RPN/LPN/RNA all the same??? - page 6

I've been looking for information on nursing and the different levels of nursing. I'm getting a little confused. Are RPN/LPN/RNA all the same??? Also, I heard from a friend that Practical Nursing is... Read More

  1. Visit  LPNChris profile page
    1
    LPN's in Canada are not being phased out, it is actually the opposite. The LPN program here in Nova Scotia is now 2 years long and you graduate with a diploma. Hospitals are hiring more and more LPNs because we are able to use more skills now and we are cheaper to hire than the RN's. The gov't here in NS just gave more money to the PN program so they can have more graduates.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  2. Visit  RN_Canada profile page
    1
    "lpns practice autonomously in alberta and are responsible for their practice. they work collaboratively with the health care team and can work independently in many settings. there are some restricted activities that define a level of supervision, otherwise you will not see delegation, supervision, or direction statements anywhere in relation to the lpn scope of practice. i hope this information is helpful."

    this is a direct quote from an email recently received from the college of lpns in alberta.

    i would seem that the scope of practice for lpn's in canada is not consistent in regards to the supervision issue. some provinces requires the lpn to work under supervision or direction and some do not!

    alberta along with ontario seem to have the broadest and most autonomous scope of practice for lpn's but then they also have the longest education period as well.

    i for one would not want this level of responsibility to be assumed by a graduate of a program with one year of education as we have here in bc. perhaps that is why the health professions council kept the supervision requirement when the lpn scope of practice was recently reviewed.

    i just wanted to set the record straight that fiona59 was absolutely correct.

    however, like i said before if canadian nurses are having difficulty with this it must be even more confusing for newcomers!
    Fiona59 likes this.
  3. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    0
    Basically the PN education in Alberta is the old two year diploma RN that was hospital based.

    What has really upset the applecart out here was when Capital Health brought over BScN RNs from the Phillipines, CARNA refused to accept their credentials as the equivalent of the Cdn. BScN and determined their skills and education was the equivalent of the education/training of an AB PN. This was even disproved when these nurses arrived on the hospital floor after attending
    "an introduction to Cdn. nursing" at Norquest. Quite a few had skills that didn't even the level required of a new PN.

    So an experienced LPN in my hospital now grooms a local new grad BScN, LPN and IENs.

    We're tired, we're unhappy and we're still underpaid when you realize how fully our scope of practice is utilized. In active treatment, basically we cannot pierce the blood or travisol bag. An RN does this and then walks away from the LPNs patient. We do all the monitoring and follow up. What's the point. Even though we can insert NGs and understand the rationales, our facility restricts this to an RN skill set.

    Oh and the good news is we will soon be looking after our own PICCs and Central Lines.

    Can somebody tell me what the RNs will be doing when 99% of their job is being performed by the LPN or is this just Alberta Health Services way of saying the RNs are overpaid and plan to be hard on the next set of UNA negotiations.
  4. Visit  charliebrown2 profile page
    1
    Hello gang,
    Just to let you know, I am an RNA in Quebec. Now, the title has been modified to LPN. Also LPNs in Quebec can now start an IV under certain conditions
  5. Visit  msdaisy profile page
    0
    I have been a LPN for many years. I have worked in varous settings from Acute to LTC to Community.
    LPN role in all settings have changed with the times, its sad that some RN's have not changed their attitudes.
    Lpn's are a vital assest to any health care team, and without them the RN's would actually have to do their own work. Most RN's are over paid, lack actual experience, and have the I'm a Rn mentality, its to bad that LPN's still have to prove to them what they know and can do. Its sad that with this nursing shortage that we are facing hiring freezes with Alberta Health while they still build a hospital in southern Calgary. Who is going to work there??? You can bet that the hiring freeze will be lifted for LPN's, because we are just as knowledgeable and CHEAPER and we dont pack that RN attitude. They shouldn't make being a RN so difficult by having to get a degree because we already know just as much or more then they do. Its all just in the experience.
  6. Visit  loriangel14 profile page
    2
    What is also sad is your attitide towards RNs. To imply that RNs are lazy and stupid with bad attitudes says more about you than them. The RNs I work with are generally intelligent hard working nurses and to state that PNs are more skilled or knowledgeable is unfair.
    linzz and Fiona59 like this.
  7. Visit  msdaisy profile page
    0
    If you read what I posted, I said its sad that SOME
    I did not imply all RN's and if you read the above postings you would have read that we were also including charge nurses.
  8. Visit  loriangel14 profile page
    0
    I am sorry to hear your experiences with RNs have been so negative. I have been blessed with wonderful ladies to work along side including our charge who is smart, funny, works like a horse and leads us by shining example.
  9. Visit  charliebrown2 profile page
    0
    Hi in Quebec we are called LPNs now.....when signing our charts ( nuirsing notes) when can sign with the title lpn...ask the oiiaq
  10. Visit  RN_Canada profile page
    0
    They shouldn't make being a RN so difficult by having to get a degree because we already know just as much or more then they do.
    This attitude will get you into a lot of trouble.

