making digital flashcards, so I was curious. Not for a particular class, (not enrolled in school yet), but wanted to get a head start in my free time. Medical terms was a suggestion from my mother, a retired nurse of 40+ years. Love my mom.

    ***Admin sorry if this is a duplicate***
  5. 0
    ***Admin could you please delete this***
  6. 1
    To delete you need ask in the admin section-I believe.

    I'm a nursing student, medical terminology doesn't help with pharmacology ... in my sincere opinion.

    Medical terminology might be of help in knowing what medical terms (diseases & procedures) mean.

    -Cardiomyopathy
    *(heart) (muscle) (disease)
    -Arthritis
    *Arthro(joint) itis (inflammation)
    -Hyperthyroidism
    -Hyperkalemia
    *hyper(high) K(potassium) emia(blood)


    Drugs ... I haven't noticed them to follow some med term trend (maybe I'm wrong).

    Atropine ... doesn't remind me of any med terms.

    Neither does Levophed, Vancomycin, Zoloft, or Lasix.

    Meds have either the chemical name or the brand name.

    For pharmacology ... I recommend knowing your physiology and pathophysiology to help you understand the drug.


    My two cents as a student(:
    jplloyddd likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from StudentOfHealing
    To delete you need ask in the admin section-I believe.

    I'm a nursing student, medical terminology doesn't help with pharmacology ... in my sincere opinion.

    Medical terminology might be of help in knowing what medical terms (diseases & procedures) mean.

    -Cardiomyopathy
    *(heart) (muscle) (disease)
    -Arthritis
    *Arthro(joint) itis (inflammation)
    -Hyperthyroidism
    -Hyperkalemia
    *hyper(high) K(potassium) emia(blood)


    Drugs ... I haven't noticed them to follow some med term trend (maybe I'm wrong).

    Atropine ... doesn't remind me of any med terms.

    Neither does Levophed, Vancomycin, Zoloft, or Lasix.

    Meds have either the chemical name or the brand name.

    For pharmacology ... I recommend knowing your physiology and pathophysiology to help you understand the drug.


    My two cents as a student(:


    I accidentally posted this question three times. :P

    That helps so much. I only asked to see if I was able to get away with making less flash cards.

    On a more serious note thank you. That really cleared things up for me. I really do appreciate your post!
  8. 1
    You're not far off. While drug names are not related to medical terms, usually drugs within a class share endings or similar sounding endings. This usually only applies to the generic names. There are no hard and fast rules to naming drugs that I know of. But here are some examples;
    -azole (antifungals)fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole
    -parin (anticoagulants) ardeparin, dalteparin, enoxaparin, heparin, warfarin
    -pril (ACE Inhibitors) lisinopril, moexipril, enalapril, captopril, ramipril, trandolapri
    Going back to the list studentofhealing gave, Vancomycin has the ending -mycin, which is an ending you hear a lot. Vancomycin belongs to a class of drugs called Aminoglycosides which is a type of anti-infective. Other drugs in this group include, neomycin, streptomycin, tobramycin, and gentamycin. Similarly,drugs that end with -romycin (azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin) are macolides, another form of anti-infective.
    jplloyddd likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from RLtinker
    You're not far off. While drug names are not related to medical terms, usually drugs within a class share endings or similar sounding endings. This usually only applies to the generic names. There are no hard and fast rules to naming drugs that I know of. But here are some examples;
    -azole (antifungals)fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole
    -parin (anticoagulants) ardeparin, dalteparin, enoxaparin, heparin, warfarin
    -pril (ACE Inhibitors) lisinopril, moexipril, enalapril, captopril, ramipril, trandolapri
    Going back to the list studentofhealing gave, Vancomycin has the ending -mycin, which is an ending you hear a lot. Vancomycin belongs to a class of drugs called Aminoglycosides which is a type of anti-infective. Other drugs in this group include, neomycin, streptomycin, tobramycin, and gentamycin. Similarly,drugs that end with -romycin (azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin) are macolides, another form of anti-infective.
    This just made my night!

    Was wondering if there was a way to catagorize drugs. You speak of classes, and the endingendings.

    A major light just clicked on. Now that I know this with repitition of these clues will now allow me to really grasp the concept. Thank you!!

    I am sure this is all very simple for you, but a whole new world to me. I almost want to stop with my medical terms just to start some pharmacology cards. Ha.
  10. 1
    Threads merged.
    jplloyddd likes this.
  11. 1
    WELCOME TO AN! The largest online nursing community!

    LOL......anytime anyone needs help you can go to the help desk by using the Help Desk icon at the bottom of the page or by using the yellow triangle button in the bottom left hand corner or every post...this is the report button. A que box will appear and type what you need OR to to report a post. Threads merged.

    Medical terminology will help you a lot is figuring out questions so you can get tot he right answer...here are a few good sites.

    Common medical terminology. Suffix, prefix, and root words.

    Medical Terminology Activities

    http://medicine.tamhsc.edu/academic-...vocabulary.pdf
    jplloyddd likes this.
  12. 1
    Quote from Esme12
    WELCOME TO AN! The largest online nursing community!

    LOL......anytime anyone needs help you can go to the help desk by using the Help Desk icon at the bottom of the page or by using the yellow triangle button in the bottom left hand corner or every post...this is the report button. A que box will appear and type what you need OR to to report a post. Threads merged.

    Medical terminology will help you a lot is figuring out questions so you can get tot he right answer...here are a few good sites.

    Common medical terminology. Suffix, prefix, and root words.

    Medical Terminology Activities

    http://medicine.tamhsc.edu/academic-...vocabulary.pdf
    You are so awesome, (I'm sure you already know that), and thank you for taking the time to help me, and anyone else who was confused about this!

    I appreciate the links, so if you or anyone else has more input in reguards to resources my door is wide open. 😊

    I love this place!
    Esme12 likes this.


Top