Bedside report/hand off - page 3

by winter_green 3,908 Views | 27 Comments

We're starting something new... bedside report/hand off. Benefits? Anyone in here require to do the same at their facility? How do you like it???... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from tokmom
    Actually it isn't a HIPAA violation.

    As for diagnosis that the pt does not know about. Obvioulsy those are done outside the room in private. Family issues...private. Like another poster said, if a pt has been there for a while, we do the diagnosis before we get to the patient and go over things that are new for the day.

    I like it and so do the patients. They are on their call light less, and they feel part of their care. We ask them what their goals are for the day. Sometimes they are completely different than ours. It just really gets everyone on the same page.
    How is this not a violation?
    Roommates, visitors, housekeeping, dietary... can hear the private medical information shared in basic report.
  2. 2
    My favorite report....

    In bed, been fed, got meds, nothin' red, none dead, 'nuf said ...
    tokmom and MrsHijinx08 like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from tokmom
    Actually it isn't a HIPAA violation.

    As for diagnosis that the pt does not know about. Obvioulsy those are done outside the room in private. Family issues...private. Like another poster said, if a pt has been there for a while, we do the diagnosis before we get to the patient and go over things that are new for the day.

    I like it and so do the patients. They are on their call light less, and they feel part of their care. We ask them what their goals are for the day. Sometimes they are completely different than ours. It just really gets everyone on the same page.

    We do hourly rounding too (I know it sounds like it would be to much) but the results have been the patients on the call lights around 67% less.

    Usually the nurse and aide (if you have one) swap off each hour. It doesn't have to be in depth, it's just a matter of popping your head in (while making sure your slacker tracker picks up ) and making sure all is OK. If they are sleeping you leave them alone and if awake you see if they need anything. It's really had good results.
  4. 1
    I will add. We have private rooms here. We go in the room and shut the door. We aren't yelling so it's not violating hipaa, the important stuff is discussed right before entering (we don't have people all over to overhear) the bedside part is more for the patients needs. Involving them in the plan of care and any questions or concerns they might have. If family is present we will ask if it's ok to speak in front of the friends or family.


    The whole thing goes very smoothly without any problems.
    Last edit by ~Mi Vida Loca~RN on Jul 27, '11
    tokmom likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from Altra
    "A&O x 2, still rhonchorous bilaterally, +2 edema bilateral lower extremities, pulse ox 90-91% on 4L, thinking about upper her Lasix and putting in a Foley. Ativan 1mg q 4 PRN."
    Quote from tokmom
    If I'm passing on a report, about a cellulitis...do I NEED to say more edematous? Why not say it is looking more swollen in front of the patient? The oncoming nurse understands what the heck I'm talking about.
    There are times the medical jargon might be needed and I have used it..sparingly. That is when I tell the pt what it means. Why not take the fear out of medicine?
    I'm not saying how I feel about it either way because I just don't know yet. A sincere question for you, tokmom: I would like you to tell me how to give Altra's report in front of the patient. Or, would that be the stuff said just outside the room?

    I got a job offer from a facility that uses bedside rounds, but the one I took a job at does not. (Not because of that, though). I guess I just can't visualize how the pertinent information would be given, as I've spent the past 18 months talking like a nurse, and I can't NOT speak that way to another nurse.
  6. 0
    At my LTC facility we are required to. Most of the residents are stable and rarely change, but we recently had an incident where a resident was found dead face down on the floor two hours after shift change. She failed to come to supper and she was found by an aide in her room. She was a full code and it turned out to be very nasty-the state was with us a long time.
  7. 0
    I don’t like complete bedside reporting but I think a hybrid between the two should exist. I believe the verbal part should take part outside of the patient’s room and to include looking over orders, labs and care plans with each other. I don’t care what the nurse tells me what IVF is hanging; I want to know what the order first. It could have changed 6 hours ago and not updated. After this you both should see the patient to provide hand off and go over abnormal assessment findings. What you consider mildly distended may be grossly distended to me.

    Giving report in a patient’s room is not HIPPA. If it were, nurses would all be mimes.
  8. 0
    Quote from winter_green
    We're starting something new... bedside report/hand off. Benefits? Anyone in here require to do the same at their facility? How do you like it???
    Had to do it at a place I travel nursed at. Some days, you LOVE it, others you HATE it. The thing that decides which it will be that day: Who you are taking over for.

    If you are taking over for chicken little who never stops running around in circles accomplishing nothing, you will hate it. They will put off giving report forever and ever while they pass this med late, fill out this form they forgot, get this coffee someone asked for an hour ago. You end up being behind all day because you stood around waiting for them to realize the sky is not actually falling. Then, they don't have time to do it properly and any advantages it presents you with are lost.


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