Dosage Calculation (Heparin)

  1. 0
    Hello nurses and student nurses..
    I need some help figuring out the answer to a heparin problem. I'm coming up with an answer but I'm not quite sure if I have it correct. Please guide me...
    4. ORDER: Give a heparin drip of 25, 000 units in 500 cc D5W at 9 cc/hr

    Heparin: Prevents recurrence of thrombosis; use with tPa. Adjust dose to keep
    APTT at 1.5-2.0 times control. ASA often given with heparin. Protamine reverses
    heparin. Watch for bleeding.

    Available is 10,000 units/1 cc

    QUESTION: How many cc of heparin would be added to the IV?

    Would this formula work?
    Desired amount = cc
    Conc in sum

    QUESTION: What is the concentration of heparin per cc in the IV bag after
    itís mixed?

    QUESTION: How many units of heparin per hour is the patient receiving?
    QUESTION: If the MD ordered the drip increased by 200 units/hr, what
    would the IV rate be (cc/hr)?

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  2. 4 Comments...

  3. 0
    Quote from YGPHNM
    Hello nurses and student nurses..
    I need some help figuring out the answer to a heparin problem. I'm coming up with an answer but I'm not quite sure if I have it correct. Please guide me...
    4. ORDER: Give a heparin drip of 25, 000 units in 500 cc D5W at 9 cc/hr

    Heparin: Prevents recurrence of thrombosis; use with tPa. Adjust dose to keep
    APTT at 1.5-2.0 times control. ASA often given with heparin. Protamine reverses
    heparin. Watch for bleeding.

    Available is 10,000 units/1 cc

    QUESTION: How many cc of heparin would be added to the IV?

    Would this formula work?
    Desired amount = cc
    Conc in sum

    QUESTION: What is the concentration of heparin per cc in the IV bag after
    itís mixed?

    QUESTION: How many units of heparin per hour is the patient receiving?

    QUESTION: If the MD ordered the drip increased by 200 units/hr, what
    would the IV rate be (cc/hr)?
    Omg what a question , i'll give it a shot
    needed 25,000 units of Heparin on hand 10,000 unit /1cc

    so 10,000units : 1 cc :: 25,000units : x
    10,000:1::25,000:x
    1 x 25,000 = 25,000
    X x 10,000 = 10,000x
    10,000x / 10,000 = x
    25,000 / 10,000 = 2.5 so x = 2.5cc

    2.5 cc of hep will be added to iv
    25,000/2.5cc cocentrate
    9 cc/hr
  4. 0
    question: how many cc of heparin would be added to the iv?
    25,000 units/ 10,000 units/ml = 2.5ml

    question: what is the concentration of heparin per cc in the iv bag after
    it’s mixed?

    25,000units/500ml = 50units/ml

    question: how many units of heparin per hour is the patient receiving?
    answer is in the order; 9ml/hr.

    question: if the md ordered the drip increased by 200 units/hr, what
    would the iv rate be (cc/hr)?
    here is how you solve this one. your original order is for 9ml/hr, right? that means you are running 450 units of heparin per hour (50 units/ml x 9ml). now the md ordered an additional 200 units per hour for a total of 650 units/hr. so: 650units/50 units per ml = 13ml/hr.
  5. 0
    question 1: if the 10000 U of heparin is in 1 ml then the 25000 would be in 2.5 ml each 10000 is in 1 ml and the 5000 in the 25000 gets 0.5 ml so add them 1+1+5=2.5 ..... 2.5 ml is the answer .

    question 2: the concentration of heparin/ the cc in the bag =25000/500= 50 U/cc

    question 3 : units of heparin/24 hrs = 25000/24= 1042 U/hr

    question 4 :
    1042 u/hr +200 u/hr =1242
    1042 U/hr >>>>9 cc/hr
    1242 U/hr>>>>> X
    = 1242*9/1042= 10cc/hr

    Last edit by smily11 on Dec 17
  6. 2
    Quote from smily11
    question 1: if the 10000 U of heparin is in 1 ml then the 25000 would be in 2.5 ml each 10000 is in 1 ml and the 5000 in the 25000 gets 0.5 ml so add them 1+1+5=2.5 ..... 2.5 ml is the answer .

    question 2: the concentration of heparin/ the cc in the bag =25000/500= 50 U/cc

    question 3 : units of heparin/24 hrs = 25000/24= 1042 U/hr

    question 4 :
    1042 u/hr +200 u/hr =1242
    1042 U/hr >>>>9 cc/hr
    1242 U/hr>>>>> X
    = 1242*9/1042= 10cc/hr

    Alas, considerably wrong. I think you did this much too fast without really understanding the question, and as a result you have both misunderstood your patient's initial dose (450 units per hour, not 1042) and underdosed your patient significantly when figuring out his increase of 200 units per hour. Instead of getting 650 units per hour, he would only get 500 units per hour if you increased him to 10cc/hour. I have no idea how you decided to use the calculations you showed us.

    How did I figure that out?
    Q1, correct-- if it's 10,000 units in 1cc, then if you want 25,000 units, you want 2.5 cc

    Q2, correct -- if it's 25,000 units in 500 cc, it's 50 units in 1 cc

    Q3-- this is where you totally missed the boat. If the patient is getting 9cc/hour, and there are 50 Units in one cc, then the patient is getting 9x50 units = 450 units per hour.
    I have no idea why you thought dividing a 500cc bag by 24 hours would give you anything useful, as it has nothing to do with the prescribed dose per hour. You might be confusing this with the idea that IV bags are changed every 24 hours, but that doesn't mean they are emptied completely every 24 hours.

    Q4-- Having gotten Q3 wrong, you can't get Q4 right. If the patient is getting 9cc/hour, that being 450 units per hour, and the prescription is to increase it by 200 units, that's an increase of 4cc/hour, since you know that there are 50 units in 1cc. Total then is 9+4 = 13cc/hour for a total of 650 units per hour. NO idea whatsoever how you came up with an increase of 9cc to 10cc and thought that made sense. Can you explain where you went wrong, and why?
    Last edit by GrnTea on Dec 17
    Esme12 and KelRN215 like this.


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