any FILIPINO members here? - page 6

hi!!im also a filipino and im here in the Philippines..just to know some filipino members and to ask tips from them on how they were employed in the US...im currently working as a nurse specialist in... Read More

  1. by   purplefly
    :roll hi to all my kababayans in this thread...:roll
  2. by   nrswnabee
    Quote from rpangeles
    You have to agree that an ADN gotten here is much better than a BSN received in the Philippines as you don't have to go to the whole process of getting CGFNS, TOEFL and IELTS which really delays a nurse's move to the US. When you finish your ADN, all you have to worry about is getting through NCLEX and finding a job. I have observed that hospitals here donot give as much emphasis from where you graduated as much as they do in the Philippines. And with the shortage, an ADN is worth the same as a BSN.
    Don't get me wrong though, Filipinos are treasured in hospitals here due to the quality of care that they give. I have been through a nursing home and a medical center as part of my clinicals and in both sites Filipino nurses are holding positions of resposibility.
    --------

    hello, rpangeles.
    yes, that's one way of looking at it. but if i want to move up the ladder, i'd still have to get a bsn after this adn sometime soon. so while i'm exempt from cgfns and ielts/toefl, i don't think i'll be offered a wider range of opportunities given to bsn holders. i may be able to save on the cgfns and english language tests but i'll definitely need to spend for tuition/fees to secure that "bs" to my nursing degree. on financial terms, i find that going back to school costs more here than going through cgfns/language tests in the phils. other things considered, i agree, it's debatable....

  3. by   ketones
    Hello! Im a filipina nurse just recently passed the local nursing board here in the philippines and waiting for my license to be released. Im planning to take the exam of cgfns this year. Please sends some tips for the subject areas to be reviewed.
  4. by   rpangeles
    Quote from nrswnabee
    --------

    hello, rpangeles.
    yes, that's one way of looking at it. but if i want to move up the ladder, i'd still have to get a bsn after this adn sometime soon. so while i'm exempt from cgfns and ielts/toefl, i don't think i'll be offered a wider range of opportunities given to bsn holders. i may be able to save on the cgfns and english language tests but i'll definitely need to spend for tuition/fees to secure that "bs" to my nursing degree. on financial terms, i find that going back to school costs more here than going through cgfns/language tests in the phils. other things considered, i agree, it's debatable....

    You also have to factor in the time that it will take you to get an immigrant visa. If you finish from a school in the Philippines, you will be treated as a foreign school graduate and subject to the cgfns, toefl, etc., but also and most important of all you will have to wait for visa clearance, embassy interviews and all the bummer stuff that you undergo just to get here. This adds up to a couple of years after you have graduated. Of course, you can come here after school and try to get a hospital to sponsor you. You should be aware though that at present you can cannot change status in country but you'll have to go back to the Philippines to get your immigrant visa. If you are already here nrswnabee stay here and get your degree here. Start off with an ADN which will cost you about $1300/sem. If you are on a student visa, talk to the school if there is any way you can get financial aid (even if it's in term of a college loan or a work program). After getting your ADN, work (and believe me there's plenty of work to be had). After a year, go for your BSN nad your MSN if you so feel inclined. You will then have the funds to pursue your education.

    I'm telling you all these from 1st hand experience. It took my wife several years just to get us all here (to think she already had a US license as far back as 1987). I'm now in my 2nd term in the nursing program with a year more to go to get an ADN (knock on wood!). The hospital and nursing home that I had done my clinical in are already arranging for summer internships for my batch. In these facilitiies, except for the Filipino nurses, most (about 50%) of nurses are ADN holder, not BSN. Unfair as it may be, they earn the same rate as the Filipino BSN holders (Pinay nurses just work more OT which is why they earn more). It's all about the shortage.
  5. by   nrswnabee
    Quote from rpangeles
    You also have to factor in the time that it will take you to get an immigrant visa. If you finish from a school in the Philippines, you will be treated as a foreign school graduate and subject to the cgfns, toefl, etc., but also and most important of all you will have to wait for visa clearance, embassy interviews and all the bummer stuff that you undergo just to get here. This adds up to a couple of years after you have graduated. Of course, you can come here after school and try to get a hospital to sponsor you. You should be aware though that at present you can cannot change status in country but you'll have to go back to the Philippines to get your immigrant visa. If you are already here nrswnabee stay here and get your degree here. Start off with an ADN which will cost you about $1300/sem. If you are on a student visa, talk to the school if there is any way you can get financial aid (even if it's in term of a college loan or a work program). After getting your ADN, work (and believe me there's plenty of work to be had). After a year, go for your BSN nad your MSN if you so feel inclined. You will then have the funds to pursue your education.

