BN vs. BSN

  1. I currently hold an ASN but would like to get a BSN but having difficulty finding a program that does not require clinicals. Came across a distance learning school from out of UK which supposedly has been accredited here in the US. However, they offer a BN program as opposed to a BSN program; anybody know the difference? I assumed one was a bachlor's of nursing as opposed to a bachlor's of science in nursing. Does anyone know what difference this credentialing will make when it comes to getting a job here in the US?
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    NLN approved RN to BSN programs are going to have a clinical component. But it's not the tradiditional type clinicals. Look at accreditation when looking for an online program. (See the sticky at the top of the Distance/Online learning forum here. I'll move this post there.) Good luck!

    In my program at Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences, it was all online. Clinical hours were given for teaching peers things such as drugs, presenting a research article, teaching a population (such as the kids in the neighborhood, or your friends, or coworkers) a topic, etc. We had to interview two nurse excetives and got clinical hours that way. I showed a nurse practioner for 8 hours. That was the extent of the "clinicals".
  4. by   Lizzy6
    Quote from newstart1
    I currently hold an ASN but would like to get a BSN but having difficulty finding a program that does not require clinicals. Came across a distance learning school from out of UK which supposedly has been accredited here in the US. However, they offer a BN program as opposed to a BSN program; anybody know the difference? I assumed one was a bachlor's of nursing as opposed to a bachlor's of science in nursing. Does anyone know what difference this credentialing will make when it comes to getting a job here in the US?
    You mentioned you already have your ASN, so I am assuming you have taken your state boards, correct? Your country mentions USA, so whether you obtain your BSN or a BN (guess your are looking at Univ of Dundee), then why would you have trouble getting a job in the states, since you already took your boards & passed...assuming your boards were taken in the states. If you are talking about Dundee, the school is accredited, NLNAC. I contacted the NLNAC for further info, below is the website for the NLNAC with this university listed as accredited as well as website.

    http://www.nlnac.org/Forms/directorySearch.asp

    Hope this is helpful.

    Lizzie
  5. by   newstart1
    you are correct I am currently working under my ASN, however I am considering more administration and most require BSN minimal; just wondering if they would consider BN as well
  6. by   Lizzy6
    Quote from newstart1
    you are correct I am currently working under my ASN, however I am considering more administration and most require BSN minimal; just wondering if they would consider BN as well
    That is a good question. I guess I would check with a few facilities/companies that you are interested in & ask if a BN or Masters would be acceptable from Univ of Dundee. I know that both the BN and the masters from Dundee are accepted by the VA, state and federal installations. School is so costly & no one wants to be burdened with Stafford loans along with paying mortgages, utilities, car payments, food, ins, etc... Dundee is more affordable at least to me as compared to numerous colleges; however some companies may not view the "BN" as acceptable. Something you would have to look into. Best of luck!
  7. by   CraigB-RN
    If $$$ are what you are worried about, sometimes taking tradition route is the way to go. Taking a mix of online and traditional clasess and getting a BSN from a brick and morter school might be the best way for you.

    Don't assume that online/distance education is the best way. lot of homework and real look at all your options. Sometimes "shortcuts" actualy short change you. That being said, for what it is, the University of Dundee seems to be a good school, it's definitly not a Diploma Mill, but a real school were you will work for your degree.

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