how do i calculate intake and output?

  1. 0
    i'm only in level 1 and i have an exam coming up for my basic concepts/fundamentals of nursing class. my professor gave us a blueprint on how many questions on each topic will be on the exam. she mentioned that there will be 2 questions on intake and output where we will need a pen or pencil. i'm assuming we will be calculating but i'm not sure what she was talking about. we didn't have a lecture on it, but does anyone know what she may be possibly talking about on calculating intake/output?? or questions on that topic? she usually asks us nclex style questions
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  4. 6 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    I would quess that intake would be calculating the amount of fluid intake( adding together all fluid by each size cup), output,typically, adding together the cc's each time you empty a foley. Just a quess though.
  6. 0
    One time on my test they made it tricky by having some things in mL and some in cups so you had to get everything into the same unit so be ready.
  7. 0
    Quote from onlyj
    i'm only in level 1 and i have an exam coming up for my basic concepts/fundamentals of nursing class. my professor gave us a blueprint on how many questions on each topic will be on the exam. she mentioned that there will be 2 questions on intake and output where we will need a pen or pencil. i'm assuming we will be calculating but i'm not sure what she was talking about. we didn't have a lecture on it, but does anyone know what she may be possibly talking about on calculating intake/output?? or questions on that topic? she usually asks us nclex style questions
    What course are you in? Fundie's typically coveres I&O extensively...along w/other "basic" care."

    I&O is all in and out - reglardless of cath or not. You use a 'hat' or a 'catch' when they output. All fluids...i.e. IV & PO are ordered & calculated in most cases mL's...you may have to calculate cc's to mL's as follows:

    1 cc = 1 cubic centimeter
    1 ml = 1 milliliter

    The prefix milli means 1/1000th.

    One liter is defined as the volume of a 10 cm cube.
    10 x 10 x 10 = 1000 cc.

    If 1 ml is 1/1000 of a liter, and one liter is 1000 cc, then:

    1 /1000 x 1000 = 1.

    1 cc = 1 ml.

    Sooooo easy - 'most' facilities have computer systems that calculate - you just verify/administer/DOCUMENT if they are an I&O!

    GL
  8. 0
    1 cup = 8 oz

    1 oz = 30ml

    1L = 1000ml

    Ex patient had 1 cup coffee for am
    8oz broth for lunch

    And 500ml pitcher.

    How many mls total did the patient have? Patient is on a 700 ml fluid restriction. Did the patient go over?

    I just made this up but I'm pretty sure thats how you're going to be tested.

    Also don't forget iv fluids tha infuse into the patient as well
  9. 0
    Wonder If Some One Ought There can suggest To Me A Medical Controversy Topis I Have A 5 Page Report To Do On Medical Controversy ,Was Going To Do It On The Legal use of Marjiu can Maybe Someone Throw Me Some Suggestions...... Is Tube Feed a Good Subject??? Not Sure Hope Someone Can Help Me Out!!! Thank You
  10. 0
    Total up how many cc's or mL's of intake (including IV's, IV flushes, any blood products that the patient received, tube feeds) and also total up how many cc's or mL's of output (urine, liquid stool, emesis, any estimated blood loss from surgery if applicable, NG output). It helps to know basic conversions and measurements.

    30mL = 1oz
    120mL = 4oz
    240mL = 8oz
    5mL = 1tsp
    15mL = 1tbsp (the last two are more applicable to peds)

    Also if the patient is drinking coffee, do not forget to include creamers if the patient used any! that also counts as intake. Creamers are 15mL each.


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