    I'm telling you all these from 1st hand experience. It took my wife several years just to get us all here (to think she already had a US license as far back as 1987). I'm now in my 2nd term in the nursing program with a year more to go to get an ADN (knock on wood!). The hospital and nursing home that I had done my clinical in are already arranging for summer internships for my batch. In these facilitiies, except for the Filipino nurses, most (about 50%) of nurses are ADN holder, not BSN. Unfair as it may be, they earn the same rate as the Filipino BSN holders (Pinay nurses just work more OT which is why they earn more). It's all about the shortage.
    --------------
    thanks again, rpangeles for sharing your experiences. i believe it is not necessarily better or wiser for anyone to take a nursing course and be a nurse in the us either in the philippines or the us WITHOUT thoroughly considering his situtation--- e.g. immigrant status (is a us citizen/lpr immediate relative currently petitioning him), educational background (is he pursuing nursing in the phils. now or engaged in an entirely different field?), etc.

    i understand you came here as an immigrant hence studying for you isn't as costly. as an f1 student i had to shell out $3800 (good thing by installment!) to cover my fall tuition (yes, i'm now in the us as a student, registered for spring term and just waiting for my admittance to clinicals by fall).

    an int'l student does get his own "bummer stuff" like how the h*** you're going to stretch your budget (i paid $3800 last fall. rates for int'l students are more than twice the resident's rate!) given that it's illegal to work and there's rumors that tution/fees are going to increase. you may be able to work in school but hello... for a measly $8/ hour! yes it helps but definitely not to pay for tuition...financial aid is obviously open only to lprs (legal permanent residents) and citizens. try scholarships but most (if not all), will ask for one-year residence in the same school and others want you to have residence in a given town or city for many years. there is also the possibility to get an employment authorization via "economic hardship" but the processing is painfully slow (90 days but actually 5-6 months), restrictive (you're asked document after document) and not guaranteed. after 9/11, most applications are denied than approved.

    i've read from suzanne that an f1 student is exempt from english language proficiency tests (toefl,ielts) but visa screening is a must even if you received your nursing degree in the us. if i understand right, there should be no problem shifting to immigrant visa while here in the us so long as one maintains his status (no record of falling out of status--ever!) and isn't involved in any crime (hmmm...unless not using the crosswalk sometimes is something i should worry about...). in my case, i believe i need to think essentially of 3 things--- Get my adn done, Pass the nclex, Work for a facility or hospital willing to sponsor during my optional practical training (who will at least turn in AOS papers for me before my opt expires. i believe i don't need to go back home to the phils. just to get my immigrant visa this way.

    the reason why i came to the us is really personal and beyond this forum. however, i felt that if i had another choice, i would have chosen to study nursing in the phils. despite the wait. i don't want my kababayans to think that it's completely BETTER to study nursing in the us than in the phils. because financially, it could be a major STRAIN. BE PREPARED--financially first then others....unless of course you come here on an immigrant visa, that's a different story altogether....or you're darn rich!

    but if anyone does have a family-based petition coming up and absolutely desiring to work as a nurse in the us but not having the right degree, i wouldn't hesitate for you to get your nursing studies DONE in the phils. while waiting. it's productive use of time.

    i welcome anymore inputs, correction, etc.....i'm no lawyer and i just figured these things out based on experience and reading...
  6. by   elkaye
    hi.. im a filipino too.. im new here.. hope we could get along... im a 3rd yr nursing student..

    God Bless you all.
  7. by   IseeU_rn
    Quote from nrswnabee
    --------

    hello, rpangeles.
    yes, that's one way of looking at it. but if i want to move up the ladder, i'd still have to get a bsn after this adn sometime soon. so while i'm exempt from cgfns and ielts/toefl, i don't think i'll be offered a wider range of opportunities given to bsn holders. i may be able to save on the cgfns and english language tests but i'll definitely need to spend for tuition/fees to secure that "bs" to my nursing degree. on financial terms, i find that going back to school costs more here than going through cgfns/language tests in the phils. other things considered, i agree, it's debatable....

