Mom suing nurse after suffocation accident - page 11

This Mother Is Suing a Hospital for Millions After She Accidentally Killed Her Son... Read More

  1. by   klone
    Quote from AnnoyedNurse
    Klone- a cult like mentality exists in healthcare discouraging formula feeding. I even did a project for my BSN and found that this cult like mentality is very prevalent among paediatricians and hospital administrations. In their eyes, it's only acceptable to formula feed only ifthe mother cannot breast feed due to being breast less, severely sick and on dangerous meds etc.
    I am a board-certified lactation consultant. This is my bread and butter, so to speak. And I can assure you that there is no systemic cult-like mentality forcing women to breastfeed. There may be individual overzealous nurses, or institutions that do not follow the spirit of the BFHI.

    It *is* important to educate expectant moms on why breastfeeding is incredibly important to infant health. That is not a cult. That's science.
  2. by   klone
    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    If the nurses were pushed to push breast feeding, then wouldn't they then push breastfeeding on the new moms?
    They're not pushed to push breastfeeding. They're pushed to ENCOURAGE breastfeeding. Meaning - one of the expected duties of the nurses is to encourage it. As they should encourage all other positive health maintenance activities.
  3. by   bagladyrn
    Quote from AnnoyedNurse
    All nutrition whether for an adult or infant requires a doctor's order. So yes it is permissible granted there is a doctor's order. Most likely, this nurse did not call the doctor to get an order to feed the infant. You, however, are missing the entire point. The nurse has a role to keep her adult patient pain free and her newborn patient safe during the feeding. A patient on ambien should not be in the bed with an infant. End of story.
    No I am not missing the point. In many small to midsize hospitals there is no "well baby" nursery. The space exists but no staffing is allotted. A baby away from the mother is generally watched at the nurses station desk. Again, who do you think watches that child when her nurse is attending to her other patients? In many small to midsize OB depts. there either is no charge nurse or she has her own full patient load.
    In standard charting in a number of hospitals one must chart exactly when, for how long and for what purpose the child was removed from the room with the guideline that the total removal should be less than an hour.
    OB is a different kind of setting. I'm giving you this viewpoint as one who has worked in at least 30 different hospitals in 12 different states over the last 20 years as a contract nurse.
    Personally I think the best way to reduce these incidences is to mandate that hospitals bring back the well baby nursery nurse to help monitor and to give parents a good option if they choose to have respite.
  4. by   MunoRN
    When my first kid was born, our nurse gave us a goodie-bag from a formula manufacturer with bottles of formula, coupons, and promotional brochures, I found that pretty astounding at the time but apparently it wasn't unusual. My understanding is that there has been movement away from this promotion of formula unless there is a need for formula, and instead that breastfeeding has been encouraged whenever possible. Maybe I'm wrong, but my understanding is that when it's appropriate, breastfeeding is far superior to formula, so if our job is to promote health then why wouldn't we be encouraging breastfeeding?
  5. by   MunoRN
    Going back to the effects of lawsuits on healthcare costs, lawsuits are generally quoted as less than 1% of total costs and since tort reform would not do away with lawsuits all together, you're looking at potential savings of a fraction of a fraction of 1%. That doesn't mean it's not worthwhile, a small portion of $3 trillion is still a lot of money.

    There is no single definition of "defensive medicine" so the costs it accounts for varies widely, but it's commonly blamed for around 1-2% of our healthcare costs.
  6. by   MunoRN
    Quote from AnnoyedNurse
    All nutrition whether for an adult or infant requires a doctor's order. So yes it is permissible granted there is a doctor's order. Most likely, this nurse did not call the doctor to get an order to feed the infant. You, however, are missing the entire point. The nurse has a role to keep her adult patient pain free and her newborn patient safe during the feeding. A patient on ambien should not be in the bed with an infant. End of story.
    Like all MD orders, a legally competent patient or their decision maker is free to decline to follow those orders, MD orders pertaining to diet and nutrition are more accurately described as suggestions.
  7. by   GoodDay2017
    I agree. Bring back well baby nursery to all postpartum departments. Juggling 4 hig acuity couplets, moms who "hit the wall" at night, no family to help, or Dad is exhausted, they need a break. Being their nurse with 3 other couplets (One on Mag, SGA with unstable temps or one withdrawing) and no nursery nurse - we have to keep newborns at the nursing station and pray your peers will help watch while charting & holding baby, can get to be too much many nights! It is just not safe.
  8. by   klone
    Quote from GoodDay2017
    I agree. Bring back well baby nursery to all postpartum departments. Juggling 4 hig acuity couplets, moms who "hit the wall" at night, no family to help, or Dad is exhausted, they need a break. Being their nurse with 3 other couplets (One on Mag, SGA with unstable temps or one withdrawing) and no nursery nurse - we have to keep newborns at the nursing station and pray your peers will help watch while charting & holding baby, can get to be too much many nights! It is just not safe.
    I'm sorry for those of you who work in units that don't follow AWHONN's staffing guidelines. I'm pretty dogmatic about it. It's RARE that our nurses have 4 couplets, and CERTAINLY not if they moms or infants who aren't totally normal stable SVD or POD#2.
  9. by   JKL33
    Quote from AnnoyedNurse
    But also, I think a lot of nurses do not realise the power of ambien. The other night my nurse friend got an order of ambien to give her patient at 4am. She was running to the Pyxis to grab the Med and I asked "isn't it too late to give ambien? She can become delirious and crazy without a full nights sleep." She still gave the ambien.

    In our mother baby story here- the first problem is why are we waking the mother up once she has taken ambien? Read the label on ambien and then come in the defence of the nurse.
    And the provider who wrote the order, right? I agree with you, though, I rarely have heard nurses OR physicians act like ambien is any different than taking a benadryl or melatonin.

    Anyway, aside from anything and everything else, I think it will come down to ambien-related claims. I don't know how easy those will be to defend, since hospital/physician/nurse would be the entities responsible for knowing detailed information about ambien, not the patient. It will be said that the physician/nurses were in the position responsible for assessing the overall safety of the situation, and (whether we like it or not) that would be correct.

    I'm sure the lawyer is all over the ambien prescribing and use information, and it just won't look good.

    I'm very sad for the nurse who is individually named though. I imagine a situation where so much is out of the control of the individual nurse - - all the various factors people have been commenting on here, and maybe more that is facility-specific. I still do not understand how a nurse gets named and the provider/orderer doesn't.

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