    As I have posted many times in this thread the differences in scope of practice between the RN and LPN are not well understood. But there are differences!

    In my experience it is the LPN's who understand this the least. And the people who understand it the best are LPN's who have gone on to obtain their RN degree.
    Its all just in the experience.
    There is also the matter of education. There is absolutely no way that a 1 or two year diploma prepares a nurse to work in the same capacity as a 4 year university degree.

    While experience is important that experience is more valuable when interpreted through the broader knowledge base of a university education.

    We must also remember that there are varying levels of expertise and motivation among all nurses and that includes LPN's and RN's alike. Additionally not all RN's in the system have a university degree. The requirement for a university degree to become a RN is new in many provinces. Quebec may be the last hold out on this.
  11. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    1
    Quote from RN_Canada
    This attitude will get you into a lot of trouble.


    In my experience it is the LPN's who understand this the least. And the people who understand it the best are LPN's who have gone on to obtain their RN degree.

    There is also the matter of education. There is absolutely no way that a 1 or two year diploma prepares a nurse to work in the same capacity as a 4 year university degree.

    While experience is important that experience is more valuable when interpreted through the broader knowledge base of a university education.

    We must also remember that there are varying levels of expertise and motivation among all nurses and that includes LPN's and RN's alike. Additionally not all RN's in the system have a university degree. The requirement for a university degree to become a RN is new in many provinces. Quebec may be the last hold out on this.


    So tell us how you really feel.

    Are you telling me that the two year diploma/hospital trained RNs aren't as "prepared" as a BScN? That ADNs from the US who have moved and are working here aren't as "good" as the Canadian BScN.

    I had thought that the ability to pass the CRNE was the deciding factor on well an RN was prepared to practice.

    I know several LPNs who have become RNs via the diploma (before it was axed) and degree route. Many have not expressed your views. They felt that an unnecessary amount of time was spent writing essays and taking basic Arts courses. Yes, many disease processes were studied in a more indepth process at the RN level BUT and this is a big BUT I've worked with several LPNs who were "the ostomy nurse" or whatever to go to when indepth teaching was required. Because these nurses loved a particular area of care and learned everything they could about it. These LPNs were motivated by their desire to learn and be the best nurse that they could be in that particular area.

    I work with many LPNs who have degrees in fields other than nursing. All can write great essays in their related areas.

    Back in the '70s when the BScN was becoming an option for nursing education, these nurses were meant to be "streamed" towards management level positions. Now what many of see in the degree holding new grads is an attitude that hands on, bedside care is beneath them.
    linzz likes this.
  12. Visit  sunkissed75 profile page
    0
    [quote=loriangel14;2868115]i disagree. the role of the rpn in ontario is growing, with employers using rpns in ever expanding roles. most acute care facilities in my area are very rpn friendly. the trend here is growth not dying. remember this is canada, not the us. things are different up here.


    i agree....i am currently taking the psw program through fanshawe college and we are being told the scope of a psw in the near future is going to entail more of what the rpn's are doing. and the scope of the rpn is going to broaden and cover a lot of what the rn's are doing. the roles in the health care team are definatley changing and growing, but rpn is not being phased out!!! if it is i'm in trouble...i start an rpn program through humber in september!!!!
  13. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    1
    From what PNs educated in AB and Ontario have been able to determine it appears as if the current PN diploma curriculum is very, very close to the old diploma RN programs.
    linzz likes this.


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