    Hi nrswnabee! It's nice to see you again I just wanted to let you know that don't worry about opportunities for adn vs bsn. There are tons of open jobs that you can literally decline or choose offers. As long as you pass the NCLEX, jobs will be swarming! You will have the same chances as BSNs do. Because of the shortage hospitals/employers will not decline as long as you've showed great potential. I worked mostly in critical care and I've seen both ADNs and BSNs in the setting. The BSN is there just in case yo u wanted to get your masters or further your education. You can always get that later (some choose to do it online, i haven't quite accepted how that works, but it's easy i guess is my point...). I do understand, too, that you will have TONS of paying up to do after grad, but know that with your job security and the pay rates we get, you'll get by. Loans are going to be there no matter what, it's like buying a house-- it's an investment. Plus, there are hospitals that can pay back some percentage of your loan-- you just have to keep your eyes open for these opportunities. I suggest looking around now before you graduate so you can have those choices.
    I agree that it might've been cheaper for you to attend a school in Pinas, but I guess if you count how much leg work and effort you'll exert to get your visa and all other tests after-- i think they just cancel each other out. cost vs comfort, i guess...
    PS: though i really wouldn't mind going to school in Pinas-- Life here in the US is very busy and fast paced hehe. I guess given the opportunity to go back and just enjoy life with family and friends while getting inexpensive education, I'd take it
  8. by   nrswnabee
    Quote from IseeU_rn
    Hi nrswnabee! It's nice to see you again I just wanted to let you know that don't worry about opportunities for adn vs bsn. There are tons of open jobs that you can literally decline or choose offers. As long as you pass the NCLEX, jobs will be swarming! You will have the same chances as BSNs do. Because of the shortage hospitals/employers will not decline as long as you've showed great potential. I worked mostly in critical care and I've seen both ADNs and BSNs in the setting. The BSN is there just in case yo u wanted to get your masters or further your education. You can always get that later (some choose to do it online, i haven't quite accepted how that works, but it's easy i guess is my point...). I do understand, too, that you will have TONS of paying up to do after grad, but know that with your job security and the pay rates we get, you'll get by. Loans are going to be there no matter what, it's like buying a house-- it's an investment. Plus, there are hospitals that can pay back some percentage of your loan-- you just have to keep your eyes open for these opportunities. I suggest looking around now before you graduate so you can have those choices.
    I agree that it might've been cheaper for you to attend a school in Pinas, but I guess if you count how much leg work and effort you'll exert to get your visa and all other tests after-- i think they just cancel each other out. cost vs comfort, i guess...
    PS: though i really wouldn't mind going to school in Pinas-- Life here in the US is very busy and fast paced hehe. I guess given the opportunity to go back and just enjoy life with family and friends while getting inexpensive education, I'd take it
    -----
    hey, iseeu_rn, thanks for the encouragement...i'm thrilled to hear from you, too...

    i know what you're saying...i don't intend to go back home to snag a BSN because i'm already here. hehehe, halata na obvious....=) but more than that, the option of studying nursing in the phils. isn't really for me because of some personal reasons. if maybe things aren' t exactly as they are now for me and my family, i could have easily chosen to study in the phils.....sa tutoo, lang....talaga!!!!! it's so freakin' expensive to study here i wanna strangle myself for not listening to my aunt to take nursing as my first degree.

    as to the financial assistance, i wish i can open my eyes wider....i've asked about scholarships in school (i don't have any gpa problems, ahem,...salamat sa elem, hi-school and college schooling foundation sa pilipinas!!!) but i was told i don't qualify yet because of residency, non-citizen, etc. however, i'm keeping my fingers crossed because i could meet the residency requirement by spring...about student loans, i'm scared stiff just thinking about it especially so that i'm not doing any decent-paying job now. (f1 students have limited, limited work opportunities!) all i can afford now is the kind from "non-profit" bodies like....my relatives!!! good thing they are all wonderfully understanding (they are of a rare species nowadays). i only needed to give them my word as my collateral...

    we can argue that ADN and BSN have similar opportunities but why was it called one and the other if they are really just the same? i'm not as young as you are, iseeu_rn, and i know that if i don't get any BSN later, i may get stuck with doing more of the physical work of nursing than maybe administrative or something less strenous...anyhow, i've resolved to take ADN first then worry about BSN later after i've paid off my debts (up to my eyeballs!). it's hard (what's not...in life???) but i'm keeping my focus. when i graduate and pass the nclex, i hope to brush aside all these. look out, world...
  9. by   jenspec
    im a nurse here in michigan.
  10. by   IseeU_rn
    nursewannabe- it's just the amount of years you've taken to finish nursing, that's the only difference. It's just the "karangalan" and added classes of the bachelor status that's different. Nursing-wise they both end up the same = nurses, even the pay is the same. You just have more prospects of advancement when you do the bachelors. I know you know all these, but I just want to reassure you that all is well. At the rate we're going with the shortage, you won't have problems paying them back. Much luck and stay strong
  11. by   nrswnabee
    Quote from IseeU_rn
    nursewannabe- it's just the amount of years you've taken to finish nursing, that's the only difference. It's just the "karangalan" and added classes of the bachelor status that's different. Nursing-wise they both end up the same = nurses, even the pay is the same. You just have more prospects of advancement when you do the bachelors. I know you know all these, but I just want to reassure you that all is well. At the rate we're going with the shortage, you won't have problems paying them back. Much luck and stay strong
    ---you're right. tsaka na yang "dangal"...i feel your love, thanks!
    :icon_hug:
  12. by   nursecpa
    Can anybody please share his/her experience re applying for NY licensure? I'm a new nurse and my next step is to take the NCLEX without going thru CGFNS certification. The NY route is recommended by people here over other states. I'm thinking of Illinois but nothing is final yet. How long has it taken you to have your papers verified by CG and evaluated by NY BON and were there problems along the way?

    Thanks for sharing
  13. by   djv
    Never work there but have being in the Phillippines.

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