Nurses who don't take the time to care: have you seen examples? - page 4

Hi everyone, I'm writing an essay about caring in nusing (caring meaning the "tending to the spiritual/emotional needs of the patient" part above and beyond their physical needs). Specifically,... Read More

  1. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from minnieme104
    I have been recently caring for a 2 week post CVA and he was c/o abd.pain in the RLQ. I asked my instructor what I could do for this patient because he could not recieve any more tylenol prn it wasn't time yet. She looked at me and said nothing other then getting a warm blanket, well this pt. is always warm and that warm blanket would just get thrown on the floor. I was devistated that she said nothing. To me this was not being very caring and I had to then decided for myself what to do. Against my instructors wishes
    so what did you do minnie?
  2. by   minnieme104
    Quote from earle58
    so what did you do minnie?
    Well I reported to the Charge nurse and kept going in and taking a temp on him to make sure that the temp was not increasing, and I also gave him a sponge bath to try to cool him down a little. I was encouraging him to lay on his left side so that gas could pass if it needed to and it seemed to give him a little relief
  3. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from minnieme104
    Well I reported to the Charge nurse and kept going in and taking a temp on him to make sure that the temp was not increasing, and I also gave him a sponge bath to try to cool him down a little. I was encouraging him to lay on his left side so that gas could pass if it needed to and it seemed to give him a little relief
    excellent intervention. in nsg. you'll always step on someone's toes but what you did 100% was advocating for your pt. good job.
  4. by   minnieme104
    Quote from earle58
    excellent intervention. in nsg. you'll always step on someone's toes but what you did 100% was advocating for your pt. good job.
    Thank you very much it is nice having some reassurance being a student. I still question everything I do so Thanks again
  5. by   moia
    that was absolutely the best thing to do...sometimes just acknowledging the patients pain can be enough. As a patient I know that once someone acknowledges your pain it becomes easier to cope with it...I have had nurses that never asked and that can make you really anxious because no one wants to be whiner or have a nurse think you are a big baby.
    Giving suggestions for relief and actively monitoring vitals gives validation to the patient and reassures them that they are being payed attention to.
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from jax
    One of the reasons I only work part time is that I do care, and it is increasingly hard to do so.

    The rewarding part of nursing is being able to spend time with your patients, learning about them, their lives, families and the impact of their hospitalisation on all of these.

    I am finding that my workload is generally so heavy, pt. acuity is very high, that you do what you must first, to keep every-one safe, and it doesn't leave much time left for the "caring". It's a balancing act, and as I'm getting older it's one that I am beginning to lose the taste for..

    jax
    I can totally identify with your post. Give the new grads some time, and they will, too.
  7. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from CCU NRS
    I agree whole heartedly. The biggest problem with this particular site is that people that are students and have never done any Pt care outside of a very controlled environment and only one or two at a time come here and ctitique people that have been nurses for any number of years.

    In fact and this is one that really burns my bum is that some of the people may not even be students yet or even considering a nursing career and they have all the glorious opinons and idea's about how and what nursing is and should be.

    Just my little Rant, I did not mention anyone in particular(notice) so if you flame me you will be making yourself be seen as one of these very people, I am aware that everyone has an opinion and they are entitled to it, what I would suggest however is that until you have actually performed Pt care in a real setting without it being controlled by your instructor or basically just one or two Pts at a time (unless you are CCU etc)you should perhaps temper your judgement of what the actual situation is until you have had some actual experience.

    Thank You Very Much



    CCU NRS has left the building!

    I agree completely. Some of the future nurses who are so critical of seasoned nurses need to walk a mile in our white shoes.
  8. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from jayna
    Very interesting article I SAW ONLINE about The supports and constraints of caring in nursing

    http://www.mills.edu/INTRO/AAMC/QUAR...ng03.20-28.pdf

    Staing there are caring for and caring about in nursing..Read on.
    Excellent article, Jayna! Thank you so much for telling us about it.
  9. by   stbernardclub
    Quote from CyndiW35055
    Actually, a fellow student was told by an RN not to worry about doing to much for her pt. as the pt. was about to die. When the student asked the RN why she wouldn't do much, she was told by the RN that she would just be wasting time on the pt. and that she would do better by spending that time with another pt instead. The pt did die, that day in fact. The student, being assigned to that pt though, still spent the quality time with the pt, bathing her, turning her, ROM and everything. The family actually sent a letter to the hospital administrator commending her for this behavior and recommended that the hospital "grab her up before someone else does".

    The RN though, after having been heard by the students clinical instructor, received a written warning from the ADON regarding her lack of care. The RN resigned within two weeks. So, let that be a warning I guess.
    I would like to hear the nurses side of the story here. As you will learn once you are a r.n on the floor with a full case load of patients and also asked(which a r.n. could say no) to be a preceptor,there is a constant balance of time per patient.If a patient is alert/oriented/recovering well and has family support,you would not be needed as much in that room, but you could never pull up a seat and spend the day in a room, even though you would just love to do it. As I recall, a nursing student has a few patients a little resposability.As for the nursing instructor just so happening to be standing there and hearing "negativity", I would think she would have interveened then.Hummmm...don't set yourself up to be an unliked nurse!I hope the R.N. involved,if innocent, goes on to a much more supportive workplace.
    Last edit by stbernardclub on May 20, '04

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